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** Fans, Monday. July 4, 1994 No. 34.63! 


U.S. Hopes Its Threat 
Makes Serbs Nervous 

But Geneva Plan’s Phased-In Bite 
Could Undermine Goal of Peace 


By Daniel Williams 

Washing ton Post Servin' ■ 

WASHINGTON — The U-S-backed 
multilateral peace plan for Bosnia to be 
unveiled this weds in Geneva is supposed 
to have a big threat attached. If the Serbian 
insurgents do not go along with the rt»a i. 
then their foes in the Muslim-led govern- 
ment would be exempted from an arms 
embargo and allowed to build up militari- 
ly- 

But it is a threat whose bite is delayed. 
The embargo would be lifted only at the 
end of a series of gradually escalating pun- 
ishments, U.S. officials say. 

_ The phased approach runs numerous 
risks that could undermine the' ultimate 
'» 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

goal of scaring the Serbs, widely viewed as 
the aggressors in the two-year rivD war, 
into settling. 

Will a future threat be taken seriously? 
How certain is the liftin g of the arms 
embargo? 

Britain and France, both among the 
outside powers seeking to impose the deal, 
still oppose ending the ban on grounds 
that such a move would cause the war to 
spread. Russia opposes punishment of the 
Serbs, who are traditional allies of Mos- 
cow. Negotiators still were working on 
diplomatic language to make the threat 
appear viable, in preparation for a foreign 
ministers meeting on Tuesday in Geneva 
that Secretary of State Warren M. Christo- 
pher is scheduled to attend. 

The Clinton administration regards.the 


threat to lift the embargo as a key element 
in getting the Sabs to stop righting. The 
Serbs must be made to fear they would lose 
ground if they do nor settle now, the ad- 
ministration contends. 

It also is critical for the administration 
to seem tough with the Serbs, because 
many in Congress feel that President Bill 
Clinton has done too little to help the 
Muslims. 

On Friday, the administration barely 
fought off a Senate attempt to force the 
United States to lift the arms embargo 
unilaterally and immediately. Hints that a 
threat against the Serbs lacks muscle may 
revive the urge to help the Muslims. Under 
the proposed solution to end the war, the 
Muslims and their Croatian allies would 
receive 51 percent of Bosnia, and the Serbs 
49 percent 

- That means the Serbs would give up a 
substantial chunk of land, as they current- 
ly control more than 70 percent of the- 
territory. 

The presentation of a peace plan by 
Washington and other major powers is 
intended to impress both the Muslims and 
Serbs that this is their last, best hope for 
peace and that neither side can expect to 
gain more territory on the battlefield. 

The effort is a long shot Both sides have 
been stockpiling ammunition, and a cease- 
fire is widely seen as near collapse. The 
Muslims and Croats could reject the peace 
plan, on the expectation that the military 
balance is shifting in their favor. 

If the Serbs are the holdouts, NATO and 

See BOSNIA, Page 6 


Germany Lowers Its Sights 



By Tom Bueride 

International Herald Tribune 

'• BONN — As Germany takes the helm 
of the European Union this week, talk of a 
detemnnedpush toexpandthc bloc’shori- 
zoos and deepen its political integration 
has given way to .more modest ambatkws. 

Bonn is still reeling from the backtab to 
its campaign for Jean-Luc Dehaene for the 
presidency of the Ell's Executive Commis- 
sion, which provoked a British veto and 
aroused widespread fears of German dom- 
ination among its partners. 

“We know we're being closely watched, 
we’re being scrotinized,' r Foreign Minister 
Klaus Kink el told foreign journalists last 
week. Germany's first task will be to try to 
“calm the waters" in EU capitals, he said. 

Moreover, German policymakers ac- 
knowledge that many of their biggest 
goals, such as bringing the countries of 
Eastern Europe into ihe Union and shift- 
ing immigration pressures onto its part- 
ners, will take years to achieve. 

The new realism is a far cry from the 
heady days four months ago, when Germa- 
ny muscled through EU membership trea- 
ties with Austria, Finland, Sweden and 
Norway, while intensive consultations 
with France, which takes oyer the EU 
presidency from Germany in January, 
raised expectations for new momentum. 

"Our presidency will be very down to 
earth," a senior Foreign Ministry official 


said. ‘Don’t promise things you can’t de- 
liver-” 

. . Instead, the main message of the presi- 
dency, which begins in earnest with a 
meeting of .theoommission and the cabinet 
of Chancellor Helmut Kohl here Tuesday, 
wffl be toconfirm the Union as the pillar of 
Germany's foreign policy. 

Mr. Kohl’s repeated professions of loy- 
alty to the Union won a big endorsement 
from votersin the elections for the Europe- 
an Parliament last month, while Mr. Kin- 
kel sought to dispel fears Bonn would 
forsake its partners in a dash for closer ties 
with Eastern Europe. “Germany will not 
pursue a go-it-alone policy ,” he said. 

That is a welcome message in the rest of 
Europe, where the traditional awe 'and sus- 
picion of Germany’s economic might has 
been only enhanced by unification. 

In the short run. Bonn’s EU stewardship 
w31 be determined by whether or not Mr. 
Kohl can repair the damage from the De- 
haene debacle and get his 1 1 fellow leaders 
to agree on a successor to Jacques Delors. 

Mr. Kinkd was to visit Brussels on 
Monday as part of a tour of EU capitals 
aimed at forging a consensus. He men- 
tioned no names in public during visits to ' 
Paris, Rome and London last week, but the 
options are few, European officials say. 
Germany can challenge Prime Minister 
John Major anew by pressing another pro- 
EU Belgian, such as former Prime Minister 

See GERMANS, Page 6 


WORLD CUP tV> GRANDSTAND 


m Hi},. 



\ir-iT,i vn*- Vfnkv I 

Jonas Them struggling past the Saudi midfielder Saeed (hvairan during Sweden’s 3-1 victory in Dallas on Sunday. 


Sweilen 3, Saudla Arabia 1 

Kennel Andersson scored twice 
Sunday and set up another for Martin 
Dahlin as Sweden powered into the 
World Cup quarterfinal for the -first 
time since 1958. 

Germany 3, Belgium 2 

Ruth VOller, the eldest of the elderly, 
scored twice and set up a goal by Jur- 
gen Klinsmann to give the vulnerable 
defending champions at least short- 
term relief. Yet die focal point of the 
match was a penalty not called, when 
Belgium's Josip Weber was tackled 


from behind by Thomas Helmer with 
only the goalkeeper 10 beat. The Sv iss 
referee. Kurt Roethlisberg. waved play 
on as four angry Belgians chased him. 
Spain 3, Swftzertand O 
Spain, behind three tremendous 
saves by goalkeeper Andoni Ztibizar- 
etta. Miguel Nadai's machine-likc con- 
trol over the center of the defense, 
fleet-fool breakaways bv the attackers, 
and a goal early in The match, ad- 
vanced to the quarterfinals. 
Colombian Player Murdered 
Andres Escobar, the Colombian 


player who accidentally scored a goal 
for the United Slates when the ball 
deflected off his leg. was shot to death 
outside a nightclub in Medellin He 
w:., hi: 1 2 times: witnesses said one of 
the gunmen shouted. “Goal! Goal!*” 
each time he fired. 

“My first thought was. better we lose 
the game against Colombia than he 
lose his life," said the U.S. defender 
Thomas Dooley. 

Monday's matches: Netherlands vs. Ireland, <n 
Ofianao, Florida. 1605 GMT. Brazil vs Unrted 
States, in Stanford, California. 1935 GMT. 

World Cup report. Pages 1 6 and 77 


In Iraq, the Opposition Plot Bogs Down 


By Chris Hedges 

New York Times Service 

SALAH AD DIN, Iraq — In a small, 
nondescript house, with armed guards out 
front and the windows bricked shut, the 
men and women who would seize power 
from President Saddam Hussein plot their 
way to Baghdad. 

In cramped, dimly lighted rooms they 
stuff miniature copies of their opposition 
newspaper 'into matchboxes to smuggle 
past Iraqi lines into the capital They re- 
cord blistering attacks against the govern- 


ment to be broadcast on their radio and 
television stations. 

They pound new information into com- 
puters in an effort to flesh out profiles of 
officers who might be willing to stand with 
them against the Iraqi leader. And in a 
camp just outside town, 500 militiamen 
train with former Iraqi officers. 

But three years after the Gulf War. the 
Iraqi National Congress, the umbrella or- 
ganization for Kurdish. Shiite Muslim and 
Sunni Muslim opposition groups, has little 
to show for its efforts. 

Mr. Saddam not only remains in power. 


but with Iraq increasingly in compliance 
with the United Nations cease-fire resolu- 
tion. it seems only a matter of time before 
sanctions are lifted. 

The few coup attempts, only one of 
which, in June 1992. seriously threatened 
the Iraqi leader, were all swiftly crushed. 
Last year, the Clinton administration 
scaled down a covert $40 million program 
run by the Central Intelligence Agency to 
overthrow him. 

Administration officials said much of 
the aid was distributed to groups and offi- 
See IRAQ, Page 6 


For Burmese Dissident, 
Not Even a Hint of Liberty 


By Philip Shenon 

New York Times Service 

kNGOON — Daw Aung San Suu 
the Nobel peace laureate and dissi- 
Ln Burma, is approaching the fifth 
rexsaxy of her house arrest with no 
that her captors in the military intend 
* her, or even talk with her. 



r say they are dismayed that the nnli- 
lovernment is still refusing to open 
ort of dialogue with Daw Aung San 
Cyi despite its suggestion eartier this 
bat it was ready to negotiate, 
trtainly I am disappointed that toe 
iC has not engaged in a dialogue with 
San Suu Kyi,” said the lawmaker, 
tentative BiH Richardson, usmg toe. 
ym for toe State Law and Order 
iration Council, toe formal name of 
a's junta. 

seems that they used my tnp as a 
exercise. I think they’re playing for 

. Richardson, a New Mctco Demi> 
»rho met with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi 


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in February, said in a telephone interview 
from Washington that he planned to re- 
turn to Burma in August and that he stiB 
bdd out “the faint hope” that he might be 
able to convince the junta to open negotia- 
tions with toe dissident. 

He said that he had received no assur- 
ances he would be permitted to meet with 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi although the 
government “hasn’t said no to my request" 
to see her. 

He said he had originally planned to 
return to Burma this month but that the 
government asked him to delay the trip 
untS after July 20, the fifth anniversary of 
Dsw Aung Sun Suu Kyi's house arrest 

In February, Mr. Richardson led a 
group of four Americans who were toe first 
foreign visitors to see Daw Aung San Suu 
Kyi who were not relatives. 

The Oxford-educated daughter of a na- 
tional hero, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi was 
detained in 1989 as pan of a violent crack- 
down on the democracy movement she led. 

Her political party, the National League 
for Democracy, went on to a landslide 
victory in a 1990 election — a victory that 
Burma’s military commanders refused to 
recognize. 

Diplomats here said in recent interviews 
that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, 49, was in 
gpod health as she remained confined to a 
lakeside compound here that had belonged 
to her laic mother. Her husband, an Ox- 
ford University scholar, and their two sons 
are allowed to visit her. 

Daw Arag San Sun Kyi has refused to 
accept assistance from the government and 

See BURMA, Page 6 



Kiosk 


French Forces 
Trade Fire With 
Rwanda Rebels 

GIKONGORO, Rwanda (Com- 
bined Dispatches) — French troops 
were attacked by Rwandan rebels 
Sunday in the first such clash since 
Paris sent an intervention force Into 
the country 10 days ago. a French 
military official said. 

Guerrillas of toe Tuts -dominated 
Rwandan Patriotic Front fired on 
French forces evacuating civilians 
from toe southern town of Butare. 
said Colonel Didier Thibaut. The 
Bench fired back, be said. There were 
no casualties on toe French side, but 
toe rebels may have suffered losses. 

“We passed a RPF checkpoint, and 
soon after we passed we were shot 
upon,” Colonel Thibaut said. “We 
opened up with everything we had.” 
including heavy machine guns, he 
said. The exchange of fire lasted 30 
seconds, he said, adding that the con- 
voy had continued to Gikongoro 
where the French have set up a base. 

In a further indication of mounting 
tensions between toe two sides, an 
official of the Rwandan Patriotic 
Front in Brussels denounced France's 
plan to set up a security zone in south- 
west Rwanda for civilians fleeing re- 
bel advances. (AFP. AP) 


Books 

Bridge 


Page 7. 
Page 7. 


Pj>,- 1 \r>«ii)inl Picv- 

WINNING WAYS — Pete Sampras on his way to a straight-set victory 
Sunday over Goran Ivanisevic, his second Wimbledon ride in a row. Page 15. 


Rabin Assails 
Rightists for 
Endangering 
Peace Plans 

Jerusalem Protesters 
Anger Cabinet Ministers 
As Arafat Tours Gaza 

By Joel Greenberg 

Sew York Tima Serine 

JERUSALEM — Slung by a barrage of 
ami-government protests set off by Yasser 
Arafat’s visit to Gaza. Prime Minister 
Yi tzhak Rabin lashed out Sunday at his 
rightist opponents, accusing them of lying 
and of exploiting victims of Muslim terror- 
ist attacks in a campaign to undermine 
Israel’s accord with the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization. 

“The extreme right in Israel celebrates 
the blood shed by the terrorist murderers 
of extremist Islam, trying to use the Israeli 
victims as a lever against the agreement,” 
Mr. Rabin told a Labor Party gathering. 
“The extremist murderers of Islamic Holy 
War and Hamas are the tool of toe extreme 
right in Israel." 

Days of opposition protests and Mr. 
Rabin's blistering counterattack raised 
questions about where toe boundaries of 
dissent and of government power ought to 
be set in Israel. 

Cabinet ministers accused the opposi- 
tion of abusing democratic freedoms and 
of inciting Israelis to rebellion, while oppo- 
sition leaders charged that Mr. Rabin was 
panicking in toe face of legitimate protest 
and trying to gag his critics. 

The debate flared as the cabinet held its 
weekly meeting behind a tight security 
cordon of hundreds of policemen who 
blockaded roads leading to Mr. Rabin’s 
office to keep out rightist demonstrators. 

Outside toe barriers, a few hundred pro- 
testers blew whistles and banged on pots 
and metal signs with the aim of disrupting 
toe cabinet session. Scuffles broke out 
when toe police pushed toe demonstrators 
back, and at least 65 were arrested. 

After toe cabinet meeting, ministers ac- 
companied by bodyguards were driven out 
of the office compound through a tide 
gate. Mr. Rabin had warned last week that 
the protesters might try to take over gov- 
ernment offices. 

Ministers were clearly angered by a 
large anti-government rally on Saturday 
night, in which Mr. Rabin and his cabinet 
were denounced as traitors who had made 
a criminal alliance with Mr. ArafaL Ac- 
cording to Israeli news reports, some min- 
isters criticized local television coverage of 
toe rally as being overly sympathetic to the 
protesters. 

Police Minister Moshe Shahai accused 
See ARAFAT, Page 6 


It’s Wait and See 
For the Dollar 
Before G- 7 Talks 

By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Amid a raging debate about 
whether they should or shouldn't and 
whether they will or won’t before toe week- 
end, the leading central banks appear to 
have the foreign exchange market exactly 
where they like it — hopping uncertainly 
from one fool to the other. 

“We’re beaded for a speculative lull un- 
til after the Group of Seven summit next 
weekend,” said Paul Chertkow, London- 
based analyst at Union Bank of Switzer- 
land. 

The week's calendar provides the central 
banks with perfect cover for a respite. The 
New York market is dosed Monday for 
the Independence Day holiday, so trading 
elsewhere probably will be subdued. 

Trading on Tuesday and Wednesday 
probably will be cautious, as the market 
awaits a signal from the. Federal Reserve 
Board’s policy-making Open Market 
Committee meetings. But even no an- 
nouncement of a policy change is unlikely 
to be convincing because toe Fed might 
wait for the June unemployment report 
Friday or for joint action following the 
s ummi t meeting before announcing a new 
increase in short-term interest rates. 

The Bundesbank council meeting on 
Thursday and the possibility of a German 
interest rale cut will give currency traders 
another reason to pause. 

Most analysis said that no action on 
adjusting interest rates to make the dollar 
more appealing would lead to further 
downward pressure. 

"The technical outlook for toe dollar 
remains bearish,” Mr. Chertkow said. 
“The breach of technical support for toe 
dollar against the yen — Iasi at the psycho- 
logically important 100 level — signaled a 
move to 95. The breach of technical sup- 
port for toe dollar against the Deutsche 
mark at 1.6250 signaled a mow? to 1 J700." 

The dollar ended last week at 98.65 yen 
and 1.5966 DM. 

Meanwhile, there is a considerable dif- 
ference Of views on whether interest rate 
actions will suffice to calm toe currency 
market and whether a U.S. rate increase is 
justified. 

The key to whether toe dollar stabilizes 
depends on stabilizing (he U.S. bond mar- 
ket and attracting portfolio flows back into 
U.S. assets, said Gerard Lyons. London- 
based analyst for Dai-Ichi'Kangyo Bank 

See DOLLAR, Page 6 







w 

i 

r 


Page 2 


**. 



i 


Q&A: Bold Steps by G-7? Not Likely, a Veteran Says 


The annual economic summit meet- 
ing of the Group of Seven industrial- 
ized nations starts on Friday in Na- 
ples. Robert D. Hormats, vice 
chairman of Goldman Sachs Interna- 
tional in New York, helped prepare 
eight of these summit meetings as an 
adviser to Presidents Gerald Ford, 
Jimmy Carter, and Ranald Reagan. 
He spoke with Alan Friedman of the 
International Herald Tribune. 


Q. With most of the leaders at this 
year’s G-7 meeting distracted by do- 
mestic problems, and the dollar slip- 
ping steadily against the Japanese 


yen, expectations are low this year. 
Wbat do you 


> you expect to emerge from 

Naples? 

A. I think President Bill Clinton 


nut is thaf most of the leaders are 
preoccupied by domestic economic 
and political problems and many of 
them are giving to find it hard to take 
any bold .or major initiatives at Na- 
ples. 

Q. What then is the best that Mr. 
Clinton ca& hope for? 

A. The *best is that the summit 
reaffirms cooperation on currency 
matters, commits G-7 members to 
ratifying the results of the Uruguay 
Round of the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade by the end of this 
year, provides continuing support for 
President .Boris Yeltsin’s economic 
reforms in Russia, and maybe im- 
proves the summit as an institution. 


will probably go in as the strongest of 
the leaders then 


there, in large measure 
because the American economy is 
doing well in terms of growth perfor- 
mance, low inflation and job cre- 
ation, as well as success in reducing 
the deficit. The difficulty at this sum- 


Q. How- could you improve the 
summit’s workings? 

A. By allowing a larger portion of 
time to be spent by leaders alone 
rather than with their ministers, and 
by creating the concept, over time, of 
associate membership so as to better 
integrate Russia, China, India, and a 
! group of other countries. Also, 


in a world economy whoa we are 
worried about regionalism and frag- 
mentation, it would be good for the 
heads of the International Monetary 
Fund, World Bank, and the new 
World Trade Organization to be pre- 
sent 

Q. Aside from the expected big- 
ticket issues of job creation, Russia, 
macroeconomic policy and trade, the 
dollar crisis has been effectively 
forced onto the' agenda at Naples. 
What can G-7 leaders do about the ■ 
dollar, and what needs to be done? 

A. There is little that can be done 
of a dramatic nature at Naples. They 
can reinforce their desire tor cooper- 
ating to stabilize currencies and un- 
derscore their commitment to stable, 
n nninfiati onary growth. But the risk 
is that if they get into a fight about 
interest rates or trade, that could 
have a negative effect on the markets. 

Q. Do you favor a rise in U.S. 
interest rates by the Federal Reserve 
and a further lowering of European 
and Japanese rates as a partial step 
dollar? 


A. 1 don’t favor a U.S. rale increase 
because t think the Fed has it just 
about right. But I do think that over 
time there is room for modest rate 
reductions in Europe and Japan, not 
so much to stabilize the currency 
markets but because their domestic 
circumstances would benefit and 
that in turn would ixnprove the trade, 
balance with the United States and.; 
strengthen the dollar. 


the 


Q. Until recently there were ] 
of announcing progress on U.S.-Jap- 
anese trade talks at the G-7 meeting. 
With the governments in Japan jkjw 
changing as fast as Italy’s used to, 
what can we expect from Japan ax 
this summit? 

A. There will be considerable focus 
on what the new Japanese govern- 
ment has to say about stimulating its 
economy. But Z don’t think we 
should be expecting much sincethe- 
govemment has only been in office- a 
few days. There may, however, be 
some hints. 


Q. Mr. Yeltsin wiB be in Naples, 
and for the first time Russia will sign 
a joint communique after a day Of 
political talks .’.with G-7- leaders. 
Should Russia be made a full mem- . 
bar of the 07? 

A. The G-7 countries are those 
with long-standing democracies, 
market economics and which for 30 
■years have worked together to shape 
the global trade and financial system. 
And they have the world’s key cur-, 
rendes. In light of that the Russian 
desire to join' as a full member 
premature. • 

Q. How much erf the G-7 summit is 
genuinely- spontaneous, and how 
much is scripted by government shor- 
pas? 

A. Normally, very little is sponta- 
neous. About 95 percent of the com- ■ 
munkju6 is written ahead . of time. 
But on occasion the leaders come np 
with ah idea they want to pursue, and 
1 think that increases the argument 
for more private time among the 


WORLD BRIEFS 


r 

/ 

ti 


it 


with the help of 

the successor to the East German Communist Party. 

A 2d U.S.-Based Saadi Envoy Defects 


.» _ 


LONDON (WF) — A former vice consul at the Saudi conflate 
in Houston has left) 


Kurds Stage Attacks 
On German Police 


Hauers 


HAMBURG — Militant 
Kurds attacked police stations 
across Germany in apparent re- 
taliation for the ldlling of a 16* 
y ear-old Turkish Kura by a po- 
liceman last week, the 
authorities said Sunday. 


'lions in at least seven cities, 
including Hamburg, Hannover, 
rbrficken; 


burg, Han 
Saarbrficken and ftjbinz. About 
a dozen police cars were dam- 


Separately, unknown at- 
tackers threw firebombs at a 
Turkish cultural center in Ham- 
burg on Sunday morning, 
wounding four people, the po- 
lice said. 


They said that incident, to- 
gether with the smashing of a 
Turkish mosque’s windows in 
Hannover on Sunday, appeared 
to be connected to feuding be- 
tween Turks and ethnic Kurds. 


At least seven Turkish citi- 
zens, many of them ethnic 
Kurds, were arrested on Satur- 
day after attacks with fire- 
bombs and stones on police sta- 


The police in Hamburg said 
they believed the “Attacks were 
in retaliation for the death last 
Thursday of Ayfaan Eser, who 
was shot by a policeman as he 
struggled to rcszs? being ques- 
tioned. Most attacks took place 
at roughly the same time on 
Saturday aftemoqp- 

MiUtant Kurds in Germany 
have several times launched at- 
tacks against Turkish property 
to press their clafin for an end 
to H uman rights abuses and for 
independence for their home- 
land in southeaster^ Turkey. 

On Saturday .about 500 
Kurds in Hannover and 200 in 
Hamburg held largely peaceful 
marches to p rotes* ‘the killing. 



U.S. Is Said 
to 


m Houston nas uat his post and applied for political asjdum nr 
Britain, the second of two Saudi diplomats fonneriy based in the 
United States to have defected and claimed 
The latest to Sanch rulecame from Ahme a Za nrani, 

34, saying he was subjected to '“political pressure antf threats by 
the Riyadh government bccause.be wrote a book, about Saudi 
poetics, Mr. ZahranT s defection follows that of Mohammed 
Abdullah Khflewi, a first secretary m the Saudi mission to the 
United Nations.. He left his post and sought asylum m the United 
States t gct month after saying he had “positive -proof -of severe 
violations of h uman in Saudi Arabia.’’ 

>n.. i -- l.u>'Kmi mei ii rwl hclhe fTrtwinnttnw. 



JaU 111 JflUUl ruCU/JAt 

The defections appear to have been inspired by the Committee. 

/Legitimate Rights, a group of anti -government ’ 

■ - . i w tVai nnor. 


More Limits 
On Missiles 


H often SpKM/Tbe Awdwil Pro* 

A member of the Turkish cultural center in Hamburg checking the damage on Sunday. 


DUTY FREE ADVISORY 


Iran Frees German Engineer 
Condemned as an Iraqi Spy 


US$1 3.000,000 



The Associated Prea 

BONN — Helmut Srimkus, a 
German engineer who had been 
sentenced to death in Iran as as 
Iraqi spy, has been released af- 
ter months of negotiation and is 
back in Germany in good 
health. 

Mr. Sri min is was condemned 
by an Iranian court after having 
been convicted of spying for 


Iraq during the 1980-88 war. 
The dep 


deputy government 
spokesman, Norbert Schaefer, 
said Mr. Szimkus flew to 
Frankfurt on Friday and was in 
“relatively good health." He 
said Mr. Srimims had not com- 


plained about bis treatment 
during the five years he spent in 
the Iranian, prison system. 

- Mr. Sch^efeFs statement did 
not refer to the spyii^cmvic- 
tion against Mr. Srimkus. .It 
said his pardon and release re- 
sulted from talks with senior 
officials during the. visit to Ger- 
many in mid-June by Foreign 
Minister AH Akbar VdayatL 
German news organizations 
have speculated that Iran hopes 
toinfluencethe trial in Beriin of 
an Iranian and four pro-Iranian 
Lebanese Shiite Muslins ac- 
cused of killin g a Kurdish lead- 
er in 1992. 


■ 

USS1 38.000 oaid out at each 
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drav/. USS 13 Miiiion won so 

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far. In the world-famous Abu 

mail. Money paid in cash, by 

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ticket priced at USS 133. Just 

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1.200 tickets entered in each 

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The way the 

world's going 



Thomas W. Lip pmati - 

W mhJ n gt m Post Service 

WASHINGTON v- The 
Clinton administration has 
agreed to a Russian demand f or 
additional limits aq the speed 
and range of a new generation 
of defensive missiles being de- 
veloped by the Defense Depart- 
ment, according to a senior ad- 
ministration official and other 
sources. 

While agreeing, to limits in 
principle, however, tbe admin- 
istration has not accepted the 
specific ones proposed by Rus- 
sia, which would effectively 
veto the development of air- 
anti sea-based defensive mis- 
siles in the Pentagon pipeline, 
officials said. 

The negotiations hold im- 
mense implications for U.S. de- 
fensive strategy in the post- 
Cold War era. 

-In addition, the negotiations 
are being held at a time when 
Russia is taking a hard line in 
parallel talks on several nuclear 
and nonproliferation issues, ad- 
ministration officials said. Qm- 

gressional conservatives and 
even some administration, offi- 
cials fadieve Washington is^po- 
ceding too much in these taifcC 

For decades the principal 
military threat to U.S. security 
was posed fay intercontmental 
“strategic” missiles in the Sovi- 
et arsenal. But now die Penta- 
gon wants to devdop mobile 
missiles that would intercept 
shorter-range “theater” missiles 
deployed overseas fay countries 
such as Iraq and North Korea. 

In the 1972 Anti-Ballistic 
Missile Treaty, the United 
- States and die Soviet Union 
agreed not to develop mobile 
systems to shoot down each 
other’s strategic missiles. The 
aim was to halt dm cycle of 
escalation in which each side 
kept trying to develop new ways 
to trump the other’s defenses. 

But the treaty did not define 
the line between “strategic’’ 
missile defenses, which are pro- 
hibited, and “theater” defenses, 
such as the Patriots used m the 
Gulf War; which are permitted. 

To develop missile 
tors more advanced than 
Patriots, including the Theater 
High Altitude Area Defense 
Program, or THAAD, mid 
longer-range airborne and sea- 
based systems, the administra- 
tion needs the consent of Russia 
and of Congress. 


far the. Defense of leg mgw w - o--— — , 

Islamic activists and human-rights campaigners that oper-, 
atos from London: 1 

Nerve Gas Deaths Baffle Japanese 

TOKYO (AP) —Fames that kilkd seven people maresddential; 
area last week contained a- substance believed used in chemical , 
weapons, but the police have no dues to why the nerve gas wasj|- 
there, an official said Sunday. , ' . T 

Another 204 people were severely sickened by fumes that, 
spread thrrwgh a neighborhood as many of the vicrims . slept lasv 
Tuesday in Matsmnoto, 200 kilometers northwest of Toltyo. ■ 
The police found tl^ substance, beftoyed to be the horve gas ; 
Sarin, in two! braids and a bucket s! die home of Yoshiyiiki Kono ) 
»n n in water m the bathroom of a neighboring apartment where a > 
45-year-old man died, said a poticespokesman. Later, the police 1 
sei zed more Him 20 dtoocals at Mr. Kono’s home, and officials . 
«taiH investigators were trying todetermine whether Sarin could be 1 
prodheedfromthose c he mi cal s. • 


0 

& 


2,090 Rebels Slain in ’94, Turks Say 


ANKARA (AFP) — Government forces killed 2,090 rebels . 
from the separatist Kurdish Workers Party in the first half of ; 
1994, the Anatolian News Agency reported Sunday, quoting an . 
Interira Ministry reportc- ... • ; 

The rebels were, killed in mainly Kurdish areas in eastern and , 
southeastern Turkey. The report said 7,195 rebels had been > 
arrested and 226 aunenderedin the same period. 

The Turkish Army has been carrying out extensive operations - 
since the spring, aiming to eradicate the separatist group by the ; 
end of the year. More than 12,000 people have been killed in the ! 
Kurdish itibdliiOQ since 1984. . 


ought to divide nr two again because thehfestyles of tbe East and 3 
West were hHxmiptttibie:^' ;_/ - J 

Mri^Mmwvdtyariwed in Yieteda^as’S menfixrdf-aiiRusaan • 
ddjqgati<m to a meeting of European legislators from the 53 j 
nations of titeGonferedoe fra Security and Cooperation in Europe . 
that js to open Tuesday. 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


In France, ixt w ^ 

VALENCE, France (AFP) — The French police have set up at 
computerized caO-in system that works in English, German, ‘ 
Spanish and Italian for motorists seeking hdp along a stretch of! 
the A7 highway in southeastern France. ... 

*Tt vtiH save us a lot of time,*’ said Bernard Wespiesra, a police! 
officer in Valence “We will no longer have to speak 'gibberish, to 
no end without really undemanding what the foreigners are' 
teDing us.” 

Thc systcm has been in service far .a week, and highway 
, authorities said it had reduced their response tune. During the! 
summer vacation period, up to 40 percent of the motorists in the 
region are foreigners. - j 

Arson Is suspected in a fire that destroyed nearly 20 buildings of' 
an outdoor museum in. the town of Sanak, m sooth western! 
Poland,. Radio Zet said Sunday. The fire, which broke out Satur- 
day, destroyed parts of the 120-buflding rural architectural exhibi- 
tion, the radio said. (Reuters)'. 

The Temple Mood in Jerantm wiE ' be closed to visitors! 
through Mobdayas a preventive measure during Yasser Arafefs. 
visit to the autonomous Palestinian tmitorira. Bnt Muslim wor- 1 
rinpers will be allowed to go to A1 Aqsa Mosque ou the Temple! 
Mount, the police said. • . (AJP^ 


In two rounds n^otiatiom 
in the Washingtem-Moscow 

“standing consultative commit- 
tee,” the U.S. side has proposed 
that interceptors be allowed to 
knock out incoming missiles 
with ranges m> to about 3,500 
kilometers (2^00 inSes). 

Officials partly confirmed 
and partly denied a stray in 
Friday’s Washington Tunes 
saying that UJ5. negotiators 
have also agreed to accept lim- 
its on the “flyout spced” of the 
defensive systems that would 
permit the development of' 
THAAD but not the air force 
and navy systems. 


A cholera alert was issued in HongKong after health inspectors! 
found traces of .the bacteria in a restaurant’s fish tanks, newd| 
reports in the colony said Sunday. Officials then destroyed fist? 
stocks in that restaurant and four others whose tanks had been fed 1 
by the same water supplier. The water had been taken from a! 
local, heaviy pofiuted typhoon shelter, the reports said. Five 
people nave been contracted cholera so far. (AFP/ 



and religious holidays: 

'MONDAY: Boama-Hozcgovnia, Colombia, Grama. Latuhe,' Macedonia, 
Peru, Puerto Rioo; Slovakia, United Slates, Serbia. 

TUES DAY: Algeria, Cadi RepobSc, Rwanda, Vcnecoda, * 

WEDNESDAY: Gaedi Republic, Litimama, MalawL 
mUBSDAYr TanMn&i, Serbia. | 

SATURDAY : Ar p«iitiiY« • . 

Sources.- F.P. Morgan, Reuters. • 


To call from country to country, or back to the U.S., dial the WorldPhone number of the country you're calling from. 


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(Available Cram public taidphone?' only.' 


*2 


Encourage 
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(Outside of Managua, dial 02 fim.) ' 166' 
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Panama ... . ^08 

Milttuytaear 28HW08 

p ^BWTh ; .IJ08-.U-800, 

PeruCOmsldc of Lima, dud 190 6rsi ) 001-190 

Poland! CQ _ Ov-0 1-04-800-222 

PwregalCCa ' 05-017-1234 

PHawWeolCO 1 -800-888-8000 

San MxrmoiCOt ■ J 72-1022 

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South AfrkatCO ^ 0800-99-0011 


900-99-0014. 
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(SPEOAC. PHONES ONLY) 

Urlted JBngdoiafCa - : i _ t , .. 

locaO the U-S. asms 8T ■ 0800-8M222- 

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1b can anywhes other ihandm USO500^0(M00t 
^ ra 8 Q *y - 000-412 . 

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L'se your MO CanL* bad iclcphonc card or call collca^aD st the Kara k»w rates. 

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.Let It Take You Around the World, 

From MCI . - 




Imprimi par Offprint. 73 rue de r&xmgik, 7S0I8 Paris. 


lj* {JlSJo 


R 

i. 

r- 






Zhirmovskj Predicts Divided Europe > 

VIENNA (A?) —The Russian nationalist Vladimir V. Zhirin- ; 
ovsky predicted Sunday that Europe woedd again split Into two ! 
halves. East and West, because Easterners felt let down by* 
Western promises and lack of action. 

In an mtemtwwito the Austria Press Agency. Mr. Zhirinovsky . 
also reiterated his belief that Russia’s, future is best guaranteed by ! 


It— *7- 


tbe re-creation of the Soviet union. Me also said that Europe^ 

last and* 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE., MONDAY, JULY 4, 1994 

DEADLINE AT STA 


Page 3 


*pher 9 a 6- Month 2d Chance 








ByAnnDevroy ening his perfdnnance and improving his been only margmaffy effective in formulat- 

w Wa *^S aw ^«*rite . -team, l.' .. ing foreign poOcy and has been ineffective 

WASHINGTON — President BUI Clin- Changesm die second level of officials in defending, explaining and promoting iL 

tonwiB wait until the end of the year to at the State Department have been enfold- The role of policy promoter is more 
tew whether his admimstrationViRuch- ’ mg over sawral weeks as the secretary, critical in this than in many previous ad- 
entiazed performance in international af- - accordn^ to an advocate, wcnt through a ministrations 'because the president rardy 
f^n^tsihereplaceznentof Secreurvof “painfal process*' of reassembling a team performs the rote — and then primarily in 
State Warren M. Christopher or other to-Mp hsm-scorc some points” for the times of crisis or when on a trip abroad, 
members, of his foreign policy team, a& president and for himsdf. ‘ Mr. Cfimon has said the main problem 


been only marginally effective in formulat- 
ing foreign poBcy and has been ineffective 


in defending, explaining and promoting iL 
The role of policy promoter is more 
critical in this than in many previous ad- 


'• • *'**+&, *(-.£• ‘ 


mMwjers. of las foreign policy team, a c* 
c«wng.to rcrnor officials and outsiders 
who have talked to the president. 

. ' 1 > c sources describe Mr. dmton as 
Jjavmgh^lobbied heavily on twoironts 
by Democrats outside the administration 
*? d some officials within h. Theywam 
him to reorganize his White House team 
to strengthen his foreign policy team, 

ET^cES^^*"^ 

JjJSf IwSfr (Mack) Mcliny, 

™**8finieu.t and Bui 
get director, Leon E. Parana. 

M Mr. Christopher, sources said, has had 
a couple conversations over several 
months with Mr. Cfintonabout strength- 


times of crisis or when on a trip abroad. 
Mr. Clision has mid the main problem 


- The cffect of Mr. CXnxon's decision to Hes in the communication of his foreign 
rnt off the jtersqamel issue is to put Mr.' policy. He has told the Los Angeles Times 
Hhristophtt — and to a kbser degree the that he did a "better job of c omm un ic a t - 


national security adviser^ W. Anthony 
Lake — into a limbo of sorts, on probation 
until the president decides if he wants 


“I think the president has deliberately Robert Strauss, laid out Mr. Christopher’ 
decided to hold this all in abeyance,” said drawbacks to Mr. Clinton in conversation 
an adhrinisttation aide who discussed it .about the time of the funeral of forme 
with Mr. Qiatoa. . ... President Richard Nixon in April 

Another aide; a backer of Mr. Christo- Mr. Stracss is said to have told th< 


destined tobeout the door within weeks.” 
“Buthedoes have something to prove 
now,** the aide added. “He has to prove 
that this job belongs to him and he is a net 
plus for the president” 

Critics of Mr. Christopher say he has 


policy. He has told the Los Angeles Times 
that if he did a “better job of rommunic a t- 
ing” foreign, policy, the public would be 
“much more understanding of wbai Fm 
trying to do.” ' 

- One Democratic adviser to presidents, 
Robert Strauss, laid out Mr. Christopher's 
drawbacks to Mr. Clinton in conversations 
about the time of the funeral of former 
President Richard Nixon in April 
Mr. Strauss is said to have told the 
president that the Democratic establish- 
ment and the public at large were losing 
faith in Mr. Christoper, and thus Mr. Clin- 
ton. He said that foreign policy appeared 
to be ad hoc and that Mr. Christopher 
seemed disengaged from significant geo- 
political issues except the Middle East 


* POLITICAL VOTES * 


Congr— » Cant Shalt* Bad Public Image 

, WASHINGTON — Four months before its members face 
the voters, the 103d Congress is seen as a do-nothing assem- 
blage of quarrelsome partisans more attuned to the special, 
interests than to its constituents, according toa Washington 
Post-ABC News poll. ! 

Six out of 10 of those polled disannrave of the wav 


U.S. Speeds Search 

JL- ‘ 

For Haiti Peace Force 


interests than to its constituents, according toa Washington 
Post-ABC News poll. ! 

Si * ou t of IQ of those polled disapprove of the way 
Congress is doing itsjob, but an equal proportion approve the 
work of their own representatives. Any comfort incumbents 
may draw from. that has to be balanced by the fact t ha t only 
35 percent say they are inclined to re-elect their representa- 
tive, while 54 percent want to look for someone rise. Those 
figures are nearly identical to the 1992 numbers that presaged 
the i biggest turnover in the makeup of the House of Represen- 
tatives in almost five decades. . ", 

In 19 surveys .over the last , five years, spanning three 
Congresses, and two presidents, the average scores for Con- 
gress have been 33 percent approval and 62 percent disap- 
proval The latest poll —34 percent approval and 61 percent 
disapproval — - is m fine with that. 

The disapproval number is down S percentage points from 
the level when the 103d Congress began in January 1993, but 
it is 26 points higher than it was 20 years ago, when Congress 
was confronting President Richard M. Nixon in the impeach- 
ment proceedings that led to his resignation. The numbers do 
not split on partisan lines. SSx oarof 10 Democrats and an 
equal percentage of Republicans say they disapprove of the 
job Congress is doing. - 

Overwhelming majorities say they think that members of 
Congress care more about special interests than about “peo- 
ple luce you” and care more about keeping power than, about 
the best interests of the nation. Few think most members have 
a high personal moral code. Large numbers say most candi- 
dates for Congress make campaign promises they have no 
intention of fulfilling and quickly lose touch with the people 
after arriving in Washington. 

Not swpnsmgly, thepublic favors term limits for members 
of Congress by 3 to 1. - . J (WP) 

Congr— » U .WWp^tN CtiwploB^ 

WASHINGTON —Eager to trim spending and shocked 
by the case of Aldrich Kazan Ames, the CIA employee who 


By Daniel Williams 

- W taUagim Pan Sorter. . 

WASHINGTON — As inva- 
sion moves dose to die fore- 
front of options for forcing Hai- 
ti’s zmfitaiy rulers from office, 
the : United States hay acceler- 
ated its search for a peacekeep- 
ing force to take ova* in the 


“save the institutions you repre- 
sent, the military, because . . . 
we are not going to allow a 
group of thugs to take over a 
country.” 

The increased urgency in re- 
cruiting peacekeepers high- 
lights the way in which the in- 
tensified exit of refugees is 


country once any militar y ao- shaking up Mr. Clinton’s Hai- 
tian is over, UJS. officials say. tian policy, although the ad- 
Th«» p q^apin wants to Imo w ministration is still counting on 
m advancejnst who win take eooaosmc sanctions to drive 



over should U,S. troops invade General C6dras and others into 
the country. Without firm com- exile, 
mitments, it resists sending Mr. Clinton wants to avoid a 

troops ashore, officials said. sudden influx of Haitian refu- „ . , , . „ , . „ , , . , 

Daring ihar meat visits to bw into Florid*, which would Investigators at the crash ate Sunday in Charlotte, tea than half a mile from the runway. 
Washington. President Carlos ukdy create a voter backlash 
SaMMenem of Argentina nationally much as occurred 
promised troops and President when tens of thousands of Cu- 
id£^F?5cf Chile pledged bans took off for Honda to- 
poitce trainers for a peacekeep- ward the cad of Jimmy Carter's 
mg mission. Canada has also presidency, 
pledged to provide up to 1,500 A steady exodus has raised 


Sltit He<K i The Vm'jWI Pkw 


peacekeepers. At least 5,000 fears that a refugee camp just 
and perhaps thousands more opened at the U.S. naval base at 
will be needed to pacif y Haiti in Guantanamo Bay on the east- 
case of the removal of Lieuten- era end of Cuba, and one soon 
ant General Raoul C6dras and to open on the Turks and Cat- 
other military leaders. cos islands will quickly be over- 

President Bill Clinton's spe- whelmed. For now, riven the 
rial envoy to Haiti, WHfiarn H. domestic pressures cm Mr. Oin- 
Gray 3d, traveled to the island tan,only the return of the exiled 
of Barbados on Sunday toque- president, the Reverend Jean- 
iy leaders from the Caribbean Bertrand Aristide, would give 
Community nations about pos- die .moral cover to return 
srbfe contnhntions aa well as to Haitians, and end the refu- 

ebdt thof ^mhourii^Hai- geecrisis. r- 

tian refugees tledng the island. To buy time, Mr. Gray will 
a scmOT crf&aal said. arit Caribbean leaders to pn> 

Appcarjngon CBS television vhie space for refugees, rimsttrf 
carrier Sunday, Mr. Gray said atom are fleeing Haiti in boats, 
that tbe “United States is not On Sunday, he used the phrase 
con templating an uxanmeat in- “safe haven” to describe what is 
vflgion nf Hmti." - needed, ‘suggesting a holding 

He began, however, to lay the area from ^ch tfew would be 

groundwork for invasion at - 
some paint, by drawing on a hons there change 
tune-tested excuse: to safe- Recent: talk, of invasion is, 
guard American lives. “The spark ing congressional debate, 


P| wt peril Aim thraiRandB more 

will be needed to pacif y Haiti in 
case of the removal or lieuten- 
ant General Raoul C6dras and 
other military leaders. 

President Bill Clinton's spe- 
cial envoy to Haiti, WiQiamlL 
Gray 3d, traveled to the island 
of Barbados on Sunday to que- 
ry leaden from the Caribbean 
Community nations about pos- 
sible contnbutians m w^ as to 
elidt thof help in housing T^i- 


tian refugees tledng the island, 
* senior official said. 


increadnriy aggressive assault on the Central Intel li g en ce 
Agency's Budget and tra dition a l in d e p e n dence. 

Key ccmgrrasioiial committees afrrady have dashed hun- 
dreds of .millions of dollars from intelligence programs, some 
of which have been applied to the CLvs $3 taflion portion of 
the overall $28 biffion intelligence community budget. . 

Over the objections of the director of central -mtelllMoc^ 
R. James Woqlscy, and the White House, the Senate Select 


Committee aii Intelligence is pushing legislation to set by law 
the respcmabiUties between the agency and FBI for counter- 
intelligence operations abroad. . 

In the latest sign of increased congresskmal involvement in . 
the agency’s affairs, three senators offered a bill to set' up a 
to study the poat-Cold War needs ror 
the entire intelligence community and make recommenda- 
tions by the end of 1996 on a structure to cany them out 
The c ongres s! rm *1 HA campaig n enmes just as the FBI and 
Pentagon are rtibbting at the agency's arras of responsibility, 
eyeing its budget and trying to discredit it by leakin g embar- 
rassing tales of past CIA foul-ups, according to current and 
former agency officials. s- 

“There is a perception that the agency is m a tveakened 
position with no strong protector xn the White House,” 
Robert M. Gates, a former CIA director, said. . 

“Bureaucratic turf wars are one of the enduring features of 
Washington," a former top CIA offic ia l - said. “Tne FBI and 
the Defense Department are out to score points and gain turf 
af the CIA’s expense. : . 

“But what’s new and surprising,” he added, ts the number 
of present and former employees willing to say what a bunch 
of mans there are out there running the place." - . - (WP) 

Quofe/Unqiwt* ’ 

Thomas F. (Mack) McLarty, President BiD CKriton’s boy- 
hood friend from Arkansas who was replaced last wedc as 

White House chief of staff : “When you see a documented of 

John F. Kennedy or whatever and you-see the Oval Office, 
and you’re at home at 10 o’clock at night watching something 
like that, you say, ‘Gosh, I was just there three hours ago in 
that same spot.’ ” (Reuters) 


Away From Politics 


• The anti-leukemia drug dadriblne appears 
to halt the advancement of the chronic, pro- 
gressive form of multiple sclerosis, a form for 
which there is currently no treatment, re- 
searchers at the Scripps Research Institute in 
San Diego reported in The Lancet, an inter- 
national medical journal. Of 24 patients in a 
test group who received the drug, only one got 
worse after a year, while four improved signif- 
icantly. Seven of 28 people who took a place- 
bo got significantly worse and one unproved. 


Brooklyn, killing two women, the police and 
witnesses said. The police said the shooting 
was apparently caused by a spurned romantic 
advance. Three other patrons were wounded, 
but their injuries were not critical, the police 
said. 

• Fiberglass insulation used in 90 percent of 
U,Si homes has been classified as a suspected 


• Two mens 
ing outside a 


unfire at a crowd stand - 
e New York borough of 


cancer-causing agent by the Department of 
Health and Human Services. But the agency 
cautioned the public not to become alarmed, 
saying it was perfectly safe when handled 
properly. lat, mt. ht 


USAirJet 
Crashes 
In Storm, 
Killing 37 

Compilfdby Our Staff Fnm Dispatches 

CHARLOTTE, North Caro- 
lina — A USAir jet crashed 
while trying to land in a thun- 
derstorm at the CharJotte- 
Douglas International Airport, 
killing 37 of the 57 people 
aboard. 

Survivors, including all five 
members of the crew, were tak- 
en to hospitals, the authorities 
said. Most of the injuries were 
from the impact, others were 
from burns and smoke inhala- 
tion. Many victims were report- 
ed in serious or critical condi- 
tion. 

Flight 1016. a DC-9, had 
originated in Columbia, South 
Carolina, and Charlotte was its 
final destination, said a USAir 
spokesman, Dave Shipley. 

Investigators are looking at 
several possible causes of the 
crash, including pilot error, me- 
chanical problems and weather. 
The crash occurred at about 
6:40 P.M. Saturday. 

The plane’s cockpit and 
flight data recorders were re- 
covered. 

Kathleen Bergen, public af- 
fairs manager for the Federal 
Aviation Administration in At- 
lanta, said that Tor some reason, 
the plane was unable to land on 
an initial approach. Storms had 
reduced viability to about a 
mile. 

“They were trying to come 
out of the landin g attempt, to 
come around and by to land 
again” just before the crash, she 
said. 

The plane hit trees and 
sheared off the top of telephone 
poles. It broke into three pieces 
after hitting the ground less 
than half a mile from the run- 
way, according to the airport 
director, Jerry Orr. 

The U.S. secretary of trans- 
portation, Federico F. Pcfia, 
visited the crash site and said: 
“When you have over two years 
of a safety record without any 
deaths in a large commercial 
airline, you feu good about 
that. But we always learn from 
these accidents and we try to 
improve our safety record and 
hopefully, we will learn from 
this. We are very thankful that 
there are so many survivors." 

(AP, Reuters) 


on CBS television vide space for ref 
ty, Mr. Gray Mid whom are fleeing 


SSHSiS Health Bill Advances Minus Clinton Component 


tions there change. 

Recent, talk, of invasion is, 
sparking congressional debate. 


president -has responsibility to In a CBS television interview, 
protect American lives, ana we Senator John S. McCain, Re- 
have an embassy down there p u bl i ca n of Arizona, said inva- 
with staff, and m light of the non would “be a terrific mis- 


wwiiflting human rights viola- 'take.” 

tions, there is great amcem that However, Senator Bob Gra- 

we must be prepared to protect ham. Democrat of Honda, said 


America n citizens. 


that if the ultimate threat of 


Mr. Gray also appeared to invasion is discarded, “our near 
encourage a coup, by appealing neighbors” will be subjected to 
to-Hai&an military officers to “an unending reign of terror.” 


By Dana Priest 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The Senate Fi- 
nance Committee became the last of five 
congressional committees to finish work 
on a health care bill, paving the way for the 
full Senate and House to debate the unusu- 
ally complex and comprehensive legisla- 
tion. 

On a 12-to-8 vote, the influential panel 
became the only committee to pass 3 bill 
with significant bipartisan support, but 
doing so required it to abandon the ccn ter- 
pieoes of President Bill Clinton’s plan: 
mandatory employer insurance payments 
and fall-back cost controls that would 
guarantee universal coverage in the near 
future. 

Instead, the Finance bill uses govern- 


ment insurance subsidies for the poor, 
changes in insurance laws and market in- 
centives to achieve coverage of 95 percent 
of the population by 2002. 

If the voluntary measures fail, a national 
commission would recommend mandatory 
methods to achieve that goai, and Con- 
gress would have a limited amount of time 
to change or reject those recommenda- 
tions. 

The Finance Committee is seen as repre- 
sentative of Congress as a whole, and its 
vole Saturday provided further evidence 
that Clinton-style reform is in trouble. 

“I’m verv proud of it," the committee 
chairman, Senator Daniel Patrick Moyni- 
han. Democrat of New York, said of the 
bill that, after last-minute rewriting by a 
bipartisan group of moderates, now ap- 


pears as close to the main Senate Republi- 
can alternative as it does to the white 
House plan. 

“I had to trade, that’s called legislation.” 

He added, “After 50 years, we might get 
health reform.” 

Mr. Clinton praised the process. “Chair- 
man Moynihan has worked diligently to 
make sure his committee produced the bill 
to debate on the Senate floor." 

Some committee Democrats who voted 
to approve the measure repeatedly said 
they disliked its main provisions but warn- 
ed to keep the legislative process moving. 

Congressional leaders will now try to 
meld the separate committee bills and pre- 
sent new versions for debate and votes by 
the entire House and Senate. 


Was the Simpson Search Warranted? 

Defense Focuses on Banning Evidence Taken by Police 


By Christine Spolar 

Washaagtan Post Service 

LOS ANGELES — It is a 
terse, sometimes clumsily writ- 
ten request from a police detec- 
tive for court permission to 
search the bouse of a man 
whose front walk is swtted 
with blood and whose vehicle is 
daubed with blood, just hours 
after his former , wife was 
.stabbed to death. . • . . 


AMERICAN 

TOPICS 

hi the Fight Against Grime, 
NewAiial^ 

A device that, according to its in ven- 
tor, measures involuntary frequency 
modulations in the hu man voice, has 
been used to obtain 17 confessions m 
homicide cases and make arrests m doz- 
ens of other killings since the 
Washington began using it in September, 
The Washington Post reports. 

Data from the device, called a voice 
analyzer, are not admissible m coart, 
unless the defense; prosecution and 
' iudge agree, Although some pofice de- 
partments prefer the conventional hedc- 
tector, which usually measures Wood 
pressure, heart rate and resmrauon, the 
voice analyzer is increasingly in use. 

Police officers arica suspect a series of 
yes or no questions. The response are 

person being questioned. But unlike the 


standard lie detector, it is not attached to 
the person. 5 ' 

So far, hboaride detectives have used 
the machine on 124 witnesses or sus- 
pects. Of those, 95 were found to have 
high levels of stress indicating deception 
.in one or more of their responses, lieu- 
tenant James Bolder of the homicide 

squad said- Thora 95 were shown- the test 

results, and 37 of them admitted they 
were lying and either confessed or pro- 
vided information about homicides, he 
said. ... 

The voice analyzer, which fits into a 
briefcase, has been used by law enforce- 
ment agencies since the mid-1980s, said 
rharies Humble, inventor of the $7,000 
device. He said more than 500 law en- 
forcement agencies worldwide use it. 

ShortTakes 

Using a rope made of dental Ooss, a 

prisoner seated an 18-foot (5-5-meterj 
fail fence in Sonth Charleston, West Vir- 
ginia. Robert Sherwood, 34, a robbery 
suspect, braided the floss to the thickness 
of a telephone cord. At last report, Mr. 
Sheruwid was stifl ai large, and dental 
floss has been taken off .the shelves at the 
jafl store- ' 


Which school has had die most Rhodes 
scholars who earned letters in intercolle- 
giate sports? Dartmouth, with 24, the 
Los Angeles Times reports, one more 
than Harvard. 


About People 


That affidavit, which trig- they retrieved there can be al- 
gered a search warrant that ai- lowed in court, 
lowed Los Angeles Police detec- The police have the right to 

tives to enter OJ. Simpson's enter houses or properties with- 
home and take away a blood- out warrants m cases where 
soaked glove and nearly three they believe evidence will be de- 
dozen other meces of evidence, stroyed or if they are on a res- 
is the focus of a high-stakes le- cue mission or m pursuit of a 
gal dispute. suspect Based on court docu- 

At issue is how and why the roents, it is unclear what the 
polka entered Mr. Simpson’s police were thinking or doing 
home and whether evidence when they were at Mr. Simp- 
son’s bouse in suburban Brent- 
memmmmmemummmmmmmmm wood early on June 13. 

4 M idl M .t»hiu. n MW M bc Thesecond wedc of a bearing 
moot has am the most Rooties t0 determine whether Mr. 

Simpson should be tried on 
.8. Dartmouth, with 24, the murder charges will begin Tues- 

es Times reports, one more day. His attorney, Robert L. 
ara * Shapiro, is prepared to argue 

that Mr. Simpson’s consutu- 
gople tional rights were violated by 

* policemen who searched his 

o- .. t T . _ home hours after finding the 

Mr- X( L i6b S F ' bodies of Nicole Brown Simp- 

and Ronald Goldman, 
campaign m 1946 until his w ,, , . 

iHasrn 1963, said last week on Mr. Shapiro alleged last 

er 30 years as curator of the week, in a motion to suppress 
lennedy Library in Boston, evidence, that six hours before a 

ras the best of two worlds, warrant was issued to search 
the White House under Jack Mr. Simpson s property, a de- 
museum under Jackie. The scaled a 5-foot (1.5-me- 

my wall are aB joyful, but the ter) wall on the property and 

f heart are sad/ opened a locked gate to let in 

three other detectives. 

lodham CEnton says that her If Mr. Shapiro’s motion is 
is “a bad rap” when it comes successful, it could ban much of 

ation as a junk-food afibona- the evidence that has been dis- 

riband has good rating hab- cussed in the Los Angeles Crim- 

d during a White House cere- Inal Courts Building during the 
fainting June as National preliminary hearing. The evi- 
fegetable Month. “He really pence mentioned includes 
resh fruits and vegetables." blood splotches found on the 
t food President BtQ Clinton door handle, the steering wheel, 
die said, “Well, everything.” the instrument pane) and the , 
Wien al Herald Tribune. floor of a Ford BfOUCO used by 

... — - Mr. Simpson. 



< 


Dave Powers, 82, an aide to John F. 
i Kennedy from the time of his first Coo- 
j gressional campaign in 1946 until his 
death in Dallas in 1963, said last week on 
[ retiring after 30 yean as curator of the 
1 John F. Kennedy Library in Boston, 
“My Kfe was the best erf two worlds, 
serving in the White House under Jack 
and in the museum under Jackie. The 
pictures on my wall are all joyful but the 
ones in my heart are sad 5 * 

HBfcuy Rodham CEnton says that her 
husband gets “a bad rap” when it comes 
to his reputation as a junk-food aficiona- 
do. “My husband has good rating hab- 
its,” she said during a white House cere- 
mony proclaiming June as National 
Fruit and Vegetable Month. “He really 
does love fresh fruits and vegetables," 
Asked what food President B£Q Clinton 
likes best, she said “Well, everything." 

JmermtUmd Herald Tribute. 


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40 bojnsid Hai&vwin Pare 9 







Page 4 


MONDAY, JULY 4, 1994 


OPINION 


Jtcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc 


Pi-m.lMieu WITH Till. NKW TIM|.« *M‘ H'F WVKIHNI.TCW POST 


Transition in Tokyo? 


As an example of political cynicism, 
the new Japanese government is' breath- 
taking. It is cobbled together from the 
opposites of right and left — the most 
obdurate dements of the collapsing Lib- 
eral Democratic (that is. conservative) 
Party and their longtime adversaries the 
Socialists. The new prime minister. To- 
miichi Murayama, has spent his entire 
career in the opposition' supporting paci- 
fism. neutralism and other ideas that his 
current partners always derided as neither 
realistic nor safe. Some Japanese say the 
people in the new government have noth- 
ing in common beyond a yearning for 
power, but that is not quite true. There is 
one other thin g: hostility to the electoral 
reforms enacted earlier this year. 

Both of these long-established parties. 
Liberal Democrats and Socialists, know 
that Japanese society is changing in ways 
that do not favor them. The reforms, and 


particularly the sweeping redistricting 
would shif 


that they impose, would shift influence to 
voters who are younger, belter educated, 
less tolerant of political corruption and 
perhaps less content with Japan's con- 
strained standard of living. 

To call this government unstable is to 
put it mildly. It arrives at a time when 
the country's economy is already under 
great strain and the absence of firm lead- 
ership may prove expensive. The rapid 
rise of the yen’s exchange rate is not a 


sign of health, but precisely the opposite. 

Americans have been wondering why 
their own currency seems to be falling at 
a time when the American economy is 
perfor ming well. Now i! is beginning to 
be clear that the dollar isn't falling. It is 
down a little against some currencies, up 
a little against others, and trading in 
normal ranges against all but one — 
Japan's. It’s the yen that is out of control. 

Japan is running a big trade surplus 
that can continue only as long as it can 
balance that surplus with an outflow of 
capital — in effect, lending its customers 
the money to keep buying. For many 
reasons, most of them related to a long 
recession and the fragile condition of the 
Japanese banking system, the outflow 
has dropped. The result is a yen shortage, 
and the yen's exchange rate is rising. That 
threatens to throw Japan back into a 
further and deeper recession, because the 
high exchange rale is making Japan’s 
exports expensive and uncompetitive. 

It is a bad time to have a government 
entirely preoccupied with parliamentary 
infighting. Japan’s friends, of whom there 
are many in the United States, must hope 
that the Murayama government proves to 
be only a brief transition to something 
sturdier and better able to make the sharp 
changes in policy that Japan will need in 
the gathering economic emergency. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Do More for Africa 


Africa was given unaccustomed atten- 
tion last week as the Clinton administra- 
tion held a two-day conference on the 
economic and political afflictions in 30 
countries south of the Sahara. But what 
the conference unintentionally highlight- 
ed was the low priority that Bill Clinton 
has given to a region whose enormous 
promise is blighted by declining econo 1 
mies and soaring fertility rates. 

The Cold Wax’s demise, however wel- « 
come elsewhere, has proved a setback for 


black Africa. Superpower rivalry once 
gave crucial purchase to poor lands with 


prized real estate for military bases, or a 
grip on maritime u choke points,’' or large 
reserves of strategic minerals. But with 
die Soviet- Amen can competition now 
over, the CIA is closing IS African sta- 
tions. Actual U.S. development aid to 
sub-Saharan Africa has tapered to 
around $800 billion this year, as the in- 
dustrialized world pumps an increasing 
share of multilateral development funds 
into the former Communist countries. As 
John Darn ton of The New York Times 
detailed in a recent series, Africa's lever- 
age has markedly weakened during a 
grim decade when its gross national pro- 
duct declined by 2 percent a year. 

A single figure underscores the disas- 
trous state of the region’s economy. Ex- 
cluding South Africa, the total output in 
1991 of all countries below the Sahara, 
with a combined population of nearly 
600 million, was roughly the same as the 
gross national product of Belgium, home 
of 10 million people. And as output 
plunged, the region’s foreign debt tripled, 
to $180 billion. Its population will double 
in 2$ years, further straining resources, if 


unforeseen windfall, South Africa, the 
region’s industrial powerhouse, has 
ceased to be an economic and political 
pariah after a peaceful democratic revo- 
lution brimming with promise. 

South Africa’s salutary transforma- 
tion is the region’s most stirring event 
since the postcolonial surge to indepen- 
dence 30 years ago. Not only has apart- 
heid been revoked, but President Nelson 
Mandela has shown how to turn bitter 
adversaries into political allies, provid- 
ing a model for African states polarized 
by ethnic and political rivalries. And if 
Pretoria really opens its own frontiers to 
freer trade, it could jump-start stalled 
economies elsewhere. 

Given a spell of peace and trade across 
open frontiers, plus the stimulus of a doz- 
en new stock markets, sub-Saharan Afri- 
ca's economy could grow by 3.9 percent a 
year in the coming decade, according to 
forecasts by the World Rarik But Africa is 
not a machine that can accelerate by itself; 
it needs the help of a world that has been 
too quick to take profits out of Africa and 
too slow to extend a helping hand. 

Africa’s imm ediate needs include debt 
forgiveness or at least a generous resched- 


uling of loans it cannot possibly repay, 
r small-scale development 


the^preseni fertility rates continue. 


tone of this justifies passivity or de- 
spair. Sub-Saharan Africa boasts far 
more arable land and mineral riches 
than other poor regions. And, in an 


seed money for 
rather than big-ticket prestige projects 
coveted by dictators, and aggressive di- 
plomacy to help end wars and promote 
democratic reforms. 

The Clinton administration justifies 
the relative penury of its African devel- 
opment programs by pointing to com- 
peting needs. Maybe so. But that excuse 
cannot explain the absence of a single 
high-profile appointee to serve as an 
advocate and goad to conscience. Africa 
has fallen into the lap of anonymous 
bureaucrats and stagers of conferences. 
It deserves far better. 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Play by the Trade Rules 


Although more than 100 countries 
signed the world trade agreement last 
ApriL its terms are not yet entirely firm. 


For American courts and anyone doing 

final 


business in the United States, the fii 
word will not be the text of the agree- 
ment but rather the implementing legis- 
lation now before Congress. A great 
struggle has begun over the precise 
wording of that legislation. The protec- 
tionist industries are pushing hard to 
regain in the congressional bill what 
they lost in the international negotia- 
tions. The fiercest struggles are over the 
obscure, technical and crucial provi- 
sions known as the anti-dumping rules. 

Anti-dumping rules were first written 
long ago to prevent predatory pricing — 
the practice of selling at artificially low 
prices to drive competitors out of busi- 
ness. Today dumping is broadly defined 
as selling abroad below the price at 
home, or selling below the cost of pro- 
duction. That looks reasonable enough 
until you read the definitions of those 
phrases, and the way that the compari- 
sons are calculated. Then you see that 
over the years the anti-dumping laws 
have become sharply biased against im- 
ports, in favor of domestic producers. 

A lot of congressmen think it’s O.K. 
to whack the foreigners with dumping 
penalties as long as it can be done dis- 
creetly, without much public notice. The 


trouble is that it is not the foreigners 
who pay. It is American businesses 
which use imported components and, in 
the end, American consumers. 

The new trade agreement — the latest 
revision in the General Agreement on 
Tariffs and Trade — makes only limited 
improvements, unfortunately, in the 
dumping codes. But those improve- 
ments are not insignificant, and they are 
richly resented by American industries 
like steel that are accustomed to protec- 
tion from foreign competition. 

If those industries succeed in distort- 
ing the implementing legislation, Amer- 
ican trade law will not be consistent 
with the international agreement. For- 
eign countries could bring legal com- 
plaints, but that is the least of iL Much 
more dangerous, foreign countries 
would immediately copy the American 
laws. It is happening already. 

Thai means phony dumping charges 
against American exports abroad, mod- 
eled after the phony dumping charges 
against foreign imports m America. 
That is serious trouble for a country 
which is depending on exports to keep 
its economy growing. This trade agree- 
ment promises progress in restricting 
the misuse of the dumping laws. It 
would be a great pity to let the protec- 
tionists’ lobbying undo that promise. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



International Herald Tribune 

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RICHARD McCLEAN. PiMvcher A Chirf Eimuivr 
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r A gun! I promise youivon’t be invoked, honest — gimme agun!T 



W ASHINGTON — Robert Fiske’s con- 
clusions regarding Vincent Foster’s 
tragic suicide constitute a definitive repudia- 
tion oC the morbid speculations that began 
last July 20 and flourish to this day. 

Mr. Fiske, the special prosecutor in the 
Whitewater affair, deployed forensic talent 
enough to solve a crime wave, only to reach a 
conclusion that seemed obvious from the 
first. Mr. Foster, the deputy White House 
counsel, was seriously depressed and killed 
himself. Seriously depressed people often do. 

Mr. Fiske found “no evidence” that mat- 
ten relating to Whitewater or Madison Guar- . 
anty “played any role.” That theory of the 
suicide was repeatedly merchandised by Wil- 
liam Safire in his New York Times columns. 

And.no, Mr. Foster was not murdered by 
administration officials or a foreign “hit 


By Edwin M- Yoder Jr. 


After extensive intqwws, Mr. Fiske also 
says that Wall Street Jddraal editorial attacks 
intensified Mr. Foster’s distress. And what 
great issue provoked the Journal's barrage? 
“Travdgate,” so called, the firing of seven 
employees of the White House travel office, 
which on any priority list of urgent matters of 
state would rank about 12*211. However 
tinged with cronyism, the mistakes of “Tra- 
velgate” were soon rectified. Suicide is perma- 
nent. Worst of all, Mr. Foster himsrif had 


very little to do with the travel office firings. 
Apart ‘ 


squad”; nor was his body transferred from a 
mer Watergate tough guy 


“safe house.” The former 
G. Gordon Iiddy, now (what else?) a radio 
talk-show host, gave credence to a bizarre 
rumor that the man who found Mr. Foster's 
body saw no gun. The story, with accompany- 
ing insinuations of foul play, was even given 
credence by the col umnis t Robert Novak. 

The interaction of Vincent Foster’s blame- 
less life and tragic death with cowboy journal- 
ism is surely, for those in my trade, too most 
depressing aspect of the affair. In almost four 
decades as a journalist, I have not seen its like 
for morbid irresponsibility. 


from journalistic McCanhyism, the 
most troubling aspect of the tragedy was the 
failure of Mr. Foster’s friends to detect and act 
upon signs of depression. Mr. Fiske has enu- 
merated the wdHowwn symptoms: sleepless- 
ness. loss of appetite, weight loss, a tendency to 
lose perspective on matters large and small, 
suicidal feelings. Mr. Foster exhibited them alL 

Had Vincent Foster collapsed of a heart 
attack, be would have been hospitalized un- 
der skilled medical care. Instead be shied 
away from the psychiatric consultation urged 
by ms sister, fearing that it might impair his 
security dearance or damage his professional 
reputation back home in Little Mick. 

Maybe, too, he remembered what hap- 
pened to Senator Tom Eagleton of Missouri, 
who was summarily dumped from the 1972 


Useful Questions About the Partnership for Peace 


W ASHINGTON — Dick Lu- 
gar, the Republican senator 
Democrats listen to on foreign 
policy, is back with a sharp com- 
plaint that the so-called Partner- 
ship for Peace, is “an artful 
dodge." He has a point. 
Par tn ers hi p, intended partly to 


By Stephen S. Rosenf eld 


“great 


answer his own call last year to 
)f the old 


take a few key countries ofthe old 
Eastern Europe into NATO, of- 
fered military cooperation and 
consultation to all the slates of 
the former Soviet empire. Some 
21 of the 27 cbgibles, including 
Russia, have picked up the offer. 
To the widespread protest that 
partnership is second-class, the 
administration responds that it 
would surely lead to full member- 


ship, some day, under terms and a 
timetable to be determined. 


elegantly, that 
‘ "’At the 


Mr. Lugar say 
this is not 
moment, 
a maneuver 
every European 

NATO in a weak military ex- 
change focusing on the marginal 
at the expense of the critical. The 



ntiy 

min t 


NATO club is now implausibly 
being held open to everyone, even 
those who have no need for mem- 
bership and may ultimately weak- 
en the alliance.” 

Like, for instance, Russia, 
which accepted partnership, even 
while various Russians grumbled 
that it was pushing NATO’s secu- 
rity border provocatively east- 
ward, cutting into Russia's arms 
markets and, worst for its pride, 
making Russia stand not only “in 
the hallway" but in the haflway 
with lesser others. Makes you 
wonder why they accepted. 

Central Europe thinks it 
knows. Russia joined the partner- 
ship — Poland, Hungary, the 
Czech Republic and Slovakia sus- 
pv — to crowd them, to use its 
heavyweight status to reassert 
great-power claims. In the inner 
ear of the alarmed rings the bell 
of “Yalta IF — a repeat turn of 
the American back on nations in 
the vulnerable middle zone be- 
tween Germany and Russia. 


Cut through the fog, says Mr. 
Lugar. Take tire Poles, Hungar- 
ians, Czechs and Slovaks off the 
“ride track” of . partnership and 
put them cu the “fast trade” of a 
specific schedule far associate and 
then full NATO membership. 

Wd3, yes. This is the way to 
integrate worthy and nervous 
Central Europeans into Western 
structures. It is good for them and 
for their democratic and free- 
market aspirations. 

It is also good for Russia; a 
friendly but waxy neighboring re- 
gion (Central Europe) made un- 
stable by being left m a geopolit- 
ical vacuum would become a 
friendly but wary neighboring re- 
gion made stable by having its 
fundamental moorings secured. 

Meanwhile, Russia can befairr 
ly accommodated and stroked.. 
This is necessary, and it is already 
starting to happen. It is being 
brought into its own special con- 
sultancy with NATO on the basis 
of its undeniable extra dimension 


An Anti-Rabin Campaign in America 


N EW YORK — Thad Coch- 
ran, 


Republican senator 
from Mississippi, thought he 
was doing Israel a favor when 
he agreed to sponsor an amend- 
ment to the defense authoriza- 
tion bill calling for an evalua- 
tion of the risks of deploying 
U.S. peacekeeping troops on the 
Golan Heights. Only a last-min- 
ute call from a pro-Israel lobby- 
ist alerted him to the fact that he 
had been, as he said in a cha- 
grined statement last week, “mis- 
takenly informed.” 

Israeli officials say they would 
welcome full discusson in Wash- 
ington of a Golan deployment, 
but only after Israel and Syria 
agree to ask for one. Premature 
debate, they warn, could sour the 
negotiating atmosphere. Senator 
Cochran withdrew his amend- 
ment at the lobbyist's request 
For months, Israeli and Syrian 
ne gotiator s have informally dis- 
cussed U.S. peacekeepers as an 
important dement in a peace 
treaty. A similar force has been 
deployed in the Sinai without 
incident since the Israeli- Egyp- 
tian accord took effect in 1981. 

Congressional support for the 
Israeli government is threatened 
not by anti-Israel or pro-Arab 
lobbyists but by a coalition of 
Jewish rightists, conservative Re- 
publicans and allies of Israel’s 
Likud opposition party, all of 
whom oppose the government's 
peace policies. Their favorite tac- 
tic is to “protect” Israel by 
erecting new walls between Isra- 
el and its enemies as Jerusalem 
pursues reconciliation. By pre- 
senting their efforts as hdpful to 


By J. J. Goldberg 


Israel, they enlist legislators who. 
favor the peace process but are 
loath to alienate Jewish groups. 

On the Golan issue, Jewish 
rightists and their allies, notably 
Senator Alfonse D’ Amato, have 
for months attempted to com- 
pare a U.S. troop deployment on 
the Golan to America's disas- 
trous experience in Somalia. 

In May, a bipartisan congres- 
sional “peace accord monitor- 
ing group” was set up by the 
Zionist Organization of Ameri- 
ca, a Likud affiliate. Its appar- 
ent aim is to discredit IsraeTs 
Pales tinian negotiating partners 
by exporing Palestinian viola- 
tions that Prime Minister Yitz- 
hak Rabin dismisses or ignores. 

The group numbers 15 sena- 
tors and 31 representatives, in- 
cluding such liberal Democrats 
as Representatives Charles 
Schumer, Nha Lowey and EEot 
Engel of New York and Senator 
Frank Lautenberg of New Jer- 
sey. Mr. Schumer, whose Brook- 
lyn constituents form an impor- 
tant base of opposition in 
America to Mr. Rabin’s policies, 
has introduced legislation, op- 



boycott 

Israel “That would make the ur- 
gent repair of the Gaza sewage 
system hostage to a symbolic is- 
sue that will go away much lat- 
er,” an Israeli diplomat said. 

Israeli officials initially dis- 
missed such maneuvers as a mi- 
nor irritant or welcomed them as 


strengthening Israel's negotiat- 
ing hand. But the visibility of the 
Jewish right on Capitol Hill is 
creating anxiety in Jerusalem. 

When Likud was in power, 
Jewish groups that threatened to 
work against Israeli policy were 
generally kept in fine by the 
American Israel Public Affairs 
Committee and the Conference 
of Presidents of Major American 
Jewish Organizations. Since Mr. 
Rabin took office in 1992, these 
groups have largely dropped 
their disciplinary tpctkfr. - - 
With Jerusalem paralyzed and 
the central American Jewish or- 
ganizations divided or passive; 
some members of Congress have 
co nc luded that a few noisy xniB- 
tants reflect Jewish opinion. 

.. This is not the case. A poll 
conducted in May by Stanley 
G reenberg and Nuuk Mdbnan 
for the load Policy Forum, a 
pro-Rabin group based in Man- 
hattan, showed 78 percent of 
American Jews favoring the 
Gazat- Jericho autonomy agree- 
ment and 9 percent opposing iL 
Two-thirds said American 
Jewish organizations should do 
“a lot” to support the peace pro- 
cess. Most telling, 84 percent 
said they were “hopeful" about 
the process, whDe 50 percent said 
were “fearful" 
mainstream American Jews 
do not mobilize to support the 
peace process, a nnhtant minor- 
ity mu keep sowing suspicion. 


The writer is preparing a book 
on American Jewish community 


politics. He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


as what Mr. Lugar calls a 
European power.” 

The sober virtue of Mr. Lugar’s 
analysis is that it departs from 
the one-world dreams that filled 
many people's hopes when the 
Soviet bloc and its Communist 
ideology dissolved. It returns to 
a more realistic framework in 
which nations assert conflicting 
interests but agree to moderate 
and reconcile them. Call it not a 
return to the Cold War but a 
reassertion of good, faithful geo- 
political principles whose bene- 
fits are available to all corners. - 
- But thorny practical issues 
must still be encountered. Take 
the unclear question. NATO’s 
current non-nuclear members en- 
joy an American (and perhaps 
also a French and British) nuclear 
guarantee. It is implicit in tire 
- affiance's Van attack on one is an 
attack on all” origins and explicit 
in itsmiliiaiy planning. The guar- 
antee was given, however; at a 
momentafter World War H wheat 
America’s sense of strength and 
-massm mooted the sort of grave 
detailed deliberation that would 
be expected now. ' 

Is the Senate ready, at a mo- 
ment when the United States is 
plainly in a mood of global re- 
trenchment, actually to -‘extend 
American security responsibil- 
ities and to raise the nuclear um- 
brella over Poland and the rest? - 
Mr. Lugar thinks “yes” but ac- 
knowledges that such a 


might slow the “fast 



i fact, it doesn't seem a nucle- 
ar fear that drives tire Pedes but a: 
political anxiety that can be 
soothed by assurances short of nu- 
clear. But all this must be winked 
out. And it isn't just whether 
NATO is ready. Are ihe Central 
Europeans ready? Senator Lugar 
forces these essential questions. 

The Washington Post. ~ • ' 


Criminals 
Should Be 
Found Out * 


If 


«i' 


d 


P 




By Anthony Lewis 


1 0NDON — "There ran be no 
/amnesty fra war criminals,” 
David Owen, international medi- 
ator in the Yugoslav conflict, said 
last year. “J believe the moral 
order of this world isrinarred if 
those who are guilty of war crimes 
are not brought to justice.” 

The UN Security Council voted 
.16 mouths ago to set up a War 
Crimes Tribunal for tire former 
Yugoslavia. To date no prosecu- 
tion has been brought, and many 
wonder whether any of tire mur- 
derers and torturers who have rav- 
aged Bosnia will ever be tried. 

In fact, a good deal of progress 
has been made in establishing the 
court and gathering potential evi- 
dence, First indictments are ex- 
pected by September or October. 

The tribunal has 11 judges from 
around the world, "chosen by the 
General Assembly, lie court has 
rules of evidence and is 


indicl- 


Deznocratic ticket when it was , revealed that 
he had once undergone electroshock therapy. 

Mr. Foster persuaded a physician friend m 
Little Rock to prescribe anti-depressants. It 
did not help and may have hurt. A psycho- 
therapist tens me: “Unsupervised medication 
is always dangerous. It may have given him 
just enough strength of mind to end his life.” 

I am not hopeful that tire Foster tragedy 
will iznprove journalism, or arrest tire cosh 
firming slide into partisan savagery and cal- 
umny. Washington wffl be Washington. Mr. 
Fiske’s report may, however, alert more peo- 
ple to the dangers of depression. In its clinical 
farms, this is a fife-threatening disorder and 
strikes even the sanest, sometimes with little 
wanting. It is treatable and curable, but no 
mare to be trifled with than cancer. 

No one has done more to deepen public 
understanding of clinical depression than the 
novelist W illiam Styrou, to whom the Clin- 
tons turned last summer on Martha’s Vine- 
yard as they sought to come; to terms with 
tireir dose friend's shattering death! In a 
small bock entitled “Darkness Visible," Mi 
Seyran has unforgettably described his own 
bout with a suicidal depression. 

Regrettably, Mr. Styron’s humane and 
moving book, so pertinent to the real Foster 
stray, has gained far less notice than the 
ghoulish fantasies circulated -by journalists 
who ought to know better. . 

Washington Part Writers Group. 


.to recave 
ments at its seat in 

What thesystepa lacks so far is a 
chief prosecutor. The Security 
Council picked a Venezuelan late 
last year, but after, a brief time he 


m Venezuela. Slice then the coun- 
cil, which decided to require a v 
unanimous vote fra tire choice, has*'. 


not been able to agree. 

. - But events need not wait on a 
rfijgf prosecutor. There is a depu- 
ty, Graham Blewitt of Australia, 
and the tribunal reportedly re-' 
him as empowered to act in 
_ absence of a chief . 

The accumulation of what could 
be called evidentiary leads is well 
under way. lire United States has 
turned over to Mr. Kewiu about 
450 reports of refugee interviews, 
describing atrocities or in some 
cases actually admitting to having 
- committed than. Another 200 are 
to be sent soon. 

A tLS. team is preparing a de- 
tailed report on what may be the 
most vicious and concentrated 
“ethnic cleansing” by tire Serbs, in 
the Prijedor area of northern Bos- 
nia. It will cover, the period from 
April to July 1992, naming Serbian 
nulitary units and their- officers 
and gping up tire chain of com- 
mand to political leaders. 

Investigations following up the 
refugee interview and other leads 
axe under way, with the first due to 
be completed this summer. Then 
the prosecutor ' can bring indict- 
ments with a judges approval 
- Undra the UN resolution set- 
ting up the tribunal, every country 4-. 
is obliged to turn over indicted' 9 
individuals. If they are Serbs, for 
example, bow can Serbia or the 
Bosnian Serbs be persuaded to do 
so? One lever is sanctions. The 
United States believes that a fail- 
ure to produce suspected war 
criminals should influence the lift- 
ing of sanctions on Serbia. 

A more extreme option would 
be punitive measures like those 
imposed onTiltya for its failure to 
produce fra trial the suspects in 
tire bombing of Pan Am 103. . 

In tire m eantime, governments 
all over are being asked to keep an . 
eye out for any suspected war- 
criminals who attempt to leave 
framer Yugoslavia. If that wqiks, 
they win in effect be coufined:to ' 
their home areas. Germany, Den- 
mark and Switzerland have 'al- 
ready arrested suspects and ait 
httidmg tiMmi fra trial there or by 
tire international tribunal. 

In tire cud, (he success of this 
attempt to hold individuals re- ' 
sponsible fra the appalling brutal: . 
itres in Bosnia will of course .be a. 
test of international pofitical wilL ■ 
One early indication will be 
whether the UN General 'Assem- 
bly approves an adequate budget 
for the tribunal next fall -J .<7. 

The Clinton administration has 
done its part — and more than any 
other country. It has. provided - 
funds and 21 U.S. officials tohelp . 
tire tribunal: lawyers, investigar.^p 
tore, intelligence experts.- ‘ - - . • " 
Last month a UN commission 
reported on the honors that have 
accompanied Serbian aggression ' 
in Bosnia: rapes, murders, whole- 
sale terrorization. To ignore such, 
known facts would be an interna 
.tional disaster. -The constituency 
of the War Crimes' Tribunal Ma- 
ddrineAlbright the U.S. delegate 
to. tire United. Nations, sad last ' 
month, “is the cavilraed world.” 

The New York Tones. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: AltheEfysee 

PARIS — It is stated tha t Mine 
Carnot wfl] leave the Palace of 
the Elysfee towards the middle of 


njoct week, probably. Thursday. 

' she 

may leave even sooner. The date 


It is possible, however, that 
may leave even sooner. The 'd___ 
of young M. Carnot's marriage 
with Mile. Chins, the banns of 


can Army and Navy af tireHStd 
de -Ville. M. Evaaa, president of 
the Paris Municipal Council, said 
in. a speech to General Pershing 
and Admiral Knapp that the 
Fourth of July, the American Tn- 
■ dependence Day, will be 1 hence- 
forth to tire French like tire dawn 
of their Fourteenth of July f&tes. 


. which were published the day 
the President was assassinated, 
has not yet been fixed. It will 


1944: 


probably be postponed until the 
autumn. Mine. Carnot has al- 


ready intimated that she will not 
accept any pension which may 
be voted by the Chambers. 


ADVANCED ALLIED HEAD- 
QUATERS — [From our New 
York edition:] Leapfrogging 100 


miles closer u> the muippmes,* 
General Douglas MacArthur’s* 


1919: AmOTcans Feted 


PARIS — The Independence 
Day celebrations began. in Paris, 
yesterday [July 3] when tire city 
authorities received General Per- 
shint Admiral Knapp, and a 
number of officers of the Ameri- 


sbock troops landed on tiny 
Noemfoor Island, off Dutch New 
Guinea era Sunday. (July 2] and 
within two hows captured plane- 
littered Kaxniri airdrome, most 
important of three Japanese air- 
strips there. Allied troops thus 
moved in next door to the last 
important Japanese base on the 
New Guinea mainland. 


PTT5 











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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 4, 1994 


Page 5 


opinion 


Tell It Straight to North Korea 



1SJ^T°IUC —The most voni. 

i/SJ **>* <*»* over 

tte North. Korean’ miclear weapons' 
program is that, with eachW 
fomrtof d^omacvy America’s ne- 
?5™6 portion has been weak- 
en«L And smee credibility is the 
cunewgr of diplomacy, the options 
mve become starker, bringing into 
view the choice of cither acquies- 
cence- in a North Korean nuclear' 
weapons capability or a ma or crisis. 

Inl991, the Bush administration, 
concerned over the posable diver- 
sion of nudear materi als, brokered a 
toMomerad arrangement among 
Seoul, Pyongyang and Washington 
in order to in d u c e Pyongyan g to 
adhere to tbeNudear NonproSfcra- 
tion Treaty, whkhi h bad signed in 
1985, Seoul and Pyongyang pp yt gpd 
that they would not possess, mam*- 
facturc or use nudear weapons or 
plutonium reprocessing facilities; 

: China, Japan and South 
Korea have been taking a 
free ride, hoping America 
would assume the risks in 
solving thejr problems . 

. they agreed to negotiate a system of 
North-South nuclear inspections. 

In January 1992, Undersecretary 
of State Arnold Kanxor held a first 
high-level contact with a Neath Kore- 
an representative in New York. The 
United States announced the with- 
drawal <rf its tactical nudearweapons 
from Korea as part of a global rede- 
ployment. Washington and Seoul 
canceled their nnnnaf “Team Spirit'" 
military exercise for 1992. 

The agreements ram* imgHwi al- 
most immediately. In June 19% the 
North refused to cany out the agreed 
mutual North-South nudear inspec- 
tions — probably on the ground that 
Korean inspectors would be more 
knowledgeable than international 
ones, or perhaps because, with U-S. 
nudear weapons withdrawn, k bad 
achieved its uritial goal 

Although it did agree to allow 
mternatumal inspections by the Txt-, 
temational Atomic Energy Agency, 
it confined these to acknowledged 
North Korean nuclear facilities; it 
denied penrnsaon to. inspect two. 
suspected rites, including what the 
IAEA charged was a kigephrtozu- 
um reprocessing plant at Yongbyon. 

At the end of 1992, the. North, 
brake off nudear inspection talks 
with South Korea altogether arid be- 
gan to delay and harass IAEA in- 


By Henry A- Kissinger 

^spections. Wh.ea,inMarcfr 1993. the 
IAEA pressed tor ‘‘special inspfib- 
tion5”ofthe two^u^ecred nuclear 
waste jjtfl^ Pyovgyaiig declared that 
it intended trT withdraw from the* 

The Clinton administration has 
l these inherited tfifficul- 
ties.by fifling toiSgjJain, or perhaps 
to tmdexstanH, _tbe nature (rfhsprcA>- 
Ion. If, after mucfcAmerican huffing 
and puffmg North 7 Korea- anerges 
with a nudear weapons capacity, or 
a capability that it can rapidly acti- 
vate,- stability in. Asia. America's 
role in Aria arid nonproliferation 
wflT an be gravely jeopardized. 

The American troops in South Ko- 
rea, shorn cf. their tactical nudear 
sfafekk; win find themselves in a pre- 
-caripos position. SoutbKorea wifi be 
tested to develop nuclear weapons 
cf its own. Japan,: within range of 
North Korean ririsriks, will acceter- 
atehsownnncfearweaponsandimH- 
tary program. C2unawul speed up its 
preparedness. Industrialized natrons 
of Southeast Aria, and perhaps Tai- 
wan, will start their own nodCT pro- 
grams. Rogue states tike Ban wifi be 
encouraged to join the parade. 

The ad minist ration, response has 
emphasized a bilatera l diplomacy 
focused cm abstruse issues c^ inspec- 
tkm that has obscured the threat to 
vital American interests. 

To be sure, the diplomatic envi- 
ronmeut hasnrt^w 1 «^enial . AI- 

have even more to lose from a nucle- 
ar North Korea than 7 the United 
States, they seem not to perceive 
their dries that way in practice. 

‘ China and O^pan prefer a divided 
Korea and .xmgnt see in a modest 
North.Koreim nuclear capability a 
means to gnaraatce iL Arid Japan 
may look for an-cacose to accelerate 
. its own nudear program. Seoul may 
be tempted by the prospect of inher- 
iting the North’s nudear capability 
after eventual unification. 

These countries have been taking 
a free ride; hoping that. America 
would assume the rides in solving 
their prriblez&s, while being pre- 
pared to blame it for an unsatisfac- 
tory outcome." ; 

For its part, - the administration 
has oscillated among its options, 
stating purposes achievable only by 
confrontation while recoding bom 
defending the many lines it has 
drawn in the sand. - 

In 1993 x the U.S. position was 
that North Korea had to reverse its 
withdrawal from the nonprolifera- 


tion treaty and accept the fill! IAEA 
inspection system, suspect rites in- 
. duded- Since then the U.S. position 
has been watered down to asking 
that North Korea only suspend its 
withdrawal and only discuss inspec- 
tions of the seven declared rites. The 
demand for inspections of the two 


most significant retreat has 
been from the president’s statement 
of last Nov. T that “North Korea 
cannot be allowed to develop a nu- 
dear bomb."' By Jan. 5, an unidenti- 
fied official explained that the presi- 
dent had “misspoken” and that the 
North needed only to stopi develop- 
ing its capability further. 

in other words. North Korea 
could keep the perhaps two nudear 
bombs, that intelligence believes it 
may have built prior. to 1992, and 
maintain the capacity to produce 
plutonium, which the IAEA esti- 
mates has doubled since 1992. Ac- 
quiescing in what existed would 
make North Korea a nudear power 
even if in any one year it desisted 
from reprocessing its plutonium. 

These retreats may have given 
Pyongyang the idea that it could 
stall indefinitely. Despite a U.S. of- 
fer to cancel “Team Spirit” perma- 
nently IF the North accepted IAEA 
inspections, in March Pyongyang 
refused any IAEA inspections. And 
in May it began to remove enough 
phitomum from its reactor that, if 
rqpropessed, i! would yidd five to 
seven nudear weapons. 

* Finally, in June 1994 the adminis- 
tration decided to explore, almost 
apologetically, sanctions against 
North Korea so tentative and essen- 
tially meaningless that they conveyed 
hesitation rather than determination. 

Even this far-from-stetn measure 
was vitiated within days by the pres- 
ident’s p ermi ssi on to former Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter to visit North 
Korea. Although the trip was la- 
beled “private,” no set of measures 
more confusing to friend and adver- 


No compromise is possible 
between anudear and a 
non-nuclear North Korea. 
A rollback is needed. 

sary alike could have been imagined 
than to combine a move for sanc- 
tions with the occasion of a visit to 
North Korea by the highest-ranking 
American ever to have gone there. 

Not surprisingly, Kim 11 Sung used 
the Carter visit to induce yet another 
American retreat. The sanction ef- 


Support the Secretary of State or Replace Him 


W ASHINGTON — Bill Clinton's dispatch 
of David Gergen to the State Department 
to help Warren Christopher explain US. foreign 
policy compounds the problem it is intended lo 
solve- It is a damaging public admission that Mr. 
Christopher has failed in a key task that he 
hjmx elf identified as a top personal priority. 

Mr. Christopher told me early in the admin- 
istration that he would function as the “Ameri- 
ca, desk officer” in this State Department, giv- 
ing at least one major speech a month to an 
American audience to - marshal the public sup- 
port that President Clinton’s foreign policy 
would need. Mr. G eigen’s arrival with a man- 
date to communicate that policy to a domestic 
audience adds another layer of authority at 
State beyond Mr. Christopher’s direct control. 

Mr. Clinton has thus undermined the effec- 
tiveness of his beleaguered secretary of state by 
pubKciy displaying his lack of confidence ia 
Mr. Omstopher's abilities. 

He must deride now if he can afford to live 
with the consequences of having wounded Mr. 
Christopher so visibly. Perhaps he can. Other 
presidents have worked around a secretary of 
state without causing great barm to themselves 
or the republic. There are cases where this 
course may be easier for everyone than an 
embarrassing resignation or dismissal. 

That game plan requires two things: a per- 
suasive pretense that all is well between the 
president and his chief diplomat, and a dear 
alternative power center for diplomacy and 
fo reig n policy, usually at the White House. 

That arrangement does not exist in this 
administration. Instead, Mr. Christopher's re- 
sponsibilities and authority are being nibbled 
away, perhaps inadvertently, by Mr. Clinton 
and outers who say they are helping out a 


By Jim HoagUnd 

friend temporarily in trouble. Bui their help- 
fulness leaves Mr. Christopher exposed to 
constant speculation in Washington and 
around the world about his job security, his 
clout and his effectiveness. 

Much of the speculation is unfair and unin- 
formed. But the speculation, and the appear- 
ance of weakness that Mr. Clinton and Mr. 
Christopher have permitted to take hold, now- 
have a life of their own. They have begun to 
interfere with the conduct of foreign policy. 

That is why Mr. Clinton must now give Mr. 
Christopher the clear and convincing writ of 
authority over foreign policy that he has with- 
held thus far, or choose a new secretary. He gives 
every sign of bring unable to do the former. If so. 
events will compel him to do the latter. 

The Gergen appointment came a few days 
after another personnel change little noticed 
outside the Beltway but scrutinized along Em- 
bassy Row as a sign of Mr. Christopher's new 
vulnerability. This was the abrupt removal of 
Stephen Oxman as assistant secretary of state 
for European affairs. 

Mr. Oxman was particularly close to Mr. 
Christopher. He took on the thankless job of 
coordinating Bosnia policy in a deliberately 
low-key fashion at Mr. Omstopher’s personal 
request. His dismissal, to make way for the 
hard-char ging and ambitious Richard Hol- 
brooke to return from Bonn, was widely seen as 
a change prompted by the White House. 

Mr. Oxman was the epitome of the loyal 
soldier w ho had no agenda of his own. an image 
that Mr. Christopher applies to himself as wdL 
A lawyer, Mr. Christopher took the president 


on as his client and has been willing to argue 
whatever case the president wanted argued, no 
matter what his own views were. 

“The president has taken away Christopher’s 
most important strength — his ability to make 
derisions.” an official who has worked with Mr. 
Christopher for a long time I old me last year, 
foreshadowing the present impasse between the 
president and the secretary. 

Mr. Christopher is far more derisive and tena- 
cious than his public image under Mr. Clinton 
suggests. This is a man who met his wife on a 
blmd dale and popped the question two weeks 
later, who butted heads with Iran’s ayatollahs 
over the U.S. Embassy hostages and who has 
won the respect of world-class tough guys Yitz- 
hak Rabin of Israel and Hafez Assad of Syria. 

But Mr. Christopher has acquiesced in being 
cast as a major part of the problem, seeing this 
as part of the service he can render io a youthful 
president still feeling his way on foreign policy. 
Mr. Christopher has gone along with a situation 
where his strengths have been minimized and 
his weaknesses in articulation and strategic vi- 
sion have been pul on glaring display. 

A secretary of state who is perceived by the 
leaders with whom be must deal and his own 
national public as weak is a dangerous luxury 
when there is no other strong figure to inspire 
confidence in the administration. 

David Gergen. for all his manifest talents, 
cannot change that. Only Bill Clinton can. The 
president must convincingly show that Mr. 
Christopher has his full confidence in running 
American diplomacy — or find someone who 
does. The public battering of Warren Christo- 
pher has created a sense of doubt and confusion 
that must now be dispelled. 

The Washington Post. 


fort was suspended. In return for 
“good faith” negotiations, Pyong- 
yang agreed not to reprocess the 
plutonium it illegally removed from 
the reactor. In return, it has asked 
for America's recognition, a U.S. 
pledge not to use nuclear weapons 
on the Korean Peninsula, and an 
economic aid program in the guise 
of resources for a light water reactor. 

The essence of these proposals is. 
in effect, U.S. acquiescence in what 
Pyongyang has already accomplished 
in return for restoring partial “safe- 
guards “ under which the present 
North Korean nuclear capability was 
developed. In fact, the much touted 
Pyongyang concessions are more 
compatible with an attempt to gain 
time than with a serious effort to 
solve the nuclear problem. 

Pyongyang’s postponement of re- 
processing would mean something 
only if the forthcoming negotiations 
lasted more than three months. For 
when plutonium emerges f rom nude- 
ar reactors it is too radioactive to 
reprocess. A “coding down” period 
is needed. Pyongyang's overture may 
be designed to prevent an air strike 
against the reprocessing facilities 


during the crucial next three months, 
when there is no danger of fallout. 

In the best of circumstances, the 
North will retain the essence of its 
nuclear program and the ability to 
sell nuclear technology, plutonium 
and ballistic missiles. Apparently, it 
is able to continue budding a new. 
much larger nuclear power "plant. 

The danger extends far beyond 
Asia. A no-lose prospect is being put 
before rogue states aspiring to enter 
the nuclear club: they can extract 
blackmail for abandoning their pro- 
grams or they will be left with nucle- 
ar weapons. They have been given 
no incentive whatsoever to av oid the 
road toward nudear weapons tech- 
nology. Nonproliferation is being 
dealt a heavy blow. 

The beginning of wisdom for 
American policymakers is to recog- 
nize that no compromise is possible 
between a nuclear and a non-nucle- 
ar North Korea. A freeze of the 
North’s activities leaving it in pos- 
session of the existing weapons and 
the growing plutonium-producing 
capability would pose a mounting 
threat to vital American interests in 
Asia, to Asian stability itself, and. in 


the longer run. to America's role in 
the region and to nonproliferation 
in general. A rollback is needed. 

It is necessary for the president to 
explain these realities to the Ameri- 
can people. Acquiescing in the exist- 
ing weapons because they were pro- 
duced during the Bush years may be 
good politics but it is poor foreign 
policy. The administration may not 
wish to run the risks of denucleariz- 
ing North Korea, but Americans owe 
it to themselves not to be deluded 
about the broad consequences of ac- 
quiescing in a nudear North Korea. 

Unless the forthcoming talks with 
North Korea make rapid progress 
toward ending the North Korean 
weapons program, the United States 
should call a conference, within the 
framework of the nonproliferation 
treaty, of nuclear states and Japan, 
because of its vital interests in 
Northeast Asia. America must stress 
there its convictions and invite their 
proposals, especially as the nonpro- 
liferation treaty is coming up for 
review next year. Only after such a 
conference can il be determined 
whether the United States should 
proceed unilaterally. 


The American message in such a 
diplomacy should be unambiguous. 
While America would welcome nor- 
mal relations with Pyongyang and is 
prepared 10 help find alternative 
sources of energy for it, these mea- 
sures cannot be extorted by a nucle- 
ar weapons program. The precondi- 
tion for unproved relations must be 
full compliance with IAEA inspec- 
tions of all sites, whether declared or 
suspected, an accounting for past 
production, and a return to the non- 
proliferation treaty. Obviously, if 
North Korea begins to refuel' the 
reactor or reprocess the plutonium, 
Washington should break off the 
talks with il and immediately seek 
full sanctions against it. 

Before any mili tary action is im- 
plemented. another serious diplo- 
matic effort is necessary. But it must 
have a definite time limit; il should 
remove, not entrench, the North 
Korean weapons program. In the 
meantime, the president should pre- 
pare himself, his administration and 
the American people for the possi- 
bility that even the most dedicated 
diplomacy may not succeed. 

© Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 




Jr. - _7r, T-. 





YKWF V\ferid Wide Fund For Nature . . . 

■: (fonnetiy afartoWiMiifc Fuad) 

InKnudonaf Secretariat, 1196 Gland, Switzerland. 

Outside the industrialised west, no-on c has to be told to. 
respect their ciders. 1 It’s simply the way society is organised. 

Which is why WWF - World Wide Fund for Nature tries' 
to work with, older people in the villages of the rainforests. With 
WWFk help, they Tearo to. teach, the younger members of their 
communities about conservation.. 

In ' Kafuc Flats,' Zambia, it’s Chief Hamusonde (93), 

Chief Bakary {78). is our man in Anjavimfljavaoana, 
northern Madagascar. .. . 

In Ban Klong Sai, Thailand, we invoke the 
Wmcrablt; Papasw Bhikkhu, sevrary-three year old 
chief Budtttiist monk. 

This isn't just expediency, it's how WWF 
believes conservation projects should be run 
• Before yon teach someone, we beiieve 
you have to leant from them. 

We spend years visiting village after 
village, talking to the people, listening 
to them, living with them, understanding 
how they live their lives. 

Only then arc wp able to gain 
the confidence of the village elders. 

Once they realise we're on their 
side, our elderly converts put forward 
the argument for conservation with ‘a 
zeal that beh'es their years. 

. “Uncle" Prom (68), another of 
our Thai community leaders, tells us 
that he frequently gets scolded when he 
starts telling pco|rfe in the market that 
they should leave the forests atone. 

But he gets, results. 

Uncle Prom and his fellow vil- 
lagers reeejntly managed to prevent 
i new logging concession, and stfr up 
a community forest where tree felling 
is now forbidden. 

Ninety-three year old Chief 
Hamusonde also nwk« fhin 8 s happen. 

income from the Kafuc Flats 
game reserve in Zambia is funding a 
school, a clrnk and new water bore- 
holes for the local villages- 

In. Madagascar, sevemy-eight 

year old Chief malcS . 


a profit by selling fruit grown in their new tree nursery. 

More importantly. Chief Bakary s village now takes fewer 
trees from the rainforest because the nursery can provide fire- 
wood and poles for construction. 

Nor that wr don't believe in catching them while they’re 
young. WWF also organises 
.special training 
courses 


to help teachers incorporate conservation mtu the curriculum. 

2l'.l Ml primary teachers in Madagascar have al reads taken 
part. And WWF produce leaching aids as well as teachers. 

We commission educational Jaci sheers, booklets, posters 
and videos m over rwentv different languages. These are distri- 


buted to schools and colleges all over the world. 

If you can help our work w-irh a donation or a legacy 
please write to the membership officer at the address opposite. 

You unlv have lo look around you to see that the world 
still has an awful lot to learn about conservation. 



HE’S JUST ABOUT OLD ENOUGH 

for our teacher training programme 


Sfr-'V.tr*;.: r • - • 





Palestinian Discord on the Air 


Hard-Liners Seize Channel to Call Arafat Traitor 


By Youssef M. Ibr ahim 

Mm York Tima Strrtce 

JERICHO — Thousands of 
Palestinians were stunned Sun- 
day as they tuned in Sunday to 
the PLO's three-day-old official 
radio, “Voice of Palestine," and 
heard Yasser Arafat described 
as a “down," an “insolent ma- 
nipulator,’* a “hijacker" and a 
“traitor.” 

One of the Palestinian oppo- 
sition groups most fiercely an- 
tagonistic to the PLO peace 
treaty with Israel had managed 
to override the medium-wave 
on which the PLO station 
broadcasts. 

So, instead of “Good morn- 
ing from the Voice of Pales- 


tine,” listeners could hear hours 
of anti-peace venom by “Jeru- 
salem Broadcasting; The Arab- 
Palcstinian Broadcast, on the 
way to liberate the land.” 

The station is directed by the 
Damascus-based Popular Front 
for the Liberation of Palestine- 
General Command, led by Ah- 
mad Jebril, who is described by 
the U.S. State Department as a 
leading terrorist and who is a 
fierce opponent of Mr. Arafat 
and the peace accord. 

Using'better equipment than 
that of the PLO from the morn- 
ing until 4 P.M. Sunday, Jerusa- 
lem Broadcasting exhorted Pal- 
estinians to rebel against the 


Aden’s Water Supply 
Heavily Cut by Siege 


CanpUed bn Our Staff From DtyattAa 

ADEN, Yemen — Rockets 
fired by northern Yemeni 
forces killed 17 people on Sun- 
day in Aden, ana the Red Cross 
said it feared the port city’s half 
a million people would soon 
start dying of thirst if water 
supplies were not restored. 

Four rockets fell near a Unit- 
ed Nations budding in the cen- 
tral Khormaksar area of Aden, 
Trilling nin e people who were 
’■ rin g wells nearby, witnesses 
hospital sources said. 


with temperatures 
grees,” ai 


an 


Eight civilians, including 
four children, woe killed by an- 
other rocket that hit a bud 
in the same area, they sai 
Twenty- three people were 
wounded in the two attacks, 
and seven more were wounded 
in a blast in a northern suburb. 

Southern Yemeni authorities 
announced a cease-fire to start 
at midnight local time Sunday, 
in a statement broadcast by 
Aden television. It was the first 


of 40 de- 
fer the In- 
ternational Committee of the 
Red Cross said in Geneva. 

The city’s wells, he said, were 
providing at most around three 
liters of untreated water per 
Mason daily, wed below the 
world Health Organization 
minimnm of seven liters. 

He said Red Cross engineers 
were standing by to repair the 
mam water p rimping station, 
but that they would not move 
until they had received guaran- 
tees of safe conduct. 

The repair of the station, in 
territory under northern con- 
trol, would take weeks and 
would not immediately relieve 
Aden’s plight, he said. 

The Red Cross was negotiat- 
ing with northern Yemeni 
forces to allow water trucks to 
get through to Aden, he added. 



Palestinian liberation Organi- 
zation and reject the treaty. 

The episode was one of sever- 
al grand-scale lapses that have 
accompanied a rocky takeover 
by the PLO of day-to-day mat- 
ters in Gaza and Jericho. The 
PLO arrived before some of the 
equipment for its radio and the 
staff to operate it efficiently. 

Bui Israel, which controls the 
airwaves, has complicated the 
PLO’s task by assigning it the 
702 medium- wave band, which 
had been used for seven years 
by Jerusalem Broadcasting. In 
the early years of the Palestin- 
ian uprising, Israel tried to 
block the broadcasts but later 
abandoned the effort. 

Israel assigned the band to 
the Voice of Palestine with the 
knowledge that when the PLO 
equipment malfunctions or is 
shut down, the airwave could be 
taken over by the Syrian-spon- 
sored militant group. 

“The PLO is violating the 
most elemental principles of de- 
mocracy and fairness when it 
moves in to takeover Jerusalem 
Broadcasting’s wave,” said 
Fatfl Shourour, described in the 

ARAFAT; Rabin Assails Rightists for Trying to Disrupt Peace 

is the first, early, signal of the ° v ° 


Sihanouk 

(Were Son 

Freed After * 



PHNOM PENH — After an 
abortive coup here, King Noro- 
dom Sihan ouk sent orders from 
Beijing that- one of Ms sons , 
involved in a weekend attempt, 
to sdze power, be released from 
arrest, a senior government 


The. son, ftince Norodom 

Chakrapong, who. served as 
deputy prime minister u nder a 

previous, 

cd government, left Cambodia' 


of Ara- 


totalitarian 
fat” 

“Arafat wants to shuL down 
dissent” he said in a commen- 


tary broadcast every half hour 
as Vok 


Continued from Page 1 

speakers at the demonstration of “wild 
incitement," while Culture Minister Staula- 
mit Aloni charged that an attempt had 

i i_ u; .u. .J l i 


foice of Palestine remained 
silent much of the day. 

“What can we do?" asked the 
Voice of Palestine director, Bas- 
sim Abu Sumaya. “The Israelis 
gave us band 702. They could 
have given us another band, but 
they said it was the only avail- 
ability. We don’t want to fight 
with Jerusalem Broadcasting, 
or anyone else. We just want 
our radio. But it seems that 
fighting among us is just what 
the Israelis want to see." 


been made to “incite the public to rebel- 
lion." 

After the rally, groups of protesters ram- 
raged through Arab neighborhoods in 
East Jerusalem and the walled Old City, 
smashing shop and car windows and set- 
ting a vehicle on fire. Slones were thrown 
at the U.S. consulate in the Jewish part of 
Jerusalem, and a few of its cars were van- 
dalized. 

Particularly galling to Mr. Rabin were 
calls by his opponents to “defend” Jerusa- 
lem against a posable visit by Mr. Arafat, 
a pilgrimage approved in principle by Mr. 
Rabin. 


The prime minister said Likud, the main 
opposition party, had “brazenly and with , 
total falsification created the impression 
here and abroad that the nation is divided 
over the unity of Jerusalem under Israeli 
sovereignty." 

He added, “This is apolitical abomina- 
tion." 

Despite the loud debate between Mr. 
Rabin and his opponents, only a minority 
of Israelis have taken to the streets to 
protest Mr. Arafat’s visit. The PLO chair- 
man has been greeted with public indiffer- 
ence in Israel, much tike the reaction 

among PalnytfrrignQ outside the Gaza and 

Jericho self-rule zones. 

“It seems that both peoples have been 


editoriaL “They’re tired of slogans mid 
dreams. Now the. majority on both sides 
wants to live as good a life as it qan.” - 


on a commercial flight to Kuala 
Lumpur on Sunday mo rnin g, 
hours after about 200 . to 300 
soldiers loyal , to him were 
turned back in a march on the 
capital EEs brother. Prince 
Norodom Ranariddh, is cur- 
rently prime nrihistef. 

An atieg^.- co-c ons p ira tor. 
General San Song, a former in- 
terior minister, was put -under 
house arrest after the coup at- 
tcmp i Thc prince was released, 
a government spokesman said, 
on “instructions framthe king’s 
cabinet in Beying.”. 

gm g Shanonk is undergoing . 
cancer treatment in the Chinese 


soldiers involved in thd^;. 

coup attempt on S a turday night < ■’ 
were stopped by government 
tniiw about 25 kilometers (15 
miles) from the capital and sent' 



worn down by the protracted war between 
the Davar newspaper said in an 


them,' 


■ Arafat Tours Gaza Strip 

Relishing his new role as leader, Mr. 

Arafat took his heavily guarded ^ convoy on 
a roaring tour of the .Gaza Seri - 
to.nnve^f ajitice factray and.plaqne citing 
him as “President of' Palestine;” news 

agrarira. reported, . ^_^leadere of the uprising are un- 
fit remarks to a delegation orlsraeh , ^ General Song. 

Arabs, Mr. Arafat srid, “Ffeacrbas a lot of 

“this pearaisforati our children.” : fonncr OoanmaAgqmrnmeat 

The PLO chairman also was expected to 
visit his father’s grave intbe Gazan village 
of Khuk Ynni& . 


m place by the Vietnamese. 


BURMA: For Captive Dissident, No Hint of Liberty BOSNIA: . 


broke out on May 5. 

The main sources of water for 


IRAQ: Opposition Plot Bogs Down 


Continued from Page 1 


Aden, patched by temperatures „ , . . , , anccs to Mr. Kjcnardson last 

ofSiffiodeJeraS^rade JclSlfF winle T ^ h consider 


Despite the junta’s assur- on a review of American polity PreSSUTG OTt Serbs 
an ces to Mr. Richardson last toward Burma that will call for 


Continued from Page 1 


(104 Fahrenheit), he outside the 
city aikl have been cut off by a 
northern Yemeni advance. 

Fighting has prevented engi- 
neers from repairing damaged 
water installations at Bir Nasser 
to the northwest 

“People are not yet dying of 
thirst, but this wifi not take long 


book, “Freedom From Fear.” 

The junta has said that Daw 
Aung San Sun Kyi could go free 
if she agreed to leave the coun- 
try immediately. La her merting 
with Mr. Richardson, she said 
she would never accept the mili- 
tary’s conditions for her depar- 
ture. 


negotiations with her, diplo- 
mats say that militar y com- 
manders in Burma have only 
recently begun to debate the 
issue seriously. 

Clinton administration offi- 
cials say that after months of 
delay, the State Department 
wifi release details this summer 


a continued ban on internation- 
al development rid until the 
junta releases Daw Aung San 
Suu Kyi and takes steps toward 
democracy. 

The officials say the United 
States has all but abandoned 
hopes of imposing additional 
sanctions on Buraia through 
the United Nations. 


Continued fhm Page 1 


;t** p 






Patricia Wells, the International Herald Tribune's award-winning 
restaurant critic, revisited each of the more than 300 restaurants, bistros, 
patisseries, salons de thd and cafes, for this third edition of her popular 
guide. In her search, she discovered 100 exdthg new places thk have 
made it into this entertaining and useful book. 

The critics raved about the first eefitions: To walk the streets of Paris 
- without deadline or curfew - stalking everything wonderful to eat.. It’s 
the dream of every one of us in love with food. And Patricia Wells has 
done it~ No serious hedonist shodd go to Paris without it" 

-Gael Greene. New York Magazine. 

"...it is impossible to read it and not want to be in Paris. Now.” 

- Lois Pwan, Ihe_Ugs_An^tegJmm 
“...one of the best guides in English. And, mon Dieu, it was done by an 
American. There wBI be consternation in high places." 

- Frank PriaL The New York Times. 


the United States would 
to harass their war effort, US. 
officials said. Among the mea- 
sures would be stricter enforce- 
ment of prohibitions on the use 
of Serbian aircraft in Bosnia, an 
increase in areas protected by 
NATO air power and a widen- 
ing of targets that NATO 
bombers could strike in case 
Serbian forces enter forbidden 


areas. 



Photos: PaterTufrte^Racjha 


The Food Lover’s Guide to Paris," in a completely revised and updated 
third edition, includes Patricia Wells’ lively critical commentary, 
anecdotes, history and local lore. A great gift idea. Paperback, 408 
pages, wifri photographs throughout 

Pubfished by Workman Publishing (New York) and available by mail 
from the International Herald Tribune. 


Ptease send me copies of FOOD LOVERS GUIDE TO PARIS.TTwd Edition, 

al UX. £10.50 (U.S. $14.95) each, pkis postage per copy. Europe £230; North 
America, Africa, Mkkfle East E5: rest of worid £7.75. 


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If the Serbian insurgents sign, 
and the Muslims do not, the 
Serbs would reap some benefits. 
An intense embargo on trade 
would be lifted against Yugosla- 
via, of which Ser^aisthe largest 
and dominant republic. 

The Muslims also face, a 
threat that outside peacekeep- 
ers would be wothdrawn, endan- 
gering the delivery at humani- 
tarian aid. The United States 
and NATO could stop turning a 
blind eye to the delivery of arms 
to the Muslims, althou g h this 
threat would be delivered pri- 
vately rather than in the peace 
plan, UJS. officials said. 

If the Muslims do si g n , they 
would be assured at the com- 
mitment of Washington and its 
stale 



rm- 


cers with no real following. Too 
much money, they said, went 
into the production of leaflets 
and propaganda that had Kttie 
impact 

The Americans always held 
out this hope that somemysteri- 
ous officer would come along 
and rid the world of Saddam 
Hussein,” said a senior Iraqi 
National Congress official. 
“This hasn’t happened, and 
isn’t likely to happen.” 

Several million dollars are 
still given to Iraqi opposition 
groups by the CIA to finance 
broadcasts and other propagan- 
da efforts. 

Iraqi National Congress offi- 
cials declined to say whether 
they were included in the covert 
finan ci n g effort. 

The group set up its opera- 
tions a year ago in the northern 
“security zonei” controlled by 
Kurdish rebels and protected 
fay the United States and its 
allies, but much of its recent 
efforts have been devoted to 
separating warring Kurdish 
guerrilla factions. 

This is not our job.” said a 
senior leader of the. Iraqi Na- 
tional .Congress. “We don’t 
really like' it, but we have no 
alternative. We have 


ing those of CNN and the BBC, 
is beamed south cach evening to 


security zone. 

. . The television and radio sta- 
tions, frequency ^attacked by 
the government-run .press in 
Raghriad fa- spreading foreign, 
propaganda, are often jammed. 
Still, me dissidents insist that 
their efforts. are slowly eroding 
Me. Saddam’s authority. 

“We do not put our faith in a 
magical coup,” said .Ahmed 
ChftlaBireffe&yay the haul of 
the Iraqi National - Congress. 
“We arc trying to mobilize sup- 
port inside Iraq and spread 


year; they led an abortive 
seoesaomsl movement in the 
eastern provinces after royalists 
won: a UN-organized election. 

’ A Ministry of Information 
spokesman said that 28 weap- 
ons and 21 walkie-talkies had 
been seized in houses bekra^ng 
to General Song and Pnnce 
Chakrapong and that the plot- 
tern aimedto create “public dis- 
order” and “destroy - national 
institutions.” 

.“The armed group used 12 
iumoredjxrsaimel carriers and 
five limitary tracks,” the 
m said. AU gave up 


wring and returned to bar- 
racks, and none was arrested, 
he said. • 


A government minister said* 
at a briefing for diplomats that 
General Song had explained he 
was unhappy over the govern- 
ment’s willingness to move 
against the Khmer Rouge Corn- 
word to let people knowwe are munist gue rri l la s, 
here arid offer an alternative.” (AFP, Reuters) 


GERMANS: Modest EU Flans 


Coottaned froaPqe 1 


Wilfricd Marteny or industrial- 
ist Etienne Davignon, or look: 
for someone Britain could live 
with easily, such as Peter Suth- 
erland, the GATT directapgen- 
eral, or Anfbal Cavaco Siva, . 
the conservative Portuguese 
pnme-mnns ter. 

Whoever.it is, Bonn is arix- 

ious to have a candidate in time 

TOSted ‘ for e special summit meeting in 


Until this raring, the U.S. ad- 
ministration bad avoided en- 
dorsing a settlement or invok- 
ing punishments to compel the 
warring sides to come to an ac- 
cord, Speaking Thursday be- 
fore the Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee, Mr. 
Christopher defended the deci- 
sion to try to impose a settle- 
ment He argued that “the 
map’s been constructed with 
thenelp of the parties.” He add- 
ed that the result means a “via- 
ble, reasonable entity” for the 
Muslim-led government^ 


about a. month and a half of our Btnssels Jtdy IS. That would 
time.” '. allow the approval process to 

In a sweltering television theTmfowiug week when 

die, Sennat Has, a political' n * w Parfiament 

uw, uuta, canyon Germany is deter- 

* J to boost Parliament 


c omm entator, wmiw.. » j . . , 

script as the strains of YivaldTs a, ■ v 

“Four Seasons^ faded ^ aWity. advisory body 

His recorded commeat^r a 1 ?^ in 

would be broadcast on the EO deasion making. 


j's television channel in Mr. Kmkd said puHic sup- 
narth that night after the -poet for European integration 
evening news. ^ -depended -op mcreasmg dcnw 

The news, program, Mied' .Cfatic control over Union poli- 
with scenes pirated from vari- "caes. Bat that land of- fnsda- 
ous satdhte broadcasts, indud-' ti»ntal rrf(^m will not- occur 


before a 19 96 intergovernmen- 
tal conference intended to re- 
vamp EU institutions to work 
for a Union of 20 or more mem- 
bers. 

Similarly, most other Ger- 
man objectives are lang-terin. 

Although Bonn has long 
championed the cause of East- 
ern Europe ancT promised some 
new initiatives for a summit 
meeting in Essen in December, 
Mr. Kmkd. warned last month 
that membership wouldhave to 
wait until after the 2000 target 
date that has been ret 'by Po- 
land, Hungary and other East- 
ern countries. Those countries’ 
huge farm sectors and massive 
development needs would 
break the EU Budgcfr if they 
entered any time soon. 

' Germany also is demanding 
help -from its EU 


partners on 
the immigration front. Ths. 


XMUsum-ioa goverxir icm. T^d\T TT A Tg 

Tv a! LJLAtu Waitahd See Until G -7 

Jr. Democrat of Delaware, enu- . -5r>- • 


Lware,cnti- 

dzed Mr. Christopher far put- -Continaed front Page l 

ra^o^^seOTS^StoatS InternationaL For that to hap- 
^ neither bring peace in Bos- pea, inflatio nary oqw rtations 
manor be something you or this a®*® ~ oe uanqjencd^ by evi- 
president or thisnation wffl deace ^tiie economy^ tiow- 


he smd. The maiket is hot that 
bearidi rti the donar.” 
Untd-then, he said, official 


want to be remembered as hav- 
ing been any party to,” he said. 


Socialists Say 
They Must Sell 
OffieesinParis 


Ratters . 

PARIS — Fiance’s bat- 
tered Socialists are in such 
bad financial straits that 
they will have to sell their 
Paris headquarters and 
move somewhere cheaper. 

Henri Emmanudli, the 
Socialist leader since Mi- 
chel Rocard was removed 
after a poor performance in 
European Parliament elec- 
tions, said in a television 
interview Sunday that the 
offices would be sold to 
help revive party finances. 

The Socialist Party 
plunged to 14.4 percent of 
the vote in the 
elections. 


ing and that the Fed has fin- 
ished raising rates. 

“Once there is a turnaround 
on portfolio flows, the dollar 
will stabiEZei” he Said. “Such an 
environment may boa couple of 
months away, and' until then, 
the dollar wul drift lower, to 
-around 135 DM -and 95 yen.” 


country has taken in mo^e theixfp' 
400^000 refugees from the for- 
mer Yugoslavia, morfc than 
doub le the rest of - the Union 
combined, and wants. a “bur- 
den-sharing” agreement in. ; 
place to oope with any future 
waves _ o£ immigrants mun -the 
East, “-said; Kurt Schdter, state 
seexetaty of the Interior hfinis- 
tiy. But he^ concedes that ft wfil 
take-“qmie a number of yeare”: 
to persuade allies to tflKC up* . 
grants off Germany’s bands or 
send cash to defray Borax’s 


Richard C Koo at Nomura 
Research in Tokyo, said that 
“the dollar’s weakness has 
nothing to do with interest ride 

rfiff w iailiiilit, ” • 


Tins Is not . about dollar 
weakness; what we’re witness- 
ing is strength of the yen and 
the mark.” 


will hot have much success. 

J "iButJafea Lqjsky at Salomon 
Brothersin Niw Yodesaid »lmt 
if the Fed^fled to act quickly, costs. 
pressures an the currency and Germany also fa ces stn 
U-S. fiaanriah ■markets would resistaiice to its ambititm 
mtensify. .“The combination of tnrning EnropoL into 
aweakenmgddlar.lugherUB. alcnt <rf a toopean FBL" In- 
band yields and a dedmmg deed, EU officials say it -win be 
stock madreUjhe said, “inqjhcs I*® 1 *! wfough to agree on a ocm* 
that international investors vention for mem ber to 
consider U& fiscal and mono share information Gn intema- 
taiy policy too loose and the tional crime and drags through 
U.S. airrmt-account deficit too the Amstadam-based agency 
lar gc- by m October deadline. 

Mr. Lipsky expects the Fed ' Mr. Kohl also has scheduled 
to have raised the. ov ernigtit a first summit meetin g temreep 
0081 of money, cucrently at 4^5 Union and the Association 

Percent, to 5 pexomtby the end hf Sooth East Asian Nations in 


Jim G’Ndll al Swiss -Bank 
Crap, in London, said the dol- 
lar was under press u re from dis- 
fflnsioded investors who 'had 
loaded up on the currency an- 
ticmatfng it would ^qneoale 
and who are now giving up sach 
hope as they revalue prospects 
for the Deutsche mar k. - - - 


erf sum mer, but added that “no K arisru h e in Sqwembg ps part 
sub stan tial poEcy shifts should pf his effort to resist protcction- 
be-e^weted from cither the ^ pressures and Europe 


Bundesbank or tiie Bank erf ja- open to its rapidty srovimi, 
pan.” Asian oon^etitras. Wm 


The chances erf success for a 
big package to support the dab 
lar at this pout are not great,” 


Analysts at J.P. Morgan ex- 
pcct at least a quarter-pointrise 
m U.S. rates m. the next two 
weeks. They warn that “policy- 
makers need to recogrifte that 
coordinated 


ii Austria 

dgonce Fnaoe-Prase . 

INNSBRUCK, Austria — 


are 




Japan may be slow in coming, ifce add” 



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Page 7 \ 


v J.,, IOTEHNATIONAL 

Korea Summiu Road Trip for 180 ai«i 

■■*.__• . . ' ' -4.. _n:«gniw1 in the ThCV also 8gl®6“ , « c ■■mtov ihat he was Ol 


** , . ' ". : 

• ■ • ** \ 


By ’William Branigm 

Washington Pop Serncr 

SEOUL — The final details 
have been set for the first meet- 
ing of North and Sooth Korean 
leaders. 

After two days of talks in the 
truce village of Panmunjom on 
the border between North and 
Sooth, the two sides agreed Sat- 
urday that President Kim 
Young Sam and a 180-member 
entourage would travel by road 
on July 25 from Seoul to Pyong- 
yang.. There, Mr. Kim would 
hold two rounds of talks with 
Kim 11 Sung, 82, the self-styled 
“great leader” of the Cfommu- 
mst North, during a three-day 
visit. 


far talks.with the .agpd -dicia- 
a jmmmhI succes- 


r » . . - 

: . * ; i ■- ■ 


vuau 

But there was no mention of 
a proposed return visit by Kim 
H Sung to Seoul or of any plans 


tor s son mu w . . 

sor, Kim Jong IL- 54. 15 

charge of internal security, the 
armS farces and^aecorte*? 
North Koieaexperts and . 
tors, most day-to-day admm»- 

^Ttesummit meeting, theBrst 
since the Korean Peninsula was 
divided 49 yews ago atthe end 
of World war U, is seen as a 
potential key to resolving a fcj- 
■pwte over 
& nudear program 
tensions between thelxwmmg. 
capitalist south and the oosm. 

Stalinist north. i ■ ^ 

In . the absenceof a peace- 


f Ml mg, U 1 C twu — - - - . 

plans ter enemies. Thor border, the 

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* the life of the “average” Aran- laj 
- can woman. Her goal was to find ro 

a 47-year-old bom in 1947 ■— “! 
. “the year with the highest birth- t- 
rate in history, the apex of me cc 
- baby boomer demographic ex 
• buioe” — a woman on her sec- in 
cod mama®: with two children m 
and a full-time job. Gmwsnng « 
the United States with the hop b 
• of two statisticians, Cheever ai 
searched for a fife begun m a * 
. time when fewer than 10 percent 0 
■ of mothers had fuILtira wore. -L 
Her ideal woman would have a 
. been altered somehow by me a 
turbulent ’60s aad *70s, and n 
would now be stragglmg to bai- s 
ance the trafidonfll respooah^ .X 

. ities of wde and rather withthc ti 

; additional exigencies of a mean- c 
da Green. Bom in BroaSdvto. 

‘ New YoriE* in 1948 and raised m | 

Passaic, New Jersey, Linda rep- . 
resents the suburban American 
norm. Her mother was a . 
ing woman who had fa* 

convenience, not love; her father 
was “a fittle guy” m ^ 

little guys, ahat salesman whose 
aspirations did not estmd^ 

‘ yond the perimeters of wore and 
- 

to a decade that was beginning 

’ to i£2^tered woma^wd 

- with all the hamheafsot bw 
’ female forebears. Framed by a 


culture of intense parenting and 
upwardly mobile postwar com- 
TT Timttift*; this coddled cohort 

Vietnam spiraled, assassina t ions ■ _ 
became annual events, students 
became targets for national 
guardsmen, and the whole con- 
cept of righteous authority was 
buried in the wake of Watergate. 

r 

Green married the first boy she 
had sex with. Like her he was 

Jewish; unlike her, he was re- 

bdOioos, intellectual and out to 
change the wodd. 

With a keen sense of narra- 
tive honed in five novels, Chce- 
ver describes how Linda and 
David Sternberg slid into hip- 
piedom — wandering aimlessly 
through Europe, using her in- 
heritance to build a commune. 

AD the while, Linda supported 
them both, teaching Latin, 
Spanish and French wherever 
i her gypsy marriage took her. 

, Eventually, when the tenuous 
! relationship with David col- 

- ' lapsed, Linda moved on to a 

1 romance with a 17 -year-old, 

- eight years her junior. An hish 
c Catholic. Clmt Donahue 
e couldn’t have been more dxffer- 
c ent from David. He gave Li^a 
>. the tenderness die needed But 
n once they were married, he 

■ turned more and more consreva- 
d tive. He ridiculed her Hberabsm 
S and todsted an an old-fashioned 
a household A committed and 
it gifted teacher of languages nw, 
t Linda finds hersdf fivmg under 

- a different Mod of domestic lyr- 
ic anny. Today she hi the suburban 
id mother of two, with ^ resp °“l 

t 

he the good, brave gjri in the shad- 

a- ow ofadoannmitmaiL 

• • Of course, the diadow that 

n_ - iniks beyond the 
i story is that of toe . aomnwm 

to Susan Qieesw^so^^®' 

;o- Daughter of writer John Chee^ 
S ^te&stlaid^diep^: 
so- lars of her fanrily’s life m a prth 
K - foundly candid and snjgmg 
hex portrait of her fejh^ 

SSbre Dark” (1984); then, some 

^ ^ Sthough “A Woman’s Life,” 

“si, 

A-aWffsssSS 

£ -^assawS *■ 

£ raregrespofthe texmrecrfihe 

Amer ican woman s lot- 

Marie Arcna-Wari is « the 
stafi ofTh* Washington PcsL 


nffilamcd m the 
world, on other side of a 4- ¥ 
kilometer-vride Demflitarrad v 
Zcme, represents the last bas- t 
torfS: CddWar 
In an indication of continu- t 
tog hosriliti®> 1®* South Kore- 
an intelligence agency an- i 
policed the arrest of 23 alleged i 

North Korean agjmts who it 
said were invdhrcd m efforts to i 
infiltrate labor onions and Jo- i 
meat strikes. The National Se- 
curity Hanning Agency said the 

23 had been working through- 
out Sooth Korea as part of an 
organized ring since January 
1993 and had been receiving 
oriers from and reporting back 
to North Korea. 

The agency said the nng, un* 

. der surveillance since early this 
: year, had penetrated and mflu- 
mced muons, including one 
. rq*esenting writers of*e»- 
ant Hyundai conglomerate, n 
questioned tire aneeniy of 
- North Korea’s recent “fnendly 

a gestures” in agreeing to a sum- 

Z S meeting whifeeontminng to 

S (firect ^res” in what it de- 

£ scribed as efforts to overthrow 

“ the Seoul government- . 

“ Fot the summit meeting, the 
S two sides agreed that Kim 
Young Sam and his 100-mem- 
ber delegation, phis 80 rqiort- 

? ers, would drive to Panmunjom, 

S where they ^ ^ 

S North Kcaean vdudes for the 
£ rest of the road tup to Pyong- 

-as 


180 and TV Coverage fodiJs ‘Supercop’ 

d in the They Sd SmSyAat hewo^Hic R IfUTwd fOV ScOtO 

of a 4- Korea? advance teams wiuia aboul i ncwroundof togh-levd JJU Mi VC** " 


They also agreed that South j 
Kwean advance teams would 
visit Pyongyang twice before 
dw summit meeting to work out 

^^^owcolucommunica- 

^Sdcther 

They pledged not to play their 

TKnective national anthems or 

S nags at ti>® 

meeting, since neithcr recog- 

other as a legitimate 

sovereign state. 

SO /jtersome haggling. North 
Korea agreed toSow five tde- 

gteuSSw 

own broadcast vans, 

“Both sides wiD endeavor to 
ensure accurate and fair repon- 
jng,” the accord said. 


mi - — — - * 

Former President Jimmy 


Carter told Japanese official 
Sunday that he was optimistic 
about a new round of high-level 
talks between the United States 
and North Korea, Ager.ce 
France- Presse reported from 
Tokyo. 

Mr. Carter was quoted as 
telling Foreign Minister Vohei 
Kono that he believed the high- 
level talks in Geneva, scheduled 
for Friday, would be held in a 
“good atmosphere.” 

The Geneva meeting between 
the United States and North 
Korea was set following Mr. 

Carter’s meetings in Pyongyang 

‘ to mid-June with Kira D Sung. 

, Mr. Carter, who arrived in 

. Tokyo on Saturday for an eight- 

dav visit to Japan, briefed Mr. 
Kono on his meetings with the 
North Korean leader, officials 

y said without elaborating. 


.■ictwr FraHCt-frexse 

newdelh.— 

» h<ad o£ "■ “ unu> " s r,eld 

of — "irsfo" 

of K.P.S. GUI the p° h " ^1-k on two rarts reporters. 
Punjab, for failmg to stop the atto kon t^ospo ^ 

The reporters, ^'l^SStSy punched, thrown on 
Statesman wjispg^- ^S'fsSporters after they asked 
the floor and ^^^.^xJ^J^n^^^mbarrassed the officer 
questions on hockey that rqw - , ^ reporters out of 

Mr. Gill’s commandos Voict ^ro^toem into an 

the hotel where they had ^ airak^, pointed at 

unmarked jeep and drove the l j 5ev we re threat- 

“• m ” 

responsible. 


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a Terence Stamp, the 

reading ‘'Transmission^ oj we 

A Collection of Tato 
J^jean Klein on NcftXJmJ- 
iiy,” edited byBnma^^^ 
“It’s & conroilanon of 
question and answer 
Tm eetting a lottrf mrigjit mto. 

of time to read »whenldal 
took for authors who have some- 

Ihing,0 ?*« "argali Kemp. mV 


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Italy Designs a Bond Issue 

To Fit the Market’s Needs 

ByCariGewirtz 

P International Herald Tribune - r ' 

inthe international capital 
market win sm with a bang when Italy launches a novel 
floating-rale global bonds denominated 
Dajtsd « marks and yen. Thclawtch date is 
Nanle* Group of Seven summit in 

*g*s, taiy, m the hope that fin a n c ia l markets by then will have 


&C Italian offering, which Merrill Lynch is 
t ^ at - cou P on wD be identical on all three parts. 
offcrS^? £*?.? ‘Z? ccUsd to ** **'* die London interbank 

■££ return investors m each market wffl require for the paper to 

. Nevertheless, the commonal- 

ity of issuer, coupon and maturi- u» . < 

ty is expected to appeal to pro- *Toiessionai 

fcsional investors who want a invertimwant a 
homogeneous product to facffi- Inve8l0r8 wanl a 
tate trading in and out of cmxen- homogeneous 
aes. The yen ‘portion wiU be 
breaking new ground because product. 

floating-rate notes in that sector - 

have been either private placements or structured deals not de- 
signed to be actively traded. 

Although the exact amount to be raised in each currency has not 
been*®!, market talk is for Italy to issue SI J bflKon, 2 bfltion DM 
and 100 billion yen. 

Strong demand for floating-rate paper was demonstrated last 
week when Portugal launched a global issue of five-year not es a nd 
increased the amount from an expected 2 biffioii DM to US nriffion 
DM. The coupon is set at 6.25 basis points over LIBOR but because 
the paper was priced at a modest discotmt, investors were effective- 
ly paid a spread of 10 basis points over the ben chmar k 

Given the current uncertainty in all market sectors about future 
interest rate developments, floating-rate debt is the only way issuers 
ran raise large amounts of cash. Bankers report there is a substan- 
tial backlog of sovereign borrowers waiting to enter the market 
Biter being hdd hack by inability to sell fixed-coupon instruments. 

J. P. Morgan’s Go v ernment Bond Index shows that the world’s 
major bond markets measured in local currencies fella further 1.81 
percent in the second quarter, f ©flowing the 2JS6 percent decline of 
the first quarter. The biggest six-month tosses were scored in 
Britain, down almost 11 percent, Canada a nd Denmark. The 
smallest losses were in Germany, down 3.02 percent, and the 
United States, at 3.66 percent 

Small gains during June in Britain, Germany, Belgium and the. 
Netherlands suggest that "European bond market performance 
may be bottoming out after several months of sharp declines,” 
Morgan analysts said. 



THE TRIB 

International Herald Tribune 117 . 
World Stock Index, composed i.i» 
of 280 internationally Investabfe 115 
stocks from 25 countries, 114 
compiled by Bloomberg 

Business News. 113 
112 

Weakening Julyl, m 
daily closings. 

Jan. 1392= 100. 110 


World fndox 


mmmm 








F M T W T F 



North America] 


8 ■. a : ?•. 


F M T W T F 


Industrial Sactors/Weekend dose 
me* soul * 


Energy 10 9,98 1M37 -1-28 Ca pSM Goods 111.01 111.85 -C.75 

utilities liaas 115.61 +234 Raw Mattririe 122.07 12351 -M7 

Finance 116-66 116^1 +0.30 Consumer Goods 97.45 97-38 -*007 

Servic es 11530 113.86 +126 Wscetlaneous T2t M 12M8 *019 

The M» 

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Nestle Set 
For Move 
Into Iran 

Boemberg Bus/tot ffemr 

ZURICH — Ncstli SA, defy- 
ing Iran’s turbulent past and 
uncertain future, has an- 
nounced plans to build a $30 
millinn powdered-milk and 
baby-food factory near Tehran. 

wh3e a handful of compa- 
nies, including Coca-Cola Co. 
and Pepsiob Inc_, have made a 
tentative return to Iran, the de- 
cision by Nestis among the 
world’s largest food companies, 
could pave the way for foreign 
investment on a much larger 
scale, analysts said. 

"The Nestli investment will 
probably be the biggest in 
Iran,” said Vahe Petrossian, a 
specialist on Iran at the Middle 
East Economic Digest maga- 
zine. "It’s easier being Swiss, 
because it gives a clearly more 
neutral image than that of 
American companies.” 

. Coca-Cola and Pepsoo were 
ffrawl out of Iran in the violent 
days of the 1979 Islamic Revolu- 
tion. Both companies said they 
have restricted their return to 
granting franchises to local bot- 
tlers — a much less risky step 
than the one made by Nestifc. 

Pepsico b “ making a limited 
introduction of our product to 
test the market,” said Brad 
Shaw, a spokesman for Pepsico 
intfttTuttmnat. “It's overstating 
things to characterize this as a 
full-blown return.” 

Besides having to put aside 
trauma tic memories of 1979, 
when foreign property was ex- 
propriated, analysts say foreign 
companies are naturally reluc- 
tant to build amid a shaky legal 
»im! po l itical rlimiitg in Iran. 

Despite the obstacles, ana- 
lysts said, companies like Nes- 
tfe find it hard to ignore Iran’s 
hng^ untapped market. The 
country is tailor-made for Nes- 
tle’s baby-food division: it has 
one of the world’s highest birth 
rates, and one-third of its popu- 
lation was born after 1979. 

Iran also offers an access 
route to Central Aria, and could 
develop into an important trade 
platform in the region, add 
some. 


Beware: CBS-QVC Boffo on Wall St. 


By Floyd Norris 

Sew York Tan* Servict 

NEW YORK. — When Wall Street 
loves a proposed merger so much that it 
bids up bom stocks, watch out — trouble 
is probably ahead. When investors get 
that enthusiastic, they usually overdo it. 

The latest test for the theory comes in 
the planned union of CBS Inc^ the proud 
proprietor of rite highest-rated television 
network, with QVC Network Inc^ cable 
television's second most successful ped- 
dler of cubic zircon ia jewelry. On the 
news, which broke late last week, QVC 
stock leaped 17 percent and CBS added 
19 percent. 

The reasons for Wall Street’s enthusi- 
asm are dear. This deal could quickly 
cure a variety of problems: 

• Get rid of idle rash. CBS had about 
SI billion of cash and securities just 
sitting there, prompting fears it would do 
something foolish. Instead it will pay 
that and a lot more, to shareholders, 
who will split $2.8 bflHon, or $173 a 


share, while keeping a stake in the 
merged company. 

• Find work for Barry Diller. Mr. 
Diller, the chief executive of QVC. is 
widely viewed as an entertainment in- 
dustry genius, because of past glories at 
Paramount Pictures and as the first chief 
executive of the Fox television network. 
Bui be has not been able to prove that at 
QVC whose business is hardly exciting 
and whose glamour is summed up in its 
corporate address: Goshen Corporate 
Park, West Chester, Pennsylvania. 

• Get new management for CBS. 
LanyTisch was knows for financial bril- 
liance, largely from his management of 
Loews Coro, before he took control of 
CBS. And CBS stock has performed well 
during his regime. But he often ignored 
Wall Street wisdom and acted like a 
businessman, which makes some televi- 
sion -industry people nervous. 

• Get a cable deal for CBS. It is the 
last network to get a cable alliance, and it 
now is in league with such cable power- 
houses as Tune-Wamer, Comcast and 
Tele-Communications Ioc_ which will 


become major holders of CBS shares if 
the deal goes through. 

As il happens, Tele-Comraunicaiions 
was a participant in the last big deal that 
had wall Street falling ail over itself to 
applaud, when Bell Atlantic agreed last 
year to acquire it 

But that love affair soon faded, and by 
the time the deal fell apart both stocks 
had tumbled. TCI now trades for about 
one-third less than it did in the heady 
days after that deal was announced. 

The CBS-QVC deal was disclosed only 
days after the announcement that Mr. 
Diner had been named to the Television 
Academy Hall of Fame. 

At Fox, Mr. Difler proved that one 
could succeed in television by appealing 
to youthful fantasies of sex and violence. 
Fox saw no need for a network news 
division, but was a pioneer in bringing 
tabloid journalism to national television. 

Clearly, Mr. Diller knows what ap- 
peals to Wall Street. 


Hong Kong Criticizes Takeover Conduct 


By Kevin Murphy 

Imermakrnal Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — A government inves- 
. ligation into deals involving locally listed 
Tomson Pacific Ltd. and private compa- 
nies controlled by its directors criticized 
several businessmen’s conduct, including 
casino tycoon Stanley Ho, in breaches of 
the colon/s corporate takeover code, the 
head of the investigation said. 

The Hong Kong government report 
comes as Hong Kong tries to reverse a 
reputation for lax corporate governance 
and for corruption in its financial markets. 

A 22-month inquiry into the sale of the 
World Trade Center Group, a Hong Kong 
public company once controlled by the 
bankrupt Australian entrepreneur Alan 
Bond, alleges that a conspiracy allowed 
Tomson Pacific to gain control of the in- 
vestment group without launching a for- 
mal takeover bid. 

The investigation found that many of 
the 16 companies that purchased 313 per- 
cent of World Trade Center Group from 
Bond Coip. International in 1990, were 
closely related to Tomson Pacific, which 
itself bought a 34.5 percent stake in the 
group for 1.04 billion Hong Kong dollars 
($135 million). 


By acting in concert with the 16 compa- 
nies, real estate and investment company 
Tomson Pacific gained control without 
crossing a 33 percent ownership threshold, 
a trigger that requires a similar offer to be 
made to all shareholders in the local take- 
over code. 

“I have found that the requirement to 
place the World Trade Center Group 
placement shares with independent third 
parties, thereby avoiding the need to make 
a general offer, was flagrantly breached,” 
said John Lees, who headed the investiga- 
tion. 

Mr. Lees said that three of the compa- 
nies, which claimed to be independent of 
Tomson Pacific, were closely associated 
with Mr. Ho, who was at the time a Tom- 
son director. 

One of the companies was funded di- 
rectly by Mr. Ho’s Macao-based corporate 
flagship, Sotiedad de Turismo e Diversoes 


The three companies were also allegedly 
compensated for losses they incurred in 
the takeover. 

Mr. Ho, a high-profile investor with a 
monopoly on gambling in the neighboring 
Portuguese enclave of Macao, was also 
chairman of World Trade Center Group 
between 1990 and 1993. when the compa- 
ny made several acquisitions at above- 


market prices and allegedly paid suspi- 
ciously high commissions on deals 
involving people who had helped Tomson 
Pacific avoid a formal takeover for World 
Trade Center. 

The report did not charge Mr. Ho with 
any misconduct Mr. Lees said that Mr. Ho 
may have delegated many of the details of 
the transactions and added that a person in 
Mr. Ho’s position "would also be aware of 
the significant terms of these transactions, 
the general principles behind these and 
would have exercised considerable influ- 
ence over the transactions.” 

Mr. Ho has denied the allegations, ac- 
cording to local newspaper reports. 

The government investigauon also de- 
tailed the activities of Tomson Pacific’s 
chairman, David Tong, a Taiwanese busi- 
nessman; a director, Jackson Tang, who 
has apparently fled Hong Kong: and Da- 
vid Chiu, managing director of Far East 
Consortium International Ltd., which sold 
World Trade Center Group a half stake in 
a biscuit factory and a Chinese property 
for allegedly inflated prices. 

The report, of which only an abridged 
version was published because of pending 
legal action, has been forwarded to Hong 
Kong’s police, slock exchange, Securities 
and Futures Commission and the Indepen- 
dent Commission Against Corruption. 




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Roll Over, Stradivari: 
Now, a Carbon Violin 

By Jacques Nehex 

InunuuiOHal Herald Tribune 

DOUAI, France — Here in' the former coal-muting region 
of northern France, Pierre Laurence is at work on a carbon 
copy of the world’s finest violins. If he succeeds, he may 
eventually be able to produce a carbon orchestra. 

Since giving up his architectural business "out of boredom” 
in 1988, Mr. Laurence has worked on designing a violin that 
can replicate the soond of a Stradivarius. But instead of 
employing woods such as spruce and maple, as did the 
renowned 17th century Italian luthier, An- 
tonio Stradivari. Mr. Laurence is making 
bis with carbon fibers, intricately arranged 
with the aid of a computer. 

“I think well get there in a year or two,” 
he said, acknowledging that his year-old 
company is venturing onto sacred ground 
in the music world. “We’re progressing 
rapidly” 

The key, he said, is understanding how the imperfections of 
natural wood give each instrument its unique sound, and then 
“designing in these imperfections, in a calculated way.” 

In the mean time. Composites et Instruments Pierre Laur- 
ence — or CIPL SA — is applying the technology achieved to 
date to rofl out a line of mid-range violins, priced at around 
8,000 francs ($1,450), aimed at students. 

“When you're trying to move mountains, you don't start at 
the summit,” said Mr. Laurence. 41, who employs six people 
at a workshop cluttered with assorted instrument parts and 
strips of woven carbon fiber fabric cut to the familiar curved 
shapes erf viol®, cello and bass fronts and backs. 

The violins are made by placing the fabric in a mold, where 
it is hardened with an epoxy resin coating. The fronts, backs 
and tides are then glued together, with the bridge, fingerboard 
and other components. 

Mr. Laurence’s black and charcoal instruments, which have 
an iridescent, almost holographic appearance, are highly 
resistant to bumps and knocks and, unlike wood, do not crack 
or warp because of climatic changes. The latter feature, he 
said, makes the instrument ideal for traveling musicians — 
they can store it in the freezing baggage compartment of an 
ahtiner — and for players in tropical climates. 

To demonstrate, Mr. Laurence rapped his fist hard on an 
instrument on his desk, then held the violin over the flame of a 
Cigarette lighter. Carbon fibers, he notes, are not affected 
until subjected to temperatures over 1,500 degrees centigrade. 

The French conceit violinist, Patrice Fontanarosa, tested 
Mr. Laurence’s product and gave it high marks as a lea rn i n g 
tool: “It’s a reliable instrument with which one, without 
shame, can learn bow to play,” Mr. Fontanarosa said, adding 
t hat its “purity of sound” would allow students to perfect 
their intonation. 

C3FL*5 sales director, Jean Denis, hopes to sell 300 units 
tins year and aims for 2,000 units in 1995. He is taking charge 
of distribution in France, where 20,000 violins — new and 
used— arc bought each year, but he is looking for indepen- 
dent distributors for other countries. 

Mr. Laurence, meanwhile, behoves that carbon fibers, ar- 
ranged in just tire righ t way, can be applied to the construc- 
tion of just about any instrument from pianos and harps to 
trombones and drums: Hei’s already at work designing proto- 
types. “Hi save the carbon organ for my retirement," he said. 

“He’s crazy and brilliant, and without these kinds of 
people, this profession would never advance,” said Paul 
Baronnat, managing director of Buffet-Crampon SA, a major 
French maker of woodwind instruments. Buffet-Crampon 
has bought into Mr. Laurence’s concept, agreeing to produce, 
under license, a line of oboes and clarinets made from a 
composite of ebony sawdust, carbon fibers and retin. 

“We’re his company’s life insurance,” Mr. Baronnat said, 
adding that be expects to make all of his oboes and a portion 

See VIOLIN, Page 11 


/r J) fyt, r' 

>*/ —SbTj 


w 


? = MC l 


COFFEE = ,0? 










“Cream and sugar, Mr. E.?” 


Fraud May 
Lead to 
Jail Terms 
In China 

Bloomberg Business News 

BEUING — China is draft- 
ing laws that allow fire-year jail 
terms for securities fraud and 
better regulation of foreign in- 
vestors' shares, according to lo- 
cal papers. The aim is to boost 
confidence in the country’s 
slumping stock markets. 

National regulations for R- 
shares — those available to for- 
eign investors — should be is- 
sued before the end of the year, 
the official China Daily report- 
ed Sunday. The laws will im- 
prove the issuing and trading of 
those shares, the report said. 

Some foreign investors say 
their confidence has been hit Ity 
poor disclosure by listed com- 
panies, especially in interim re- 
ports, and also by too many 
companies diversifying into 
fields unrelated to iheir main 
businesses. 

Meanwhile, the official Chi- 
na Securities newspaper report- 
ed Saturday that a supplement 
to China’s criminal law code 
had been submitted to the gov- 
ernment listing tough jail terms 
for stock market crimes. 

China's two infant stock 
markets in Shanghai and 
Shenzhen have slumped this 
year, as many Chinese have 
turned to low-return invest- 
ments like treasury bonds and 
bank deposits, complaining 
that stock markets are too risky. 

■ Tax Network Is Planned 

China is planning to set up a 
private information network to 
crack down on tax dodgers who 
bilk the govennent by faking 
invoices, according to local 
newspapers, Age nee France- 
Presse reported from Beijing. 

The network, known as the 
Golden Tax Project, would link 
all taxation offices around the 
country, unifying the collection 
and management system for 
value-added tax, the China Dai- 
ly Business Weekly said. 


H( ; i 


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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 4, 1994 


MUTUAL FUNDS 


Close of trading Friday, Friday, July 1. 


Grp Name wuy 
FdName Los am* 


AAL Mutual: 

BontlD 13— JJ5 

CaGrp MAS -.17 
AftunBdp 10 j» -.08 
SmCoSIk 696 * .13 
UWx 942 ‘-.01 
AARRtovsfc 
BcaS&Bnxl403 — 08 
CoeGrn 3M1 -JB 
GMMn 1402 —.11 
Go*1ncnx32-55 —Ad 
HQBdn 1127 —07 
TxFBdn 17.16— .11 
AHT FWlds: 

Enwrap 13J8 + JB 
R.HI lail -.83 
FL TF X 7047 —.12 
Gwtnlno 1025 -.05 

umincpx 71.01 ■‘.lo 

AFLgCODroff.M -.03 
AHA Funds: 

Baton n 1148 + A1 
Fufl 94? —04 

Llm 10W —AS 
AIM Funds: 

AdGvn 943 — Jll 


Agrsvp 

BaiAp 

BolBT 

Chert o 

Const! p 

GaSco 

GrtflBt 

Grttip 

HYWAp 

HYWBt 

Into p 

IntEp 

UmM p 

MuBP 

Summit 

ThCTp 

TFtoi 

Ut3p 

UtflBt 

VoSuBt 

Vohip 


2171 -JB 

1502 -.10 

1503 -.10 
040 + 05 

16.fl -7? 
9.32 — A5 
10A1 -28 
1006 -.19 
948 —12 
9.48 —.12 
1/0 —06 
12J0 — A1 
9.92 —Jill 
8 09 — 03 
094 -.15 
1044 —A3 
1041 —A3 
12.13 -.11 
12.13 -.11 
2076 -32 
2033 + 02 


AMF 

AtSMtB 9 AS —01 

IntMton 942 
ItiHLiq n 1053 — .02 
MhxSec n 1040 — A6 
ARK Funds 
CopGrnx 9.72 -A4 
Grtncone 9A5 —04 
income 949 —.10 
ASM Fd rac 9.40 —08 
AVESTA: 

Bokmoed 14.76 - .07 
EqCro I7A3 -.18 
Bfflicom 17.72 -.13 
Income IS77 —07 
Acoassgr Funds: 
ln)Fxlnnxl142 —II 
AccMortgll&S —13 
ShtlntFx XI1A6 — A6 
Acorn in 1548 —.05 
AcmFd 1273 -.13 
AdsnCd P 1949 —76 
AdvCBCtP 9A5 -A4 
AduCRetP 943 — A8 
Advest Advent: 

Govt no B.96 — A7 
Gwlhnpx 15182 + 09 
HYBdP 077— A6 
mat rax 1114 —17 
MuBdNol 943 —.06 
Sod np 1082 -.18 
Aetna mMmr 
A etna lx 1031 — A7 
Bond K 949 —05 
Grtncom 1x1043 + 01 
IrtttGrt has —.02 
TaxFreex 943 —AS 
Aetna Med: 

Aetnoms 1023—37 
AslanGrn 013 —45 
Bend fix 949 — A7 
Growth 942 -.13 
Grwinco 1043 -.01 
intlGrn 1IAB — 01 
SmCoGr 9.74 -A9 
fttoer Funds: 

Growth t 1847 -40 
IncGrr 1141 -.19 
MkJCoGrtlO-97 -43 
SmCapI 19.94 -A3 
AimyaiCOR 
Alionaep 648 + 40 
Bc'xip 1115 + 44 
BerianBt 1341 -Al 
BondAp 1150—10 
Cnstvlnv 1031 —03 
CnBdBn 1150 — A9 
CnBdCp 1240— A9 
Court p 1645 -.11 
GDGvtSp 845 —12 
kp 1043 -.14 
7 A3 — A6 
7 A3 — A6 
7.82 —.07 

126 *sn 

Sfi:S 

2001 -JO 
125 -A2 
IW +06 

946— 06 
946 — A6 
944 — A6 
1024 —A3 
1779 -A3 
843 — A7 

MrtoC p — 07 

MtaTrAP 944 —01 

SSKtfp 946-01 

MMSAn 003-01 
MMSBt BA3 —01 
MCAAO 9A7 —AS 
MuCABp 9A8— 04 
MuCACp 9A8 —04 

MulLCAB 1137 —12 
MINBO 943 —04 
ICp 9.19 —08 
MuNJBp 9.13 -47 


BEA Funds: 
BWkEF 


:p 9.13 —07 
MNYA 971 —OS 
MuNYBp 9J1 —05 
MuNYCP 971 — A5 
NMuAp 943— A4 
NtlMuCp 743 —44 
NEurAp 1148—47 
NEurBn 1176—07 
tfA 

049 — A4 
PrGrThAplIAO -70 
PrGrmBpllTO +.19 
OusrAp 2173 +41 
ST Map 872 — Al 


ST Mlbt 
Tech p 
Wkflncp 
AmSauth 


872 —01 
2030-174 
147 


1179 +.01 
1047 —45 
JB ._ . 1447 - 47 

Gvtln 943 —43 
LtdMat 1017 —.02 
RegEq 1652 +44 
Anumainc 1177 
Ambassador Ffcfc 
BaincF 944 
9,” 

jiwIITS -.16 
IdxSlknx 1147 -Al 
IniBondn 977 —08 
JnflSIkn 1249 -.03 
5 mCoGf tilZ JO -.12 
Ambassador tnv: 

Bond nx 973 —09 
CoreGrn 1579 -.12 
Grwthn 11.94 -.17 
IntBand nx 977 — 08 
IntlSHcn 1248 +43 
MlTFBilnx9.17 —07 
SmCoGrnl249 -.13 
TFIrtBd niflJ2 —47 
Ambassador Rot A: 
Bond he 973 —49 
GoreGr 1579 -.12 
Grwth 11.94 -.17 
IntBOfld 977 —.08 
InttSIK 1248 - 43 
SmCoGr 1249 -.13 
TFIntBd txlO.12— 47 
Amcore Vhitooe: 
EquBv 10.13 -48 
Fxlnco 947 -.03 
IrthSTF 946 —44 
Amer AAdvM 
Bakun 12.08 -45 
Eaudyn 1345 -.13 
IrttlEcrty n 11A6 -42 
LhJTrm n 9.75 —01 
Amer Capital: 

CmsfAp 1578 + 49 
CmstBp 1579 +49 
CuBtS px 6.56 —.06 
CnrpBdA px645— 07 
EmG>Cp 2241 -78 
EGAp 2200 -79 
EmGrBP 2274 +78 
EntA p 1150 +.14 
EntQp 1149 -.13 
EaTvIncA p 5J4 -43 
EalncSI 573+43 
EalncCp 573 +43 
ExchFd 10943 +41 
FdMaAp 1203 —03 
FMhBp 1210-02 
GEqAp 1148 -02 
GlEqBpn 1179 -02 
GtGvA px 8.17 —05 


Grp Name wwy 
FdName Last Chae 


GvTTBd 

GvTICp 

Grincp 

Grlrtcp 


GtGvBpfW 021 —05 

GJMduSnpgJa -05 
GfModCnpSTS —05 
GvSCAPx 949 -.1 
GvScSpx 9.91 —10 
GvScCnc 949—11 
GvTg97p 1106 -45 
GvTIAp 877 —46 
877 —06 

877-46 
1222 

1273 +08 
HartoAp 1370 +43 
NnrtG p 1346 +42 
MrndjTTVA Ifcac —08 
HiYldBpx 676 —.07 

MuBAp 948— I! 
MunBBpx 949 —10 
FaceAp 1147 +.10 
PaceB p 10.9? +.10 
T&SYAB10J5 —46 
TE>«YB 010.75 -04 
TaxExIA all 03—04 
TxEIBD 1143—05 
TXMSA P 972 —47 
U1BA p 848 
Ameffcan Fuads: 
AmSalp 11.95 +.02 
Ama>P 1144 -.10 
AmMutl pffi.94 —18 
BondFdp 111? —10 
CaptnBlp3140 +.17 
Capwidp 1505 — 06 
CopWGr 17.13 -41 
Eupocp 20 JO —04 
Ftanvp 17J1 +49 
Govfp I1M —0B 
GwthFd p254A +78 
HITrstp 1615—16 
IrtcoFdP 1344 —01 
IrtBd p 1372 —07 
InvCoAp 1007 + 49 
LldTEBd 1602 
NwEconpM-M +.08 
NewParp 1446 —01 
SmCpWp 21.96 +.14 

ToxExat Pl 145—0+ 
TxExCA PI 574 —.06 
TxExMO P14.84 — 06 
TxExVA pi 57 1 —08 
WSIUWutpl7.ll +08 
AmGwth 978 -45 
AHeritgn 1.11 +4? 
Amer Nad Funds; 
Growth x 609 +42 
Income x 2077 —16 
Triflex x 14.92—14 
API Gr tan 1142 +.02 
Am F erl O H H: 

Band x 979 —04 
EquBv ll.ll +.10 
intBdx 10.19 —03 
InbriTxF KIOTO —04 
AmUttFd n 1945 -.11 
AmwyMut r 7.07 +0i 
AnrtvtSiTGv970— 41 
Analytic n 1179 +44 
AnchCapt 1979 —49 
Aouita Funds; 

AZTF 10.16—04 
CO TF 1Q.13 —J15 
HI TF 1109—07 
KYTF 103! — 05 
MronstTF 944 —06 
OR TF 1077 —07 
TxFUT 972 —05 
Aquinas Fuad: 

Brtance nx977 —02 
Ecrinc nx 945 —01 
FxJncnx 947 —08 
Arch Funds: 

Bed 945 +43 
EmGftfl 11.06 +.14 
GovCorp 907 —05 
G mine 1242 +.10 
MoTF 1100—07 
US Gov 10J9 —05 
Armstnon L19 +09 
AtiantaGr P1061 +42 


CAlnsA 941 —05 
CdMuniA 1074 —45 
GvtSecA 977 -12 
GroIncA x 13.06 —01 
NaMuniA 1075 —47 
BB&T FUnds: 

BalTrnx 947 —45 
GrolncT nxl045 +44 
InIGavT nxV44 —05 
NOrtTBrur94l —03 
BGovTnx 948 —43 


—13 

InhEa 1908 —46 
MuniBd 1448 
SlaFxIn pxl 556—73 
U50=xlnxl449 — 73 
BFMSADu n 972 —41 
BJBGlAp 11.11 —II 
BJBHEaAp 10.92 -43 
BNY H ui nUtt 
EalnCRX 1056 +41 
intGavT 976 —05 
NYTEn 972—44 
Babsan Group: 

Bond Ln 141 —41 
Bond 5 n 971 —03 
EtlKrp2nl&46 +49 
Entron 
Gwthn 
Inti 



Tax! 

Taxi 

UMBBtl 1075—04 
UMBHrtn 979 +47 
UMBSIn 1544 +47 
Value n 2574 +.16 
l&KniMR 


Diverse nx1174 — 08 
InttEqn 197 +01 
intFlnx 871 +41 
EUrdRaidfe 

Tine 946—02 
JIPP - *-JS 
pDevP 22.10 +72 

BTi 

—05 

InvInlEq nllld —18 
InvUtanx 979—46 
InvEqlx nx10.17 +41 
BaranAstn 2044 +78 


ShtTmBdn? 
Vllnttx 12 
BasenrnBai: 
BayFondsIn 
ST Yield ? A 

U 


STYWdn 941 -42 
Bond n 942—03 
Equity nx 1070 + 46 
Hill 2777—1.71 


Ate" 

Balanced n944 +46 
BandAn 1806 —08 
OivGrAn 949 +.14 
EqldxA n 1045 +49 
FocGrAn 972 +71 
inttBdAn 2ai» +.11 
■An 1079 +.14 
9.99—01 
19.69 — 43 
SmCalA 1070 +49 
LfSGvAn 1976 —41 
USTHSxAnl978 — 47 
Ben ham Grow: 

‘»n 945 —44 
In 1075 -44 
iTFfnn 955—05 
CaTFSn 1008 —03 
CcfTFHrt 8.96—05 
CrtTFLn 10 J2 —06 
EaGronx 1143 +43 
EurBdnx I0L49 —72 
GNMAn 10.14 — .SB 
Goldin n 1177 —72 
moGron 1631 +.12 
LTreasn 8.91 —49 
NITFltl 1D73 — 44 
NITFL n 11.14 —07 
STTreasn 975 —41 
Tari995n 9613 —43 
TartOOO n 6605 —44 
Tar2005 n 4573 —77 
TaTOlOn 3275 —74 
Tar2D15n 2354 —79 
Tar7020n 1612 —14 
TNoten 979 —03 
mill neon 949 *.13 
Beroer Group: 
loapn 1477 +.17 
101 PH 1004 + 04 
SmCOGr 276 +44 
Bernstein Fds 
GvShOunl240 —42 
ShtDurn 1240 —42 
IrtOurn 1271 —46 
CoMun 1113 -45 
DivMun n 130)5 —06 
NYMunn 1348 —45 
InttVoln 1659 —.11 
BerwynFdnl7J9— 10 
Berwyn bnc nil 74 —03 
BhirudMOGIO.12 -05 
Batmare Funds: 
Balanced 948 +43 
Eauitv 10.14 -.10 
Eoindex 1004 +0H 
Flwdlnc 972 -04 
Quon tEa 951 +.13 
STFixJne 908 
SCMuni 1054 —04 


GntName wkty 
FdName Last Chae 


Bfciodwrd Punjte ... 
AmerEnn 9.17 +.17 
EmaGrtnn7.i3 —44 
. __n477 —45 
inen AM -JG 
GCrnp 9W —m 
PrcMnp 877 —78 
ST Gin 1.74 
ST Bond n 192 —41 
B^nflow 1603 -48 
Bria&an Funds: 
BrlnsnGI 11043 +41 
BnrtSGIBl 953 
NUSEqtV ?.» 
Bmdywnn ZiH ‘74 
Bruce n 9620—1.11 

BrundgSIn 1073 —43 
Bat « Beer Gp 
Gtolnc nps<8^ —13 
GaUnvnpl57S— 44 
GovtSec npl404— 48 

SSSS^rii 

SpEaa 1709 +.13 
USOvs np 751 „ 

Burnham pxl?.45— 77 
C&SRirvn 3304 +41 
CGMFKjdS: 

AmefTF 971 
CapDevn2304 +5d 
Fxdlncn 1CL2B — W 
MUTln 2647 +49 

« AS :S 

CBIHemlaTratft 
Callncnx 11.93 —.12 

CdUSnx 10.18—12 

S&FSOOm>1O03 +02 
S&PMId 1178 +.15 
Gatvert “ 

Ariel 
AlKSAp 
GiooEa 
Incq 
MBCAI 
Munlnt 
Social P 
SOCBd 
SocEa 


il . _ 

2177 +77 
1754 + 45 
14.00 —09 
10.11 —42 
10.04 

2851 +49 
1577 

20.14 -.1? 

TxFLIdn 1007 -41 
TxFLntt 1611 —05 
TXFVT 1573 —07 
USGov 1193 —06 
OunbrUtoePds: 
CaaGrA 1441 +41 
GvinA 1202 — JM 
GwthA 1400 + 73 
MuIncA 1652 —40 
CcnGrBt 1474 
GvtnBI 1204 —05 
GwthBt 1307 + 72 
IncGrS r 1607 +06 
MutncBt 1653 —09 
CapMkldx r*065 +42 
ennpi eO n R ush mo r e: 
ErngGrn lft47 
Grwth 11.07 +.10 
QmxefUH 845 —.03 

°SS , Sv a ?S-0- 

Gvtlnc 400 
MedRs 1605 -05 
NZkrnd 1075 -.14 
NJaaan 844 +.17 
US Trend 1201 +.14 
CanEmd FamBv: 
AggGfh 900 +48 
Balanced 909 
Fund 1272 +01 
GovtOtllrg 80A —05 
CtraCO 1177 —03 
C0me«0HTE948— 03 
CHitEoGC mc943 +01 
CCnfFSInC n 9.94 -03 
CertumGp BJ9 +07 
CntryShr nx22_62 — 76 
OlCapBC 1273 *JM 
ChesGrth 1276 +79 
CHostnt 14177+104 
CrtcMBwn 14371 —79 
OlubbGrln 1509 +07 
ChubbTR X 1608 
Clipper n 4779 +72 
blmd Funds: 
CoTTEA 699 —05 
COnTEA 771 — JJ5 
FedSec 10.19 — 09 
FLTEA 771-04 
FundA 704 +.09 
GOtEoA 1174 +06 
GrwthAp 1373 +.13 
HiYkiA 601 —04 
lncomeAp6i3 — 04 
IntGrA 1002 —03 
MATxA 751 —06 
Ml TEA 676 —04 
MNTEA 694 — 05 
NatResA 1241 —11 
NY TEA 682 —04 
OhTE A 705 —04 
SmStkP 1670 +.14 
SMIncA 681 —06 
TxExAp 1301 —08 
TxInsAp 7.91 —05 
USCrA 1150 +.10 
USGvA 679 —03 
UtflAP 1174 +.15 
CATE Bt 699 —05 
CTTEBI 771 —05 
FedScfll 10.19 -49 
FLTxBI 771 —44 
FundBt 704 *49 
GOtEqB 11.91 +46 
GwthBt 1378 +.12 
KYMuBt 974—02 
HYSecBf 661 —46 
IncaTMB 613 —04 
IfltGrB 9.97 —04 
MATxBt 751 —04 
NafftosBtl279 —11 



Corns* 
Fixed n 

Grrhn 


Grp Name Wldy 

FdName Lost Cbge 


DtvGffl t 

Diwlnl 

Euror 

GW I 

GttlCWt 

Gtobutai 

FedSec! 

HOhSci 

WYMl 

MuAZI 

Intmdt 

UdMunf 

MuCAt 

MUFLt 

MUNJt 


tWTxFr 141272 —49 
ConGral 1105 +.17 
Convtt 1028—05 

1508 * 78 

2972 -46 
901 —04 
1103 -.08 
674 —42 
1009 +45 

9.95 —41 
LM —44 

970 -45 
122 —10 

1040 —05 
945 —03 
954—05 
9.99-49 
1074 —08 

1049 —08 

MuOH pa 1049 —48 
MujtPAt 1614 -49 
NYTxF 10 1170 —24 
NtiRst 1172 
PacGrr 1948 —79 
PfCMI 1075 —70 
Premier p 679 —42 
SelMuP 1102 —44 
ManapedtllLSl 
ST Bd 953 —01 
ST USD 905 —43 
Strait 1405 —14 
TaxExe 1143 —09 
USGvtt 803 —05 
Ulilni 1203 + 48 
VDlAdt 1974 +.13 
B0B —05 
17.97 —09 

971 +03 
1148 +09 

9.96 —44 
1178 +45 

9.19 -04 
877 +.15 


wwmc 

WMWdf 

TCBrtp 

TCCort 

TCmcp 

TCLatt 

Bel Grp lot 
Decllx 
Drtwri x 
DfcPI 
DtcW 
TsyRsI 


1694—09 
1774 —21 
2300 +47 
64B —07 
977 -02 


Trend p 1276 +76 
Value p 1909 + 05 
Delcapp np +06 
DecJnpx 1694—09 
DecTH PK124B —02 
Delawp 17 .17 —71 
InltEq px 1200 
DeirtVTp 600 —07 
USGavtp 7M —02 
TreasAp 977 —02 
TxUSAp 1201 —06 
TxInsAp 1695 —05 
TxbltAP 1073 — 06 
TxPaAo 876 -45 
Mme n d on alFd s : 
IntiVoln 1073 +41 
USLrg 1379 +.11 
USSml 617 +.02 
US 6-10 n 1100 +03 
Jooan n 3977 +72 
UKn 23.11—54 
Cortf n 1627 ^ _ 
DFARIESf 1008 + 03 
Fixdn 101.17 — jDI 
Gt8d 97.15 +02 
Gavin 10600—75 
IrtGv 10501 —45 
InttHBM 1109 +02 
LCapInl 1249 +.02 
PocRlm 1616—29 
USLgVOI 9.98 +.11 
USSmVtd 1173 +43 


Baton n 4698 +41 
tnenmen viju — jm 
S tock n 5200 +.11 
OomSadal 1170 +.13 


Contra 1352 +.17 
HtRtn 1506 *77 
SmCpVctfnlOJM +74 
Dreyfus: 

ABondnxll7j — 15 
Aprecnp 1477 +.10 
Ass«Alni247 +05 
Balncd 13-11 -47 
CnITxn 1643-07 
Collrtn 1304 —06 
CTIrtn 1271—06 

Dreyfus xlZJ5 +41 

EdQInd 1100 +03 
FL kit n 1X00—05 
GNMAnpx1474— 14 
GnCA 1303 —08 
GMBdp 1448 —10 
GNYp 1952 —13 
Grlncnx 1674 + 04 
GwthOpnUUM +03 
InsMun npT774 —is 
Interm n 13J3 — is* 
mterEq p 1684 —.12 
hvGN n 1457 —08 
MAIrtn 1245—06 
MA Tax n 1643 —.10 
MunBdn 1276 —08 
NJhrtn 1304 —06 
MJMunn 12.98 -47 
NwLdr 33.10 .49 
NYlTxiq) 11.10 —48 
NY Tax n 1690—09 
NYTEp 1703 —46 
Feopmdf 1642 +.13 
PaoMidml5.98 
ShlnGvn 

ItlnTp" 1277 —02 
Thdptfrn 702 + 47 
USTInt 1207 —45 


Grp Mime Wldy 
FdName lust Owe 


VATXF I 1041 —49 
WVTxFl 771 —49 
Eaten VTradKawt 
Chino P 1359 -79 
FVSSkX 1100 —41 
Growth p 70S *46 
IritSos p 616 —47 
IndMp 1617 +42 
MunBdx 905—11 
STTsyp 5638 +45 

Olfi Mifl 

TrwUnvp 676 +43 
TrodTuflp 7J5 +JB 

EdipEqn 1641 +49 
EOipeclX 1741 —08 
Emerokl Funds 
Batlrafn 742 +41 
EmEal 1008 +49 
Ealnstn 1141 ^ 
FLTxEA 1653 - __ 
FLTxEI n 1053 —07 
Modem n 943 —45 
SmCapI n 694 +.19 
USGov A 1600—06 
U5GOV1 n 1040 -45 
EmpBJd 1707 -49 
Endow 1674 +41 
BRenrin Grout 
CapApp 2903+49 
GV50CP 1144-49 
Gwttinp 746 +70 
Grincpx 1700 —.10 
HYBdP 1149 —07 
SnfKJrp 1693 —01 
SmCo 5.18 -04 
TEInep 1131 —48 
Everpreen Funds: 
Evrsmn 1401 +.17 
Found n 1250 —41 
GtoRen 1379 —09 
UdMktn 2079 +.15 
ANinCAn 1044 —03 
MunlFn 10.19 —02 
Munilisn 903 —07 
Relire n 1145 +43 
TalRtn 1708 +.09 
ValTmn 1699 +.TS 
EjkcIMxKd 378 —II 
ExInvHi p 709 —48 
FAMVCdn 1905 —47 


BfChtot 1615 +46 
Growth t 1305 —48 
HlGrBdt 1001 —05 
hGYBdt 1001 — 08 
Mansdl 1103—04 
FFBLexkm: 
CopAppxIO 05 +44 
Fxdlnx 906 —.09 
mtGvx 948 -07 
5eivaiuepM76 +04 
SmCoGrnxiO02 +71 
FFBEa 1008 +.15 
FFBNJ 1004 — 46 
FFTW Funds: 

US Short 9.93 
WWHedB 955 
WW Fxdln 904 —41 
FMB Funds 
DivECpX 1172 +47 
DivEIx 1172 +47 
IrtGCp 9.90 —04 
IMG I 9.90 —44 
MiTFp 1025 —.05 
MITFI 1075 —45 
FPA Fuads: 

Capif x 1805 —10 
Newlnc x 1000 — l 20 
Parmrtx 1308 —17 
Perea x 2170 —17 
Rrirmtn 2476 +00 
Fasdann 1700 +.12 




initsikn 

Muni n 1145 
ReEEq nxl245 
Sped n 1686 +.12 


Grolncx 1649 +42 
Growth 1673 +.14 
MunB 1371 —48 
GompanCcaXhA 
Ealytncaxl207 +47 
Fxdlnx 1008—09 

S5S? ,x ]iSZl 

InMHx 1032 —10 
MunBdx 1830 —48 
NJAAunx lli Sl —09 
Mf. 1 619 — 45 
Qwnpotbe Groace 
BdStfcA pxlLW— .10 
GwthA px 1246 +43 
InFdAp 654 —06 
NW50APX1622 +.10 
TxExAp 709 —45 
USGvA p 972 —09 
GonestoBa Funds 
Equity 1620 +71 
I non 1001 —04 

LtdMat 1076 —02 
Qxui Muturt: 

Govt x 1IUM— 11 
Grwth x 1408 +05 
Income x 909 —08 
TotREtX 1374 —19 
CG CUt MM Fds: 
EmaMM 744 +.01 


IntrFxn 

IntlEan 

IrdlFxn 

LgGrwn 

LgValn 


747 -43 
1073—02 
6M 

97 8 -09 
691 +09 
MlgBkdn 703 —04 
Muni n 7.9S —05 
SmGrwn 1690 +71 
Sin Vain 659 +07 
TTOHnn 743 -04 
Cooler n 1974 +71 
G nro ru n d s: 

BalanAmc 9.90 —07 
Eotdx x 2B0« — 02 
GffldAnx 901 —.10 
GrEqAnx 9.16 +05 
IntBdA n 903 —03 
WtGrAn 1113 +03 
VaEqBpftUI -02 
CowkiOpA 1201 +.16 
COwBlIGrA 1074 +.13 
QubbeHusan: 

AstAII p 1208 —01 
Eauitv P 1501 —01 
ORMWINI2.18 —07 
Special n 1204 +.11 
QestFuads Trust: 
Bond n 908 —.05 
SI Bd n 904 —44 
SoEan 1008 +.06 
Value nx 1078 -02 
VAMun 909 —06 
CuFdAeSn 9.94 
CuFdSTn 909 —43 
Older Trort 
ApvEqnx 902 
Ealylnco nx 959 —.86 
GaviSecn 901 —03 
DGtavesJor 
Equity 1071 +02 
Govtlnoo 901 —04 
LTGovt 90S —01 
Munilne 909 —05 
Dean WHter: 

Am Volt 2075 -.14 


576 —03 

yjzs: 

1400 -48 
_ J158 —46 
MDMunA1202 — 07 
MIMUtlA 1572—14 
MNMUHA1408 —48 
MDMuBI 1202 -47 
MuBdBt 1173 -48 
MuniBdA 1173 —.08 
NCMuA 1205—11 
NCMuB 1 1204 —11 
NYMunA1445 — 08 
NY MuB 11606 —08 
OHMuA 1207 —07 
OHMuGf 1207 —07 
PAMunA 1573 —10 
PA MuB 1 15.93 —49 
TXMuA 2007—12 
VAMuA 1647 —14 
VAAAuBI 1547 —.14 
Dreyfus Strategic 
GIGrp 3306 —ID 
Growth p 4159 —70 
income p 1122 —11 
InvA 1974 +02 
InvBt 19.14 +02 
D«wreeM«mx* 
IntGovn 
KYTF n 

KYSMfn 617 —02 
EBI Foods: 
gwityp S602 +09 
Flexp 5247 +.10 
Income d 4677 — n 
Mutftflx 3879 +.11 
ESC Sir I nA 905 —07 
Eutun V Oc >- 
Olinop 703 —17 
FLLtdp 901—04 
GovtP 900 — 05 
NoMUd P 952 —04 
NottMtxip 9.11 —46 
ErtanVMandhoK 

CAUdt 9.99-44 
China t 1109—25 
MdkJt 1616 +01 
FLUdt 1006 -05 
MALtdt 9.93 -05 
MILtdt 903 -04 
Natl Ltd t 1612 —04 
NJLMt 1000 —44 


906 —11 
702 —07 


NYlidl 
PALM! 
ALTxFI 
AZTxFI 
ART xF t 


1604 —44 
ioj® —as 

1007 —09 
1072—10 

9.97 —09 

ColMunit 907 —06 
CDTxF t 903 —08 
CTTxFf 970 —09 
Enin t 1074 + 04 
FloTjJ I 1001 —09 
GATtft 908—08 
GovtOWt 909 —05 
Hilnct 703 —07 
KYTxFt 971 —08 
LATxFI 9.90—10 
MDTxFt 9.90 —J6 
MATjtfff 1611—08 
MITxFl lOJOS —08 
MNTxFt 9.91 —07 
MSTxFI 903—4® 
MOTxFt 1612 -SB 
NJTxFI 1070 —.07 
NYTxFl 1660 —07 
AMMunt 956 -06 
NCTxFI 906 —09 
OHLIdt 902 -04 
OHTxFt 1619 —00 
DRTxFt 9.97 _jja 
PATxFl 1002 —00 
RTTxFt 903 -06 
fTGWt 871 -03 
SCTxFl 902 —06 
TNTxFt 9.B6 Zjb 
T otRtnl 856 + 09 



t-iianuu 

Eauttnc 
EQ1I n 


ArmSSpn 9.64 —02 
Arm I n 904 —02 
ExchFd nx 7079 +04 
FiDttSn 1628 —03 
FST1 Is n 874 — 02 
FGROn 21.18 +44 
FHYT n 878 —11 
FITTS n 9.90 — 02 
F1TSSP 9.90—02 
FsWlStl 1079 —m 
FsiaWSSpitm — 01 
FSTn 25.09 +J1 
FST7SSP 874 _ JO 
GnmalSn 10.77 —48 
GnmaSP 1077 —08 
FMSSp 1628 —03 
IMTI5 1643 — JM 
MldCap 1631 +.19 
MadAprn 907 +05 
MgdGIn 9.96 +43 
ModGron 9.92 *04 
Mpdlncn 9.99 +01 
MoxCop 1173 +49 
Mlnicapnl699 +45 
ShrtTerm iai5 —41 
USGavtn 958 —48 
STMT SS pl61 5 — 41 
SBFAn 1577 + 06 
~ AdvisaR 

27M +78 
EqPIncA 1572 +49 
GMResc 1659 +.16 
GovInvA p 9M —M. 
GrwOppp2572 +J1 
HIMuA p 1101 —06 
HiYIdApnllTl —.08 
lltcGtp 1405—11 
LtrfTERA P9 JO — 04 
LMTBRA 1643 —03 
LfdTEl 909 —05 
Ovsea P 1160 —.08 
ST R D 909—44 
StrotOpAp 19.71 +.13 
1 lnstBUf" 
jin 27.66 +78 

U" ^ +-0? 

LtBln 1004—03 
=ideey laviah 
AgrTFm 1176 —42 
AMurn 1475 + 43 
AMprGrnl372 +44 

CATFn 11.11 —48 

inl'“ ■' 

n^ 

T1 :fs 

1740 -73 

□esdnyll 2704 +78 

B^n’l^IiS 

DfvGlhn 11.18 +.16 
EmaGror14.92 +02 
EmrMM 1545—11 
3240 +.14 
1453 -.05 
EqktX 1608 +.14 
ErCapAp nlO01 — .U 
Europe 1845 - .18 
Exchr . 

..... ln io7i +:io 

GNMn 1619—09 
GioBd 1071 -47 
GMBatn 1173—10 
GvtSecn 907 —47 
GroCa 2679 +04 
Grolnc 2102 +.13 
FSYVJ 1147—07 
InsMun n 11.12 —48 
mtBdn 1043 —02 
InterGvtn 977 —04 
InllGrln 1774 —13 
InvGBn 7.07—43 
Jaaan nr 1444 +.13 
LotAmr 13JB +.16 
LMAthtn 97 9 —05 

MITFn 1178—46 
MNTFn 1059 —45 
MuueCon 6479 +55 
Mkttndnr 

MATFn . 

MidCaon 974 -.17 
MtueSecnlO04 — 45 
Muncpln 7.92 —45 
NYHYfl 1105 —48 
NYlnsn 11.14 —48 
NewMktn 907 —46 
NewMill 1179 +.18 
OTC 2144 +75 
OhTFn 1149—04 
Ovraean Z7.97 —.18 
Pacflasn 1493 —.17 
Puritan IS55 -01 
ReuiEstn 1172 —43 
RelGrn 1701 +.12 
ShiTBdn 194—42 
ST Whin 976 —02 
SrnaOCOp 904 +74 
SE Asia nri 253 —32 
StkSicn 1447 +72 
Stropot 19.94 +.14 
Trend n 5407 +59 
USWn 1074 -07 
Util Men 14.11 +.11 
value n 41.95 +76 
Wrktw 1134 —06 
FMeOvSelecft: 

Alrr 14.19 +00 
AmGoMr214e —32 
Autor 2278 +0B 
Biotech r 2209 +49 
BrdCStr 2071 
Broker r 1659 +.10 
Chntir 327 1 +.17 
Como r 2403 +04 
CanPrdr 1140 +.12 
CslHour 1773 +76 
DfAeror 1707 —08 
DevOxnriS59 +74 
Bectrr 1658 +09 
r 1770 +.10 

r 1172 +.12 

Enviror 1074 —06 
FmSvcr 5105 +05 
Food r 2908 -00 
Health r 6193+147 
HomeF 2601 +03 
mdEfwr 1703 +.10 
MdAtotr 2103 +42 
bwurr 1955 -.19 


Grp Name WUy , Grp Name wkfy (Grp Nome WMy 
FdName Last Om Fd Name Last Otoe- Fd Name Lust Owe 


Ldsrr 3741 +72 
MeCd r 1906—46 
NatGasr 9.B5 +45 
Paper r 17J3 —49 
PreeMfifrlLBi —76 
ReaBnkr 1452 +76 
RetoOr 2154 r2 
SaRwrr 2693 + 144 
Tecnr 3449 +76 
Telecom r 0504 +j< 
Trans r 269S +07 
UIRr 3441 +06 


in 906 — 

CAHYm 1600 —07 
CTHYnr 1009 —07 
FLMum 1643 —47 
GNMAn 950 —09 
Gavlnn 908 —06 
Hightn mxl 100 — 18 i 
tnttrtunf 974-44 
InvGfBdlf 9.65 — ©s 
LMGv 955—03 
LTGn 1640 —08 
MDMltffl 955 —04 
Munlnr 9.95—46 

MHYr 1008 —06- , 

NY HYm 10.13 —.04 | PATFp 1672 —451 
PAHYm 1075 —051 PremRTPx613 — 05 


GATFp 1105 —46 BdKncenx958 - 
GIGvtncp 60S —04 I Bortdnx 1041 -49 
GIUtK P 1104 + 471 GovIBd nx 9 79 —07 
Goidp UJ4 —79 Growth tw 908 +44 
Growth P 1479 >70 InoGrnx 908 + 06 
HYTFo 1676—441 IncoEax 1106 +45 
HlMuBd plOTd —07 MlfitrdGjr 15,19—04 
maser px 270 —42 iHomeap* 1203 +.15 
INTFp 1 103 —47 I HomsiaBd n 5.B3 —41 
MStAcfc 9J9 —42 I HOmshM 1409 —02 
(nsTF P 11.90 —07 HaracMn n 1971 +.16 
NYIntmimUB — IS HudsonCapl2J» +.17 
tnfl&p 1243 —07 1 Hwrxiwrin(H04 —46 
KYTFp 1003 — 09;HumnirG 23,93 —Of 
LATFp 1699 —46 I HypSD 849 

MDTFp 1678 —07| KyaS02 9.18 - 

MassTr 1176 —.06 (AATTGr 1577 +.19 
MldiTF p 11.71 — 07 IA1 Foods; _ . M 
MNMs 1143 —46 ! Baton anx 9.68 —41 
MOTF p 1177 -48 
NJTF 1171 -07 
NYMSP 1668—08 
NYTaxpxl 157 —11 
NCTFp 1170-07 
ofcorrf P1173 -07 
QRTF 11.12— 06 > 

PocGrwthhL79 -.15 


nr 33.14 +77 
11.12 — 07 


Shtlncn 9J2 —42 
SntGvn 900—05 
ShttnMun 978 —03 
FiduCap n 1800 + 77 
59 WaB Street 
EuroEq 2900 —45 
PacBsn 3770 —75 
SmCo 11.M +.13 
TxFSI 1612 —03 
FkTHorGvt I0J3 —07 
FtflHorMurl074 —.11 
First Amer Fds A: 
ASIAHP 1615 -.04 
Bofonp 1002 
Equity P 157B +46 
EqWxn 1631 +48 
FxdMCP 1652 - 
GovBd p 9.05 — . 
inline q 903—47 
limp 90S +43 
LMtnC 944 - 

Artasecp 9.79—03 
MunBd P 1074 —43 
RegEqp 1100 +71 
Stock D 1644 +45 
First Amer Fds C 
AstABn 1615 +44 
Balance n la/Q +41 
Eqldxn 1070 + 48 
Fxdlncn 1002 —03 
GovBd n 90S —02 
Ifflfncn 903 —02 
Intllnstn 949 +04 
LMIrtcn 944 
MtqSacn 979 —03 
MunBdl n 1073 —04 
ReuEqln 1100 +71 
SpecEqn 1577 +05 
Stuck n 1604 +06 
First Amer Muturt: 
DivrGrp 876 +05 
Ertnoop 974 +05 
Monolnc P 9.57 
FstBostG X 9.12 -08 
FstEortnr 1658 +06 
FrslFdEx 1059 +06 
FrelFdTol 901 —05 
FlHwMU 1009 —05 
Kni bnesters 
BKhiP PX 14.93 +44 
dob) p 194 +42 
GovtP 1079 —07 
Grolnc px 604 * 03 
hflphYdp 104 —45 
income p 193 —03 
InvGTOP 90S —06 
LBeBCp 
LifeHYn 

USAnp 1692 +07 
MATFp 1101 —08 
MITFp 1148-07 
NJTFp 1202 —09 
NYTxFrpl4J3 —08 
PATFp 12.17 — 1 10 
SpecBd 1100—11 
5pSTp I&76 +08 
TaxExptP 975 —06 
TrtRrtpX 11.18 —02 
Utillnco nx 104 —01 
VATFp 1203 — M 
Rrst Mut 176 +.10 
Rrrt Omaha: 

Equity n 1008 
Fxdlncn 909 —05 
SIFxlnn 903-02 
FPDvAst pxl272 — 04 
FPMuBd P 1142 —04 
Fhst Priority: 
EquayTrniai3 +05 
FxdlncTr 908 —06 
LtdMGv 970 —01 
RrstUrtan; 

BalTn 1151 +06 
Bate In 1102 +.06 
Bd&p 1101 +06 
FLMurtC 973 —.13 
FxinB P 900 —02 
FxinTn 940 —03 
HH3dTFBpl072 — 08 
KiGtfTFC 11072 — 08 
MnBdT n 902 —04 
NCMunCt 907 —10 
USGvtBD 973 —06 
USGvtCr 973 —06 
UhlilyCI *.13 -.13 
ValueBp 17.15 +.11 
Valuectn 17.15 +.11 
ValueTn 17.15 +.11 
Ftaa loyest ur s: 
EmGfhp 1075 + 42 
lnttnp 9.97 —03 
brfTrp 1249 + 01 
MMuni p 10.21 —04 
QiXtiGrp 1218 +.10 
Te((ncShPl205 +.11 
TptRTsy P 903 —05 
_Vc*HP 11.10 —01 

F AAtS?wSi —07 
AATEC D 1009 —07 
AZTE Ap 1633 —04 
CTTEAp 1007 -05 
COTEp 901 —04 
FLTEP 1626—06 
GATEAp 1612 —06 
GldRbP 1674 +47 
IrtTEp 1008—44 
ICYTEA p 1654 —46, 
KSTHP 908 —06 
LATEAp 1637 —48 
LtdTEp 1005 —44 
MITCAnllTl —07 
MO TEA Pi 639 —07 
Ml TEC P 1170 —47 
NCTEAp 7.96—46 
NMTEp 903 —05 
NYTEp 1078 —06 
".p 11.11 -46 
: p ii.ii -06 
,p 9.95—06 
1067 —07 
9.71 +05 
■ 1071 —09 


PftTFp 1175—08 
SI Gov 1612 -.03 
SntCOPGrD103 -76 
TAGov 1001 — 09 
TxAdHY 872 — 49 
TXTFB 1179 —05 
U5GOVPX 6J4 —09 
UtMesp 8J0 -.13 
VATFp 1174—08 
Pranm Mgd Th 
CoroOudOUl —47 
lnvGrodep041 —04 
RlsDivp 1477 -.13 
KnklnTempb 
GtobCur 014.08 +06 
HardCurplMO *08 
HlincCarplUZ . 
Fremont Funds: 

Bondn 9.46 
Globoln 1240 + 02! 
Growth n 1644 +.12 ■ 
lrttGrn 903 —01 1 
CA tot 1003 —05 
FUndTrush 
Agns fp 1400 —.14 
Grain tp 1506 — .15 
Gwthlp 1105—11 
incatn 973 —08 
MpdTR ipH.04 —07 
Fnndamertal Foods: 
CAMun np 7.93 —10 
NYMunnpl02 —02 
USGavn 103 —03 
GAM Funds: 

Gtobrtx 136.91—1441 
irtlx 191.12—974 
PacBasel8541— 973 
GEeBanS&Sc 
DiwL-rsfd n 1665 +03 
GtotxXH 1673 —04 
btoomen 1DJ6 —06 
5&SLngnlO08 —06 
SA5 PMn 3505 +77 
TaxEx 1173-06 
Trusts n 3271 +.18 
GE Funds: 

GkMC 1802 -06 . 
IncomeCnllj/— JMi 


Bondnu 846—29 
EmOGi* pnVL3S —51 
Gavlpax 977 —16 
GfincPX 1X03 — » 
InfFdne 1373—65 
InstBdk 946 —07 
Mldcas>nel612— 08 
ReokmnpjWJO — 5 
Resrvpnx 9.9S —02 
value ne 1675 —77 
BTEXOnofe 
Idex 17.19 +76 
TGtobA e 1*99 —07 
2Gk>bCp 1444—07 

2GrowAp 1602 +74 
2 GtowCp 16JS +74 
ZTaxEx U.15 —03 
ancPIAn 9.9S— 47 
tdex 3 1404 * 73 

2Fh InAp 845 —02 
IDS Group: 

BluCopx 6.17 
Bcncp 4.88 — 04 
CATEd 613—03 
DElp 703 —02 
Dtscuvo 1072 +75 
EquitRpx 10.44 —41 
Exhlnp 4.16 — as 
FrtSIncp 445 
GftfiBdp 506 
GtoGrp 605 —04 

BffifflR 14 * ^ 


OrpName WWy 
.FdName Lost Chat 


MlMuhtt 946—04- 
VcflEqbF 1076 +JS 

Keystone: 

CusBI tx 1473 —16 
tx —77 

0»C2l 779 +03 

OrsSlbt 22.10 +41 
CusSSt 8.92 +47 
QH54t 605—3* 
Intir 700— 02 
KPUl 2372—01 
TxETrt 1632-44 
TOxFft 701 —45 
Keystone America: 
Aulncfp 942—02- 


CAPIF 

CPUBt 

EnA 

FtxA 

FOAA 

GiOA 

GvSAx 


HrfGrA 

ImdAx 

Omega 

PUA 

StcAx 

TxFAx 

WrtdBA: 

FtxBt 

FOABt 

QOpBt 

GvSBtx 

ImdBtx 


P 403 —03 

IrorTEp 575 —05 
Inti P 1627 +43 
Mod R o 10.93 
Moss P 024 —03 
Mich D us —04 
MNTEp 5.16—03 
Muflpx 1144—12 
NYTEp 012 —02 
NfiwQB 1304 +.15 
OMOP 576 —03 
PrecMlp 743 —73 
Pragresp 607 +46 
Select P 842 —05 
Stock ox 1678—13 
Sir Agar 1X71 +73 
SrEfl tx 9.14 —02 
StrlrKt 5.98 
StrST t 78 
SITWGt 509 +41 
TEBndp 341 —02 
Uffllnco 674 —41 

ISIFwxtfc 

Murripn 1621 —04 
NaAmp 9.18 +02 

Trstp 903 —05 

IntiEqD n 1440 —45 ! IndOneGT 973 —45 
StragC 1578 + 02 ! Independence Cap: 


USEqDn 1502 +.12 
GEUSE 1500 +.12 
US EqA 1659 +.11 

Grrhmt: 

EgSocn 19.15 +05 
TRVrtln 9.90—07 
TXFrVA n 1071 —07 
GTOanbab 
Amerp 1657 +06 
EmMkl 15.19 —02 
EmMktB 15.12 —02 
Europe p 1609 —05 
EuroB 1601 —06 
GvtncA 870 —01 
GvtiKB 670 —01 
GrtncAP 5.93 —03 
GrtncS 5.93 —03 
HBCrB I69B —15 
FfilncB 1141 —09 
HilncA 1142 —09 
HtihCrp 1747—15 
Inti p 1000 +07 
InflB 1632 +06 
Japan p 1371 +79 
JcxxxiGrB 1302 + 78 
LatAmG 20 S3 +04 
LatAmGB2O04 +04 
PodtP 1699 —76 
PocifB 1249 —26 
Strut A p 1071 —04 

Strata 1071 — 44 

TeleB 1697 *72 
Telecom 1*07 +72 
Wldwp 1653 +06 
WldwB 1*00 *05 



ABC p 1610 —02 
Asset np 2203 +08 
ConvScpnll0O — 01 
Eqlncpx 11.13 -07 
GflntCPn 9.99 +.10 
GtConvn 1637 -02 
GtTelp 906 + 0B 
Growth np2l 75 +76 
SmCopG 1636 +02 
Value p 1100 +08 
Galaxy Funds: 

ErtVctf 1243 -.19 
Entncmnl2J6 +06 
HOBd 948 —09 
IrtBd 9.79 —05 
irtEqtn 1204 +48 
LarpcCo nW.39 +03 
MAMun 901 —07 
MuniBd 943 —05 
NYMun 1626—07 
5TBdn 942 —03 
SmallCant698 +74 
SriiCoBtnlUH +.15 
TEBordnlOJO —06 
USTreaS r*610 —09 
UIB51YX 9.84 +03 
Gale way Fuads: 

SwitG 1 1159 *09 1 
Erisanp 2447—71 


Opportp 1663 +09 
StotGvtp 905—02 
TRBdp 905 I 
TRGrp 11.16 +.17 
EnuResti 4JS0 
■avSerOMttfc 
COpGrt 1202 +.12 
Qualm 1342 +.16 
USGvf 905—03 


Dynmp 975 +09 
EmgrthpnllAl +.18 
Energvn 1667 —01 
Environ 600 —15 
Europen 1272 
FinSvcn 1570 +.15 
Gotdn 579 — .17 
Growth np 506 +04 
HtthScn 3149 —18 
HiYldnp 679 —08 
Indlnco npM44 —10 
mtGavn 1113 
rrrflGrn 1640 +03 
Leisure n 2692 +78 
PocBasn 1639—03 
Sedncm npfi.16 —06 
StiTrBdp 903 —03 
TxFreenolS79 — 1® 
Tech n 2149 +05 
TalRtn 1772 +07 
USGovt np 702 —06 
Uttln 945 +.14 
ValEq 1699 +.13 
InvTrGvtBr 842 -07 
tsMFdnnx 1407 —04 
JPMInsflb 
Bond n 979 .. . 

Diversifd n 9.92 +03 
EmoMkE4li76 +03 
IntlEqtV n 1005 — ,05 
ST Bend n 709 —01 
SmaUCan 971 +.11 
SelE gtyn 1667 +.U 
Jackson H rt ianat 
Growth 1667 +09 
Income x 903 —09 
TaxEx x 1611 —07 
TalRtn 1651 +05 
Janus Fun* 

Balanced nllOl +01 

Ftxlncn 9.14 —03 

ste r *- 10 

irtGvt 
Mercury 1105 +70 
Overseas n974. “ 
ShTmBdn 190 

»: Sli 

jSS&i ' 


..np 1975 
ilnpn 943 —02 
np+304 —04 
Muirfd tpnx544 — 06 
Fontaine n 1629 —12 
ForTis Foods _ 

AstAII P 13.58 +.10 
CUPAPP 2667 -78 
Cupid P 1666 +78 
Rfflicrp 2770 *07 
GfcGrttlpl3L34 +71 
GovTR p 800 —07 
Grwth p 2342 + 781 
HiYWp 874 —07 
TFMN 1615—05 
TF Nat 1646 —07 
USGvt 694 —06 
Fortress luvst: 

ArfiRrt 949 
Bandr 973 —07 
EqfncFS 11101 -03 
GlSlmx 846 —08 
Munlnct 1046 —04 
NY Muni I 9.93 
OH Forte 1687 -06 




NY TE fp 1100—06 
STSbtMB 809—01 
SpdEAp 1344 +06 
SpdEBo 1X43 +05 
SpOnsA 741 +.16 
SocOpsB 708 +.16 
StrlncA lp 706 —04 
SrtncB 706 —04 


jSSSjPr"*-^" 


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AvTeeh 1614 +79 
EnvrnAp 809 -01 
GtlnBt 677—04 
1286 
1208 
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1441 —.12 


1*8 


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Goldman Sadis Inst: 

AtSGv 941 —01 . 

GovAa 9.83 —01 1 
ShrTTF 9.B7 — 02 1 

ST Gov 9.71 —03 

GavStBnd 2002 —18 
Govett Funds: 

DvtpBd 7.93 —.12 
EmaMk 

GKMn -«> , 

IrtlEq 1201 +04 1 
PfcSlg 694 —14 1 
SmCoo 1573 *.13 
GvtEqtyiw 21.94 —10 
GnnSSMi McDmcdd: 

EsIVrtPn 2176 -.15 
Govtncp 1200—08 
OH TF p 1207 —08 
OPpValp 1777 >.15 
GHMNTE 972— .11 
. . GHNMTE 10.05 —07 . _ 

UlOr 1103 *47 Greensemg 1426 —42 KSIMunLf 11.93 
44 Wall Ea 5.91 - 02 ; GriflinGcIn 1045 + 08 I Kaufman nr 372 
ForumFhndK Gwxrtkiu Funds 1 Kemper Funds A: 

kivBnd 1009 —061 AstAlloc 10.47 -04 I AdiGavA 876 

ME Bnd 1632 -451 GBGIntl 1113 -02 ! BlueChpAtl77 +.12 

ToxSvr 1076— flS Bondn 11.7B — 03 

Founders Group: PnricAv 2703 *78 

Bdlnpx 875 + 06 Stuck n 2602 -77 

BIueOu>np671 +.18 1 TaxEx 9.18-05 

Discvp 1803 +.16: USGovt 9.70—03 

Fmtrns 2401 +09 ;HTlnsEap 1272 *49 
GavSec 9.08 — 47 I HTJVI3FI p 944 —03 
Grwth np 1172 - 75 1 Hanimcota 907 +01 
Passprtn 904 —03 Hanover Inv Fds 
Sped pn 640 -7* BtCnGrl 9.89 +04 1 

WMwGral671 -09 STGvl 900—01 

Fountain S qu a re Fd S: ) SmCoGrt 973 -70 
Balanced 9A +02; USGvl 908 —06 
GovtSec 949— 02 Harbor FundE 
MkJCOD 971 -.15! Bond x 1048 —70 
CopApp n 1573 *77 
Growth p 1209 + 76 
tnttn 2303 —10 
WlGrn 1003 —01 
SWOurnx 689-05 

Vctfuonx 1243 

_.. ... M 


GtabAp 
GkttBt 
GUnA 
OtobRx 
OITedi 
GoldAx . . .. 

GoldB rx 1445 ... 

PacBas 1443 —.17 
RgBkAx 22JB +.12 
— ... RnSkBlx 2200 +.14 

1574 -41 ,j Hancock savenne 
675 -06 Adi Ax 1108—81 
ActlBtX 1103 +42 
BTOApx 9.92—15 
BrtBprc 9.92 —13 
BcndAfB 1477—10 
BondB 1477 —10 
InvAox 14.10—11 
InvBpx 141 1 —47 
USGvA o 902 —06 
USGvBt 901 —05 
JS-VBal x 1263 —01 
KSMun 1159 —04 

►06 


QuaJBd 9M —04 
QualGr 945-05, 

FrankSn Group: 

AGE Fd px 206 —04 
AdftJSp 979 —01 f 
ARS 977 —03 1 . 

ALTFp 1176 — OAlHevenFdl 90S 
AZTF p T107 —07 1 Heartland Fds: 
Brtlnvo 2241 +.14! USGvtp 972 —06 


FLTxA 

GfclncA 

GrihA 

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InCopA 

tnttA 

MuniA 

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Rrtire3 
Retire* 
Retire5 
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CAHYBdp908 -06 
Colins p 1174 —08 
CA Intern M l 20 —03 
CotTFrox 70* —06 
COTFP 1177—06 
CTTF 1665 —07 
CvtSeCP 1203 . 

ONTCp 9.19+05, 

Equity p 60a +.10 iHeritogeFuadss 
Ertncp 1305 *.11 “ - 

FIST AR5P978 -03 


WarldBdn 971 —06 


C0PAPPP1443 +74 
, Dhrincp 979 —03 
FedHderrhl640 —04 incGrp 11.12 +03 
F «ftx 1106—11 LMGdvp 9.16 
FLTFlnp 970 —091 SmCOpSplXlB — 10 
FLTFp 1179 — 06llB 4iMM ltWwdfc 


COBfTxA 7.16 . 

DivtacnA 548 —05 
EnvSvc 1173 *08 
1002 —05 
809 -02 
1272 +71 
748 -06 
80? —04 
1077 —04 
903 —04 
1007 -04 
944 —00 
1668 *02 
1272 —01 
948 —01 
044 —42 
616 —43 
6.95 —01 
SftlCpEqA 575 +.13 
Teq»A 901 *74 
T2CTFA 1006 —05 
TatRrtA 848 +08 
USGavtA BJ9— 04 
USMtgA 6.92—43 
2151 —14 Kemser Foods B: 

901 -08 1 DivlncS 548 —05 
GrifiB 1271 +71 
HIYWB 707 —07 
Shltrtl BO6-01 
5mCwe 574 +.13 
TotRlS 807 +.08 
USMtoS 6.92 —03 
Kert Funds 
ExEatus 1203 + 08 
FxdMns 90S —49 
IdxEnln 1X58 +07 

Integra 13.44 — jm 

LtMrtlns — .04 

MedTTBn 9.95—06 


906 -01 
909—01 
7204 +06 
1070 —07 
978 +02 
1749 + 70 
975—10 
1621 +09 
1905 +73 

677 — JDS 
1X53 +JB 
105*2 — 09 
702 —12 
9J0— 10 

: 651 —19 

■W7& 

1772 +70 

975 —10 

678 —07 
fl£42 +09 

1047—09 
705—11 
908 —09 

'l£i$ 

976 —09 

878 —M 

PTXFCt 1049 —09 
StCO 704—11 

K1ARF 908 —02 
KMder Group: 
ARMGVAM46 
ARMIratA 1178—01 
ARMirtSlB1178 - 
AstAtiB 1X92 +.10 
EmMJdA 1675 —08 
EmMktB 1677 —07 
GtbEaBn 1500 —0* 

SEUS" l£74 -06 
GUFXB 1X03 — JS 
GfliFxA 1204 —05 
GvfAt 1341 —07 
InIFIA 11 06 —07 
KPEt 2X76 +.13 
MuniBdA 1684 __ 

SmCapA 973 +73 


GntName wktr 1 Grp Nome 
FdNome Lost Qw 1 


Mdy 
RINarrH Lari Owe 


Mackenzie Ivy; 
ChiraAt -973 —17 1 
CWnaS 973 —17 
IWEpA 1500 +07 
Group 14.14 +.17 
GrlnAp 9.17+02 
IntlAp 2678—22 
trtlB 2678—22 
MataStoyFunasi 
CaApt 1618 +75 
Canvl . 1278 +jte 
CrpBdtJt 775-08 
EqtSs 1306 +.11 
debit 1173—04 
Gavtlx 601 —08 
NtRsGoW 11004—03 
TxFBtx 909 —08 
ToSRtt 1406 +.14 
VOlt 1544 +.14 


Sd&in 


+78 

+76 


IrtEqtn tx 1176 +08 

— — ie 

'An 900—06 
1001— K 


'V=S 


tntfq nx 2709 +.16 
5hniGvnl772 —IS 
■imMtBnxl574— 32 
SI Bond x 1975 —37 
-G»ODptrtxl975 +.11 
Bond ax 200? —21 
-IrMEqn 3501-21 
Mwfiv Funds 

90B— 04 
1675 —08 
STFxtnc 905 —02 
TR Eq 125 +04 




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GvSCtx 

tmdCtx 


Baton n 

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1306 +03 
1A13 +.16 
9.16 —07 
lijr +02 
.. . np lass— os 
USGvn 948 -03 
Laurel brvestur 


Atoen 

CapAp 

Hasp 

into 

§^P P 

TIBdP 


1409 +.10 
2705 +77 
1272 —05 
1X15 —02 
1041 —06 
1573 +78 
1106—05 


Laurel TVusfc 
Balncd n 970 +.10 
Mm Inn 1073—04 
56P500 n 943 +08 
Stock, n 1741 +.18 
Lfizanl Group: 

EauBy 1X84 +.18 
toOBq 1248 
InttSC 1009 + 04 
SmCap 1498 +.13 
SpEq 1579 +03 
SlrOYd 900—07 
LebenNY 701 —05 
LeebPernxlOTQ —17 
LeggMaserE 
AmarLdp 970 + 08 
GbIGntP 977 +03 
Gvtlndnp 974—04 
HiYWp 1472—10 
InvGrnp 900 —08 
MdTFp 1503—07 
PATFp 1572—10 
Splnvnp 19.90 +04 
TkFrinl p 1441 —05 
TotRetnp 1112 +07 
ValTt-np 1640 +7S 
Lexinttfm Grp: 
CnvSecn 1X38 +02 
CLdr 1647—177 
GNMA nx 779— .10 
1344 —07 


GakHdn 
Glhlncn 
tohn 
a Govt n 

Stlrrv 


6.18 —.14 
1548 +07 
1000 —05 
908 — 02 
340 —06 

253 — 09 

TE Bd nx 1008 — 05 
WMEro 1201 —19 
UbtflrFonAr: 
AmLdr 1407 +.16 
COpGrA p 12JJ2 +.12 
EntncAP 1102 +03 
EqtncCt 1101 +03 
hfllncBd 1075 —11 
HOnBdC 1 1074 —12 
IrtlEq n 1643 —09 
Infflnc 1608 —89 
MnSc 1100 —05 
USGvlCpx776 — 07 
USGvSecAUl —07 
U1BW 1074 +.07 

utaFdCt 1074 +06 

Libwtv Fncnckit 
Gthbie 1647 +03 
InsMuni 1079 — 06 
TFBond 1070—05 
USGov 675 —M 
Util . 1663 +08 
LTMF IV p 976 —02 
LrnfFrmp 9.71 —02 
Umtner Poods: 
Butworfcn 772 +.11 
2572 -58 


Equity 955 +.13 
Fxdtncm 908 —07 
Mud 9.93- 
MmkrtWetaSs Fdp 
Equity 947 +07 
Rudnan !JI —01 
bilFxln 90S —03 
VAMuBd 909 —03 


>x 9.47 —07 

GWnAx 93— M 

t9.JQ +03 


Brtnx 976 —01 
Eqlncx 907 —03 
Gvtmcnx 9.19 — 0s 
IrtBd nx 973 —07 
IntTXF 903—04 
Midcapn 697 +75 
STtocnx 971 —0« 
Stock roc 907 +09 
vatEqnx 1007 +02 
Mothers n 1475 —09 


Equity ten 1X16 —22 
Income! 1077 —04 
Laureatipn90O —1 1 
MertGth 1208 +07 
MortStrn .1177 +02 
AAnruerFd pH -J12 
Meridiann 2478 +76 
Mena Lynch: 
AmerlfiA 681 —09 
AdiKAp yji —01 
AZMA KM —05 
BolA 1177 
BOS VIA. 2372 +.14 
CA1MA 978 —06 
COlMnA 11.16—07 
CBpFdA 2746 +.165 
Cbreu&p 1208 + 09 
CUHBA 779 —08 
ClnvGdA 10.95 —06 
CPlTA 1103 —05 
” ~ 1454 

1577 — 78 
1478 +04 
p 9 JO —07 
973 —15 


DevCnp 

DragA 


FLMA 

FdFTA 

GIA1A 

GtBdA 

GtCVA 

GtHdA 

GIRsA 

GiUtA 

GrtRA 

HecftbA 

tasttnp 

InttEqA 

MIMuA 


1403 +.10 
1374 —01 
9.13 —05 
1071 +0T 
1X97 +06 
1570—04 
1276 +02 
1743 +70 
X55 

972 —02 
1172 +03 
907 


MNMVA 10.19 —06 
LfltAlliA 1403 +75 
MntnsA 748 —06 
MunLtdA 947 —01 
MutoTrA 905 —04 
MNaUA 1007 —07 
1649 —07 
1101 —07 
ZUfl +.15 
1044 —07 
1X99 

1575 +02 
1X50 +09 
619—02 
548 +.18 
1875— M 
SL5B — 06 

9J1 —01 

AmerinBt 681 —09 
AZMBt 1074 —05 
BTOBt 1101 
BasVBt 2X92 +.14 
CTOMnBt 11.16 —07 
978 —06 
.12776 +05 
779 —08 
10.95 —06 
1103—05 
1578 —78 

1471 +05 

FedSecBt 972 —07 
FLMBt 9. 


NJMA 

NYMpA 

PocA 

PAMA 

PhnxA 

SPVIA 

StrDvA 

STGIAP 

TechA 

TX MA 

WtdUKA 

ATORB 



HIP 

9; ... 

»TA 1074—07 

(VtunlAp 1074 —07 
StGvIAp 404—01 
SIGvICt 404 —01 
SGvTAn 404 —01 
STTnTAn 904—02 
STMuTA np9JO— 01 
SThllNI 904 —02 
5TInlCf .904— IQ 
SQTAn 1618 —03 
SIFTAn 974 —06 
TXTTAn 9.91 —05 
Vcdwhitxl3.il V03 
VahxHApx 13.12 +01 
vroueTA 1112 +01 
VAITAn HU1 —04 
VAllAa 1641 
Nanomride FUk . 
NtBond ' 681 —07 
NdtnFd 1577 +09 
MGwIh 1062 +07 
TxFrel 975 —10 
USGvlnr 948 —07 


Grp Nam* Wdy 
FdName Last Cbge 


GrihA p 1808 +79, 
HlnAp 118 — S® 
(mGA» lA —SB 
MHInAp Iftfl? 


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Genesis .747 +04 
GuanlnnxlBTl +.15 
UdMotn 974—03 
Manhatn 1076 +.18 
MUST . 1048—03 
NYCDCn 945 +07 

UlsroBd rv ■ 1M — iM 

NewAlter 2800 +06 

ag aa m ar 

nfwaBCTin rUC 

AdfUSAp 732 —01 
BroanAp 1103 +.10 
BdlncA 11.18—07 
CATFAp 776 —04 
GopGrApTXM iJO 
GtobGAPll.16— 03 
GrOpAp 1271 
GvScAR 1082— 07 
GwthA p 941 +.16 
FHlhCAp 975 —07 
IntEqAP 1603 +06 
LKfTrmAlf45 —04 
MassTApl540 —12 
TxExAp 771 —04 
VTOiiQAP 709 +.11 
BaJanfit 1100 +.10 
CaeGrBf 1308 +70 
IntEqBt 1573 +05 
ValueB 706 +.11 

NewUSAp 1109 +.11 


Kcholri 4974 +43 
Nchlln 2543—06 
MOitocn 379 —02 
NchLdrt 1703—11 
AcMBAfindK 
BoKHhB 12M 1+70 
CbraGthA1247 +70 
C0reGrihB124B+7D 
CbreGflnstl 205+70 
EmgGrA 1L23 +72 
EtttoGrB 1T.1? +72 
EmpGrirtsICtSB +71 
incGrAx 1344 
IncGrBx 1X55 +01 
WWGrB 1473 +.16 
WWgr 1404 +.17 
Nomura nf 1611 +.11 
North Am Rmls: 
AstAAC pnl0.92 +05 
GIGrp. 1446 +.14 
GrwttiCpnl444 +.17 
GrtncCprilZTS +05 
USGvtA p 901 —04 
2402 +.18 
1618 


NetovGrn 

NetnvTrn 


Ftxinn 

GrEqn 


972 -05 
1003 +.13 


tocEqn 977 —01 
IrtTaxEx n*.9* —04 
InHFxInn 909 +03 
MGrEaniara +.13 
JrtCeEQnJflJl +.09 
SelEqrt 974 +.15 
SmCpGrn971 +08 
TxExrtn 9.91 — JM 
USGavrn 944 -03 
Norweri Funds: _ 

A.SUST 902 —03 
AtSGovA 902 — 03 
COTFA 978 —04 
GvtmcTr 693—06 
GvttncA 693-06 
inaxneTr x9.<2 —07 
IncameA 943 —JS 
TF IrtcA 902 —03 
TFlncT 9 J2 — 03 
VakiGrAxl*07— 05 
VatuGrTxlAJ* — 05 
Nure en Funds: 

CAIns 1007—04 



,M.:S 

L S^n“ T, ?£nj —0/ 
GtoBdn ?4l 
Growth n ’His +. 
GrWnn 1X38 
IntlEan 1X58 
StnCBpn 1274 +.14 

LordAbfCbumeb , 
BdDebTr 475—02 
NotTFTr 407—04 
USGovt 454 —03 

Lord Abbott: 

Affittdp 1077 +08 
BondDebo978 —02 
□evetGthp907 +.19 
Eq 1990 P 1X88 +08 
FdVohiP 1X55 +07 
GEqp 1247 +03 
Gllncp 619-03 
GovtSec p 249 -02 
TaxFrp 1072—09 
TFCTp 901 —09 
TxFrCnl p!079 —10 
TFFLP 407 —04 
TFMOp 496 —05 
TFNJP 501 „ 

TaxNYp 1670—09 
TFTXp 909 —07 
TF PA p 442 —04 
TFHIp 477—05 
TFMi 473 —05 
TFWAp 476 —04 
VakjAntpllT? +.10 


Vrtfuep 
WlTxF 
Hercules Fund: 
EuroVln 9.80—43 
LAmVal n 907 +09 
NAmGrlnn949 +.11 
PctBVid n 1076 +.171 


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(Continued From Page 16) 

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ESCORT 8 TKAV9. SBMCE 
TA&2W Ml 


BroHIYd 9.15 
Fundx 1672 +.13 
Income 622 —04 
Muni 613 —05 
OnoGr 907 +.19 
MAS Foods 
Balanced n 11.15 +04 
EmeiGrnl50O +70 
Equity n 2049 +.18 
FXtflrtln 1656-03 
Fxdlncn 1103—04 
GIFXin W.I1 — 0* 
HYSecsn 693—08 
bUEan 1413 —15 
IntlFlxtn 972—01 
Ltd0urRnl031 . 
MtgBkFt 1004 -45 
MunRd 1613—13 
PAFxtan 1072 —15 
SHEqn 1707 +.17 
setRn mao— 03 
SmCpVTnl&AS +77 
ScRn 1102—05 
Value n 1273 +.13 
MFSe 

MTTAPX 11.13 +02 
MfGAP 978 +78 
BandAD 1243—07 
EmGrAp 1671 +73 
GrOpAp 1001 +71 
GvUAp 801 —02 
GvMBAP 641 —05 
GvScA p 974 —04 
HBncAp 499 —04 
LldMAp 708 —02 
OTCAp 748 +75 
RschAp 1276 +.10 
SectAP 1X31 +.16 
SOnAP 7JO— 08 

TotRAP 1207 +03 
UWAP 491 +07 
VqIuAP 979 —01 
WoEqAP 1*00 *05 
WoGvApxll07— 71 
WoGrA 1574 -JR 
WoTolApx 1 038 — .10 
MuBdA 5057 —07 
MuHiA aB4 — 02 
MuLIA 745 —02 
MuALAP 1075 —05 
MuARAp 972 —05 
MuCAAP 579 —04 
MuFLAp 903— « 
MuGAAP 1631 —05 
MUM AAP1041 -06 
MUMDAP1044 — 05 
MuMSAP 9.15 —05 
MllNCApllTS — 85 
MuNYA p 1041 —05 
MuSCAp 7171 —07 
MliTNA p 1072 —05 
AAuVAApl145 —06 
UtiB • 649 +06 

CcoGSI 1302 *M 
BondB 1241 —07 
EmGrflt 1042 +72 
GcKfl3f 419—10 
GvM^t 
GvSft 


641 
933 —05 
499 —04 
612— <M 


• ZUBCH * SUSAN * 
bovtSeryica 
Tab 01 r 1 381 99 49 


■•••• SOW IMLY ••• 

fixnrli TrowfSflrnce. 
MQ33D 983280. 


AMSTa DAMBUnaKY&cptt 

gp&wsro ■ m 


TOKYO 1,1 B5CC W SEBWC E 
Maor eredi caret orrfyihi. 
T^yq 34364596 


VDMA*MIB5 CANNB*ZUIKH 
EUHOCONWa WT bart + T.^ 
5rwt4 CoB Wema +43-131043 »■ 


OBB4T AL ESCOtr satvia 

LONDON 

PLEASE PHOhE 071 22S3314 


Hi met 

inmBt 
MATTBX 11.10 *04 
OTCB 741 +74 
M1GB 9.90 +77 
RschB 1271 +.11 
SecTSf 1278 +.17 
MuWVAp 11.15 -05 
. MuBdB 1657 —06 
1 MuHtnB 685 -01 
I TotRBt 1207 + 03 
VotUB 933 —IQ 
WoEOBt 1570 +05 
: WcGvBx 1104 — 15 
I WQGrB . 1504 +01 
WoTotSxlOJ* ~0» 

MutllBr 653 —04 
6MM Funds 
Balnea- 903 + 07 
Slktncn 907 ‘03 
StkGnvn 1613 +.14 
StkApn 1337 +30 
MiAGJC Fund* 
AUtABx 1X90 +01 
FXflnOTl 901 — M 
Invi 1AB +37 
MlgSecs 977 —08 
MMPtGtnx 908 —02 
MMPxlni nx935 —08 
MSBFdn 1673 +.12 
1 Mackenzie Grp; 


UfllnBt 
WWIncSI 

IdMtfhtkMi Eelnw 
NKHIUHI rOAi 

AstABnf 1691 -08 
CapApp t 1003 —02 
RuxBdfn 1003 —17 
Grin 1687 —07 
MetLBeSiafesI: 
QjpApA 9.14 +31 
GcpApB 9J® +31 
OtnApC 9.1? +31 
EqsncA ia?3 +05 
EhtncC 1E92 +04 
EqlnvstAlXSZ +.18 
EqtnvCp 1X57 +.18 
GovSecA 492 —05 
HilncA 418 —05 
tfilncB 416 —86 
IrtJEqAp 10-54 +.01 
IntlEqB 1652 +01 
InltEqCp 1656 +01 
tnUFxlnf 611 +01 
M0dAst8x649 
MgdAriAxasi —01 

MBdAstCxS-51 —02 
TaxExA 776 —05 
TxExB 776 —05 
MIMuInc 1047 —05 
Midwest: 

AtliUSGvt 900—01 
GovtP 931 —06 
IrtGv p 1032 —06 
Le«lUtaA10J5 —02 
LeshTsyA 657 —0* 
OH TF 1174—08 
TFlntp 1009 —03 
Monetta 1436 +35 
MoneWMC 1231 +.11 


NTJKAD 1174 —m 
NrTXAp 10J1 — K 
Reap A p 1624 +31 
5TGvtA p 22S —02 
SmCapA 1619 +06 
USGvAp 601 —06 
+02 

Jt KL28 +08 
ATLBf 1304 + 05 
BtueGt 1433 +.18 
Carrer 1008 
CapAftt 1137 +.W 
CmTcS 651 +.11 

1973 +07" 

174 -.11 
1623 +38 
1U5 +.18 

1611 

902 +05 
809 -09 
972—88 
1006— U 
1134 — m 
1630 —08 
1700 +3T 

175—02 

&jCBtBrT614 +K 
SE • 972- —02 
um8p 844 +03 
CctfTDp TO06 —07 
USGvBt -801 —06 
AHDp 1402 +05 
COBAO 1108 +.10 
" TeCp 652 +.12 
1939 +08 
679— i: 

903 +04 
1174 —07 
1634 +78 
10.13 —O' 

. 611 

902 —OB 

NYTxDp 1431 —07 

jnflDp ions _ 

STGvtfip X2S 
SmCqpO 1614 +06 
StlDp 072 — 03 
U5GDP 800 — 06 
UHOp 843 +02 
' in-1040 +J&S 

1414 +02 
Pk 



1547 +02 
906—07 

’^-02 
1170 +.14 
T410 +.1* 


W 

IrtBd 
LATF 
ST Gv 
ValEq x 
VTOGrx .... 
Pnrkstaae tosh 
BakmcdnlOTl +.10 
Bondn 930 —03 
Equity n 1483 +34 
GvtlncC 9X1 —02 
KYEqn 1X57 +06 
iretDb 1X23 +.12 
IntGvtn 902—02 
LftBWC 908 —Ml 
MIMnC 1003 — JB 
MuBdC MSS— 03 
SmCap C 1900 +04 
RnkstonelsvA: 

1071 +JO 
931 —03 
1402 +34 
9X1 —02 
1X57 +06 
902—02 
1X16 +.r 
908—01 
1653 —03 

1972 +04 

PcmBalnx 1551 _ 

Ptmassus 3100 +35 


BdA 

BanaFd 

Equity 

Mfcq 

intGavt 

IrtOSs 

LtdMat 

SmCap 


BatRtnA 2650 +.18 
GrowthA 1401 +34 
50 1639 +33 

ZrtdnlXlB +04 

PoVWnBHwlTJl— 17 
PeachTBd 9 JO. —03 
PeadfTEq 944 +07 
Prikxm 1133 +JJ7 
PenCcpA 549 +.M 
PAMuntp 1000 — 07 


EqConpxll.lt +04 
Eqfnsnx 11.11 +04 
InFICp 900 —06 
InRIn 930—0 
MCOGri 11X977 +.1 
STRCpn 976 — D 
STFI In 976 —0 
Perm Port Fond* 
PermPtn 1604—02 
TBtn n 6502 +02 
5476 . 

1144—03 
634 +06 




FxtnT 

GrvrihT 

taEriT 

MtBBk 

OhTFT 

SIBdT 


2030—11 
2573 +73 
23-78 +07 
732 —09 

2109 —as 

1904 

MartrGkLp 708 .. 
MorirSp 1605—03 
M o nt go m ery Fd* 
EmoMki 1307 . 
GtabCom 1415 —03 
Gk*O«>nl20?— .13 
Growmn 1532 +75 
tnriEMkt>O04 —15 
trttSmCdPllOO 
ShDurGf 900 —03 
SmCapn 1535 + 42 
Mara Shot Fd* 
AswnGrA153V —29 
AriotlGB 1529—79 
GtobEqA 1171 —09 
GMtEnBnl101 —10 
Mbrora&eofeB: 
Emerged 679 
FXIncm 1006 
GMxdFX r>971 —02 
InfSmCP nl673 +.14 
MunBd 1651 -03 
MrgKuSap 1209 +02 
MorgSmtostt: 
Actdrvn 1105 —09 
AsknEq 02009 —35 
8TO 973 

EmGr 1423 +.19 
EmMkf 1672—10 
BnMMW4.lt —08 
EqGrn 1148 +.17 
FXOtnc 977—06 
GEqty 1X27 +07 
GFxlnn 1033 — 09 
tS Ytdn 1076 —09 
bTO5Cn 1420 —.13 
toBEa 1484—02 
JpnEaty 1039 +09 

VTOuef^i nll79 To 5 
SCValn j«4 +03 
AkrthtokmOBn —33 
MunMlGB 1004 +05 
MuUBrtl 17.99 +07 
MtoTO Series: 

Beacon n 3X10 *30 

Oiseowy 1155 +71 

QuaHdn 2772 +.11 

iwriesn 8078 +.11 

* < iSSd?lA37 +05 
Pxrtnd P 1617 —06 
OH Ttln BUB —05 
EmRyft oiX39 +05 
NDTxFrfrn 971 —02 
NWNL H cr thri ii r 
KYMA 4,71 —05 
tocGrA 975 +03 
MUHA 4S6 —04 
NYLhrtlftfc „ 
EAFE 1X99 +08 


mtsrss^^mvaMXDCH 

ESCOTS8MCE 

PLEASE CNilCTTON 71 3WSia 

QNDA-GBCVA ' 

EkaiSeraa 

T* 077 / 26 10 14 


Bond 738 —04 

GfEq 1379 +33 

MdxSd. 1002 —05 

todxEa- lM +.12 

MuBA. 1132 +01 

ST BO 1627 

VotEq 1XH +.11 

Ntllnd 1X17 +08 

Nation* Fond: 

AdSWAD 905 —04 
AriiRtTA n 90S — M 
Bairn tx KL2S +03 
BTOTAtW 1077 rfil . 
COGTAnxlftW +.W! 
CoGrtnp 1680 *.13 
DWtNt 9J1 —07 

. DhrlTAn 9.91 —07 

At&GvAO 971 -01 i EmGTA 1615 *34 

AmS=dP*l33 —5 ~ 113 

CAMwnpx?71 — M I ErtrtA n 77 


xl .. ... 

X1139 +07 
X 1633—07 
OH MUX 1038 —09 
SmCdGr 1602 +73 
TFBdA 9M —02 
lllCorco 934 —06 
HIGorNC ir ' 

Asset Ap T23S +05 
CATEAP1600 " 
ChpHYP 1X49—08 
DiSCFdP 3X82 +09 
EqtncAp 946 +-M 
BdncBt 943 +07 
GIBtop 17.94 +.10 
GIGrp 1450—08 
GtttEnvp 979 +.10 
GUbOAp35X4 +03 
GtoUBt 3571 +02 
Goidp 1376 
HiYkiA 1X62 —08 
HTYTdBr 1X56— 0B 
IniTEA p 1630 —17 
InlTTEp .1434 —09 
InvGrAp 1031 —06 
LTGavA P1652 —02 
MnStCA 1101 !“ 

MStndSrA20AS +78 
MSlnGrC 12038 
MtglncA 1X26—07 
NYTaxA P1X16 — .12 
NYTxBtn1X17 — 11 
Qppen 1659 +09 
PATEAP1105 —12 
SpedAp 2607 +79 
SiincAp 479 —03 
ShliicBt 479 —04 
StoSTlAp 459—01 
MrtJrAp 486 —01 
StrtnvAp 476—02 
Tcroeto 2438 +34 
Txftflt 941 —11 
TxR-Ap 941 —12 
Ttonep 1SS4 +79 
ToJRtAp 70S +07 
TotRlS hi 701 +07 
USGvl P 970 —07 
VatStAp 1422 +05 


AstAOAx 1132 —02 
CATFA 1676 —04 
JWulncA 1625 —06 
StratGrA 1100 +71 
ST Govt 5677 —04 
USGvtA 1601 —08 
VRGA 943 —02 

PHBaxEG 1172 +33 

PBHGGrn 1X80 +74 

PFAMCoFdK 
Baton 1613 +03 
CapApp 1204 +.14 
DfvLcwn 11.12 +05 
EmergMktlXOT +02 
EnriEqn 1146 +09 
Eatncn 1179 +06 
toflne 9.42—2-59 
Matron 931 —M 
Mftdxj 1X19 *70 
SmCpG 1704 +32 

® v n 'vz in 

PlMCOFundc 
TotHat n 971 —06 
null 689 — D4 
LcwDurn 9.57 — jn 
LDtl 975 -04 
ShortTn 908-01 
Frynn 9 JB —01 
GtobTO n 973 -JM 
«YW 1030 —08 
Grvrthnx 1X54 +09 

BaknooS 11.96 +05 
Balanc. 11J6 *.Q5 


_ T5JM.+03 
ip 1X92 —09 
1737 +05 
1748 +08 
>P 7.19 +04 

2614 +04 

HiYieM 035 —07 
InGrAp 926 +01 
InGrSt 976 +0T 
Inn 1244 +02 
MTORAPT272 —06 
MuiRBp 1270 —06 
StodtFd 1X06 ' 
TEBd 1077 —08 
TcXRetp .1504 +JB 
USGvB 906-05 
wtdOpp ian 


_ —02 
1-sjS 
—02 
—02 
—02 
676—03 
709—02 

=07 
— JJ2 
1X66— 12 
610—08 
1239 +09 

743 —OS 

^-_JTPK 675—04 

FBarFUids: 

ny.TO.10— 09 
. IW11A5 +02 
. 'A 11X1079 —06 
InAx 

—07 

n97B 
n 

9‘ 

_ 1X10—01 
EA nl5L14 — 01 
Fund: 

p 1588 +.10 

iar“W3R 

Growth P -1038 +06 
toCDOiep 945 
Bneep 1708 —17 
Ptonr«p2X51 +.11 
PtaMBd p 1001 -05 
IntiGr 2681 —17 
PtonrOp 1843 -+70 
PWTln«Pl907rt01 
STInc XB4 —01 
TaxFreepiiTO— 08 
USGvp .. ?J1 — *5 
WrthREllXM +01 
5per Jaflriiy: 

BTOancp 1170 +03 
EmerGr 1770 +44 
Govtn 841 —11 
Grtoc . 978 +04 

InriGy 873 —71 
toriGwAtS 947 — iBZ 
MNTE 1041 —09 
NntlTE 1032 —08 
POCEurG1501 +03 
Sectorp 1453 +75 
Value P 1831 +72 
PiprTrtD 940 —05 
PtorTjShD 947—03 
PhtofTNIX 1610—85 
PerficaFdsr 
BTOKnx 2106 +06 
BdldXX 2X94—53 
Eqjnaxx 31JO +07 
Grlncnx 2X0 +.10 
tolBdM 978 —03 
JrtdGrt_nx2876 +79 
STBondn 10.08—02 
IK .2933 +42 
_ n*7l —02 

AswiArKTO^ _ 
Fxdln n 9J9 —US 
Growth n 1X53 +77 
Win 11.92 —09 
STGovn 977 —01 
vrtwn 1135 +07 
Price nradK 


CoreEql 

CoreEqS 

Growth! 

IdxEq 

mtmSdS 

mreyts 

irtTBdl 

IrtGwtl 

IrtlEq 

totteos 


948 +07 
948 *m 
926 +.12 
1699 +.10 
9.12 —03 

d« +07 

1X90 +06 


Canada 9« -02 
Rxincot 938 — -J* 
Ctabale 1140 -3 
uawuwKlBJ — 0> 
NY«mmpx9^ —to 
NrtMgpx 940 —.09 
N Amer px 440 —.08 


EatnTA 1179 —04 
EtotfTAx 943 +02 
FMMM 1007 —SS 
GAITAn 1029 —M 
GvfTAn 668—07 
GvttN ! 944 —07 

InMuTAn 948 —08 


M onogedt 9.93—05 
MancpedS 9.93 —05 
PATFp 9.90 —07 

srm . 946—02 

5mCaptnri9.17 _ 
SmCqpVSTX98 +78 
SmCopVl 1X00 +78 
VOtoei 1139 +07 

Values 1IJS‘ +07 
PRA RflYia.931 18 
POdttOTS X 803 —09 
PaCMcGrthx948 +.11 
PadHcHarina; 
AoGrp 2X52 +3S 
WTFP 708-06 
QtotocoxTX9S — 12 

a wujmCii nm 

AFrasot 1005 —01 
Bokmcex 1136 —87 
CA TF 1047 —07 
Envoi X 1X03 *08 
Gavtacp 941 —02 
ST CA n 90S +03 
Paine Webber: 

AsriAp 1073 * 08 
ATLAp 1471 +06 
Blurtlp 1842 +.18 
CTOTAP 1047 —06 
CnnAAp 1105 +.11 
CnVTCA 836 +.12 
DvGrAp »J1 *09 
EurGrAp 690—11 

QEnAt 1133 +.18. 
GlInAp 1615—01' 
GIGlAp 1604 +05 


r — . _ K11J5 —07 
age 1691 +08 
COmtn 90S —ns 
' CopAarn 1X63 +05 
DivGronxllja —06 
Bqtocnx 14.13 —07 
Eqldxnx 1X86 +04 
Buropeo 1146 —05 
FS=n 1X58 +01 
FLWInlniaoT —04 
GNMn 906 —07 
GATFji 973—06 
GtbGv 946 —02 
Growth n 1973 +.18 
Gwjhbi nxlS04 — 07 
MTYWn 8J8— 10 
tocomen 849 —04 
IrtBdn 974 
-WOsn 1691 —05 
WSfllB 1109-01 
JOpann 1X17 +74 
LqtAmn. 832 +73 
AMShtir 503—01 
MdTxFTn 909 —06 
MtoCapn UJ6 +.12 
NwAro 02548 +37 
NArian 805 —24 
Nn£ran2650 +05 
NwHnnnMia +.1B 
NJTF n 1653—07 
NYT xPn 1629 —M3. 
pTC n 1474 + 08 
SdTdin 17.17 *48 
STgdn 803— SI 
STrabn 451. - _ 

ancyi 1440 +09 

SPttpr JUS +05 
Snean 1040 — 0+ 
TxPrtwn 9.11 —05 
T*Ff+tYn1143 —06 
TFkWn 1077—03 
TxFrSln 638—01 
ilSW 509'— JR 

USLonq 948 —08 
T/A-TF n 160—06 
1077 —04 

72 +08 
9.19 -05 
947 —06 
*02 

TEPrt 870 —05 
PriFMBS 431 — B9- 
Ftwof Hindt 
BK3»x 1 147 —02 
SMk 1043—12 
CepAe exwjo-. 84 
gnjOr 2373 +38 
Govt K 1046 —15 
grwrihk 29JR —IS 
Morpied 8270 ^-02 

re Bdx irjri —12 

Utilities, x 9,19—01 
ProyrsV! +S 

WHrtMgt^^=» 

BWriSr^lSff +.18 

,ga xis :si 

SSSffaSS:*-" 

iuT.jo 

1136 +31 




None Lari Chae 


Art At . 900.+^ 
HjOd t&t 93}.— » 
,p. 1008—04 

' +-S 

1X45 2u 

• ia36 +.W 

■P * TXtf +.10 
I* . 102—01. 
t 1335 +08 
i ft] 647— 07 
VP 1172 +08 



fp 8.14—07 
,4p 1145 +.18 
1301 +77 
1009 —83 
1645 +09 
8J7 -06 
808 +09 

11.19— 03 

Eqolftrt 1349 +.71 
- 70 1343 —02 

rA! 

jim 1074 +05 

GNMA«n1302— 12 
GtoUBt 1335 +.10 
GKttSf -1335 +08 
3Ssennil779 +.10 
GtoRsm 1X00 —01 
GvPfBlfn &5f —07 
GvtScfpo 941 — 04 
GrthBt 1295 +01 
Gtopat 1134 +0+ 

R3US tn 

Mdffl'. 1295 +31 
PocGrB ■ 1642 +07 
STGtbe ■ 871 -M. 
MunArtT 1146—87 
MuPLA 902 — 06 
MuGoT TUB —07 
MBnHYt 1049 —08 
MuttSA - 1046—06, 
Muntot 1666-— a-\ 

MuMdt 1657 
MunMA t 7773 
MIAMI .1149 ... 

MunMlt 1145-05 
MuniMod 11646— 04 
MuNCt 1033—07 
MorMJt WJO — 05 
MuNYt 1141. — JM 
Mundht 1141 —06 
MuPof 1631 
NIMont 1894 ... 

Struct tp TITS —03 
StruclBf 7174 — 

USGvl ho 943 .. 

UtflBfl 878 +09 


O^IttnW 


VM9. 

Nome Lori Chge 


—05 



STBdTrn 977— g 
ShTTrTrn 9JR — *fll 
“ T roc 1642 +OT 
1 ml04l +08 



.n.1131 —25 

.....ff’SS *« 

Incomnx 1691 —.10 
Murtcn IJW— « 

n«+70 
+i S 

+33 


ran ha 

ScaornnSri 

SronnoaBr 
■Crt>n ■ 
Invesn 



1071 +JM 

BTOn 1004 +01 
Glhstkrt 11.17 +70 
tocomefn 1 A/ ... 
InltStkn 7402 —10 
Slkldxn 1001 +09 


ArtAp '1619 
AmGvAp 879 —05 
AsIaAp 1432 +04 
AABalAp 610 +J02 
AACnAp 613—01 
AAGttlAp 607 +JM 
BtGvAp - 447 —02 
AZTE 877—08 
CATxAp 613 —m 
Convert p lt*J +07 
CpAT 4138 —17 
DivGrp 944 +04 
DvrinAp 1103—07 
EnRiAp 1301 u 
EqtoAp 644 +04 
EuGrAp 1137- _ 

FMhtp 9.47—03 
FLTXA 677 —05 
GeaAp-; 1374 +07 
GtGvAp 1342 —0’ 
GIGcAp 932 +03 
GrtnAp 1112 +08 
HtthAp 2578 +09 
HtYdAp 1X81—11 
HYAdAp 979—10 
trxmAp £66 
InvAp 747 +.10 
MrrfnAp 658 . 

MaTxJl 697— OS 

MTTMIp 682 —05 
MunlAP BL68—03 
MnTXllp 672— oe 
NJTxAp 875 .: 
NwOpAp Z196 r+37 
NYTxAp 849 — JM. 
NYQpA p 658 —00 
OTCEp 908 +70 
OhTldlp 671—05 
PATE 804 
TxEXAp ' 844 . . 
TFlnAp 1449 —09 
TFHYA 74.10 — 05 
TFHYBI 1C10 —05 
TFloBt 1453— 09 
USGvAp 1246 I. 
USA P 685 +08 
VrinAp 60S +09 
VcwAp 1690 +.18 
Afflt 1617 —01 
AstaBt 1824 +04 
AABrBt 60S +03 
AAOnBt 611—01 
AAGThB f 605 +04 
BIGvBf 447—02 
612 —05 



QaeriFarl 
CATE 
Fund 

Gr^Ax 

fs*- 

NYTE 
OPport 

SmCap 1657 
USGov .1008— 08 
RBSGvtp 945 — 04 
RCM Rmd • 1938 —01 
RSI Trait 




1102 +05 
1278 +.72 
1072 +JM 
9.50 —04 
FMAspc 1619 +08 
ICMSC 1503 +.12 
MOOniEq n906+ .13 
SAMI Pfd n947 —05 
SrSpEq n 1504 +.17 
SrGwthn 934 +09 
SrSTRn 1009 
SirSrtn 932 +03 
SterSTFn 900 —Ml 
SterUn 1108 +06 
TSWEd IftST’ — ir3 
TSWFtx 974 —05 
T5WtoB 1307—04 
RChTcxig rod 774 +31 


AsiaTT 972 —14 
BalTrnx 936 
GIFxInTr nl0J>S — 05 
GwthTrjDc 90s +.13 
intEaTrnUM +in 
SIGvFIT 9J4 —07 
SmCoriT 901 +.10 
TEHTrnx9J6 — 07 
TaxFnYnx9J5 — 08 
VaiueTrnxIO0O+04i 
1349 +J5 

p 3287 03 

RTFdnfp35J6 +08 
Gavsecp 1301 
MMCOPP2877 
SocAwp 2670 _. 

RhmoBd 934 —OS 
gmcnstk 1173 +.14 
RtoertnE 90655 +JI7 
RJverhGVlxS.ls — 09 


BbjBy 1220 +06 

Fxdln 943 —08 

TNMuCb 90? 



NiCh6 


Contra n H0O 

EmGrp 1808 +39 
VTOPtus: 1302 +78 
HartMhrHe 
BdGrawplX78 +04 
RaMup 1733 —09 
LtdNYp 12 2 
oonty Sqime. 
Dhrinp. 1240 .. 

Gronvihp 1670^4+38 

GvSecnx 9.17—18 
GrtflX 1652 
MfdWQr 1134 +03 
Reycettoedc 
PennMu .608 +02 
egtoc 534 +02 
OTC 679 +04 
Premier n 639 +06 
VTOuetn 940 +03 
RtHhmfira Group: 
AmGasn 1004 —09 
■ USGLBft 699—10 
LE Inin 8J6-— J» 

- MDTFn 1048 —05 
VATFn 1073 —06 
RydxNova 902 
RvdexURSSbdJ! ... 
SBCWUIn 942 —03 , 
SBCWMGf 1612 +.13-1 


CopGrn 7J1 +.U 

S |^cp t 1138 +07 
Bond npx 1612 —13 
BdhMlx p K 979 — » 
CapGrrncTtM +7& 
topDtosnl.57 - 
GNMAP 974 -07 
tmmxffldo*J2 —12 
SMGvrm 977— JR 
totiFxtopo>040 +01 
tWMnmc ,1073 —OB 
HMiO 90* — JB 
MNP TftS-jn 
EqlncnmlX5B rjBS 
EqtodxnpK07 -yjo 
KSTF x 1034 — 06 
MMCGP 1655 +.19 
PA*tonn«42 — m 
SrtlCbBPTl223 +38 
Value np 10J7- +J5 
Ca>A npx 1403 +.11 
iLFe iVwt 406 +04 
SIT Fuodt 
GrtWnc SUM +72 
Growth n ILM +.14, 
Wl - 1800 +JMj 

■ MutoTF 906 _ 

TaxFfW fi 94* —M 
USGOV. 1634—02 
STIOossk; 
AmgrTra<7.sz_+J» 
Bom-roc • 947 — ffl 
CdpGrtpMllTl +01 
CanGrT x 1137 +.12 


903—02 
CATFir 1625—07 
Govg.- . 

totHndx 1033 +XD 
NBTFBn 90T 

1000 rx 1221 _ 

" Ip 907 —A3 
937 +.11 
1449 +02 

B*£mtoEdnlL£3'+JF 
1£M +30 

iSi S 

wam*jBsi?a 

GCmCo 1650 +03 
GTOdn 1X57 —31 
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- C */. 
* i » SI -• . * 


ff^wjnteriMriiohdl Bondi Issues 


BVTERNAnONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 4 , 1994 

Bonds Have f The Week Ahead; World 


Page 11 


The Week Ahead: World Economic Calendar, July 4-8 


Amount 


Mat. Price _«nd 


P^ttngRatoMotoo 

Bonk of Tokyo - j 

CurocooHoWng 

Korea Long-Term j 

Crech Bank 


20M - T4 T00^5 : ,— : 


1999. 0L3D 100 


Portugal 

Gracechwch' 

Mortgage Finance 
Nbr3 

Crficfit Load de 

frrnoe 

Prime Target 


MAlJDOO 2003 Star 99.90 — 

"*2,500 1999 vw 99.834 - 


2029 'too '100 — 


Y 10,000' '2001 0395 NXL»' ^ 


Y 20,500-' 1997 Ojo TOO — 


RmKwipoM 

General fledric $150 

Capital Gyp, 

HatHax Building $ 15 Q 

Sodefy • 

Motiond Power Gap. $100 

Nesrife Ho ldings $200 

President Enterprise $100 

Carp. 

Comit finance Jersey itiSOjOOO 


- Umh wf be VS orer fawnth Libor wd* lOTj***" iaua « 
otfcblatopcr. lh t md tar a fntedSiWL Foot 0.325%. Owion*- 
. notiotn S5Q1W00. (B«* d Tolgo Capri Mortefe.1 

. Over &aoMh Ubor. fad— m** U c* par m 1997. Feat not 
'dedcwcL Den u m i<mi&m STBlOOfl PKB Ma) 

Menu) viiO be the laooJh Libor flat. NoaeoBoWe fw 
(L20^ }Bayaritd» Verwwbffifc.) 

Ovar 3-tncrth Libor. Noncoflobta. Fern. 0.15*. (Ctamxfie 
Bonk) ’ _ 

Intimst m 3 bo 020 ew jtaontii LbocuoNl 300V (hereafter 
Mow. faofhrcd at 99.90. Averaflo Be 180 yean. Fea 
030% Denananction* tlOWOO. (Bardoy* do Toots Wedd.) 

Manta wit be 0393 baton* tanoath Ubor uiti Mew. 1999, 
. Aendftor a ft»d 5J0% Cafafafe of par fan 1999. ha net 
<fadoml.Donc*n in a6om lOOtnflfionyan. {MitobiiSi Knonee.] 

Omltnonb Libor. NdncoBolile. Fees nTOdsdowdOat^ 
ncanra NX> nx&an yen (No«Ma Inti) 


Nederiandse 
Investermgs voar' 
Ontwilckefingslcmden 


QntwikkeCng 
SBC Fwarwe' 


ECU 150 


European Investment ■ C$150 
Bonk 

New South Wales Aw$100 

Treasury Carp. 

LB Rhetnland-Pfatz Y 10,000 

Ontario YlO/JOO 

South Australia Y 22,500 

Government 

financing Authority 

State Bank of New Y 10,000 

South Wales 

Toyota Motor Credit Y 20,000 

Carp. 

Xerox -• r2QJtnO 

EgultyUnfcmd : 

Ayala Land $100 


6M lOOjRfl 99.48 finoffaredl at 99345. Nancolabie. Few lft% (Bradoy* da 
Zoata Weddj 

«4 101 .095 99.60 feaffonriai 99.92. 

■MarW) 

9K 99A 12 siwimwody. Nontntobfa. Feat 05375%. Dminmo 

: ilOtmOO fttargan Staitoy lml| 

6H 100.962 99 JA feofiwradta9y.775.NonoaBablaLF—ilft%.(C5 Fin* Bataan.) 

zero 100 — feHcemofalnta 15032 to 1999. Gcn«rtMa into shore* of Ten 

. - Yi bxkstnd Corp. ot an expected 12% pronnura. Feet not 
i /fado sn rf Dv njm r x t xmi S10AXX fBcnke/s That Ml) 

.10 9915 .. — bechangtabte in 1999 tor an TOT paying V> ew frawth 

Libor. FiMglbk wt* ootstanrino iaoo, roiang total amount to 
150 b*on Era. Fen not B fa efaw ri . (Bancn Gommaroafe 
bafianaj 

715 101 9975 feoHared at 100ft. Noncedtotita. FungUe v*h outstanding 

mm, robing Md amount to 350 rattan guilders. Fees 1%. 
(Rebobafc) ' 

714 10133 9930 feoffor ad at 9931 Noncatofafo. Fees 1WN. (Swiss Bank 

Corp) 

9 103375 10030 feoffowd at 9935. Ncwafebkt ito (Dc^ 


4 Vt 90.129 — Stmicnniafly. NoncoflaUe. Fees 1H%. (Nomura tnd) 


330 100 — No najfl oblc. Fees oat dbdessd. (Sdomoa Srolhin NT) 

330 100 — briarM* wifl be 330% in foti year, rtwreoher 170%. Nonajlo- 

bte. Fins aot dbdassd DenaoinaKans 100 nriSan yea. [No- 
fauro toTJ • 

335 100487 •— Nonadcfcfo, Foes 0375% (Merril Lynch tat'L) 


1997 3 10030 — 


1999 4 - T0ai7 — 


Interest w3l be 3% in first year, 140% in second year end 
330% in tbM yen. Nona**!* Fis«f 030% OvanMiam 
10 ndtan yen. (Mernl Lynch Ml) 

Nonoakbie. Fees not efisdond. Fungible with outstanding 
issue, rosing told amount to 70 bHon yon. Danorainalions 
100 mHon yen. (Nomura IrtT) 


199? - 4A5 100 ■ — Nonorfbbte. fees 030%. jMerr® tyndi liit'L) 


2000 open 100 — 


Coupon imSealadotd to4ft%. Noncafabb. CorwertiblB or an 
expected 4 to 8% premium. Fees 2W%. (Morgen Stanley Irtl) 


Mannesmann Details Errors 


Bktamliag ^aiaea Siting- ' ■ 

MUNICH — The chief exec- 
Dtive of Mannesmann AG, 
Wemer Meter, acfcnowledged- 
Ia an interview published Sun- . 
day ih ay he- had made mistakes 
in orders, leadmg to the>l(«al 
inquiry into his activities that- 
b^gan last wedc. 

“Today we’re cleverer, we 
could have organized some 
things better or differently,” 
Mr. Dieter told the German 
newsmagazine Focus. 

Dflssddorf public prosccu- 
. tors began an inyestigation Fii-: 
day into aDegaticxis , that Mr. 

; Wemer had routed orders' from 
■ the Mannesmann subsidiary 
Rexroth, a maker of drive sys- 
tems, to Hydac, a company in 


wiridi'Mr. Djetefs fonrily owns 
a majority stake. 

The inquiry, is expected to 
damage Mr. Dieter’s chances of 
becoming .head of Mannes- 
maim’s supenasory board after 
an annual shareholder meeting 
- on Friday. Mr. Dieter,b4, is due 
to retire as chief executive af ter 
nine years at the hehn. 

In a separate report, Der 
Spiegel said that Mann es- 
rn ann’s supervisory ’board 
would bold an. extraordinaiy 
meetmg on Wednesday to vote 
on vdioher' to. dec* Mr. Meter 
to serve on- the body. 

In the Focus interview, Mr. 
Dieter again denied that he had 

committed any crime. 

He said that he had kept his 


family’ 8 stake in Hydac secret 
to ensure it received orders 
from companies other than 

Mannesm^mi. 

■. Daimler Offer ^Successful’ 

Daimler-Benz AG’s global 
rights offering has been “ex- 
tremely successful,” Bloomberg 
Business News quoted Deut- 
sche Bank AG, the leading un- 
derwriter of the sale, as saying 
on Sunday. 

The offering, of 4456 nriflion 
new shares at 640. Deutsche 
marks ($401) each, was priced 
about 10 pocent below ana- 
lysts’ expectations. 

If fully subscribed, the 1-for- 
10 offer, which began June 20 
and expires Tuesday, will raise 
about 3 bflhon DM. 


Prudential To Close 30 US. Offices 


Bbondmg Busam Net* ■ 

NEWARK, New Jersey — Prudential Insur- 
ance Co. of America said it planned to dose 
about 30 offices throughout the United States 
and ftKminwtft about 800 Jobs over the next 18 
months. 

The job cuts, most of which the insurer aqjects 
to come from attrition and early retirement, 
affect the company’s Prudential Preferred unit. 
The 800 jobs slated for dfamnation comprise 
about 13 percent of the unit’s work force of 
about 6,000. 

Ii isn’t dear bow many of thejob cuts, if my, 
would be made through layoffs, said Robert 
, DeFiHippo, company spokesman. 


TO OUR READERS IN BELGIUM 

It's never been easier to subscribe 
nnrl save. Just call toll-free: 

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A Case of 
G-7 Jitters 

Seven 

NEW YORK — Two meet- 
ings, one report and an ailing 
currency should keep U.S. 
Treasuries on the edge and un- 
do 1 sfiOing pressure next week, 
analysts said. 

‘^fhe marke t is going to be 
very nervous, because of uncer- 
tainty about the UJS. Federal 
Reserve Open Market Commit- 
tee meeting, uncertainty about 
the G-7, and uncertainty about 
the non-farm payrolls.” said 
Donald Maude, chief strategist 
at ScotiaMcLeod. 

“Add to this the spectre of a 
weaker dollar.* 

The Federal Open Market 
Committee is set to meet Tues- 
day and Wednesday, amid ex- 
pectations of another federal 
funds rate increase, while the 
Group of Seven industrial na- 
tions leaders will begin a meet- 
ing in Naples on Friday. 

What the Fed will do is par- 
ticularly sensitive because or its 
effect on U.S. capital markets. 
Another stock or bond seD-off 
would hurt the dollar, and fur- 
ther upset these markets. 

The decision may also be 
seen as a test of the Federal 
Reserve’s credibility ahead of 
the June US. employment re- 
port, due out Friday, analysts 


A schmfvl* tt pus M«M'f economic ana 

firt*r>oaJ events, comptltd tor trm irrterrut- 
harml Marta Trftune Of Bioomcxrg Sus- 
nessiwms 


•***4 Mdboume Ausrafca 5 New 
ZwUmo Bank surwy on haHwoanwc jes 
ohwiaiwnis ter June Forecast' 
Sfowm ol atxjut 1.5 percent 
Jakarta Peruana Finance to ibt ana 
rata on the Jakarta Stock Exchange 
Tptqfo Bank of Jaoan to hold a quartan, 
meeting ol branch managers; Bank ot Ja- 
pan Gov. Yaousta Mteno to give operung 
www at i«a Osaka 6«neh manager 

te Qw a press conference) a HQQ. 
Drawi managers of Nagoya, Sapporo 
anff Fukuoka to gwa a footf gross esntar- 
enceatiMS. 

• **ty 9 Canberra Australian reia-i 
trace data tor May. Forecast Up abouf 1 £ 
percent. 

Spfaay Reserve Bank of Austraka fa 
ha« montoty meeting, “crecast No on. 
modwte bfung m DanJ-’s 4.75 percent 
bonchnwh shorvtorm rata. 

Singapore Yea Wap Seng Lto. bosot- 
dnery general meeting where anarenoia- 
ers. vow on removing Alan Yao as chair- 
man of the company. 

9 Canbavra Auairalian Prime 
Minister Paul Keasng to meet New Zee- 

(end Ptwo iwroaMr jun Boiger. Topic, 
bilareral trade ties. 

Tokyo Bank of Japan Gov. Yasushi 
Mreno to give a regular press conference. 
Ea r n i ngs axp s eta d today BuiBmora in- 
tamaamnd. 

kMy 7 Cartomra Ausaafian labor 
force dan tor June. Forecast unemploy- 
ment rata to nae to 93 percent empicy- 
ment to sho«r gam of 21,000 jeos. 

•My 9 Kong Kong G ora’s Segal of 
the International tnstituta tor Soaiegic 
Snxtteg to gnre luncheon speech to Hong 
Kong’s Foreign Correspondent' Out 


Euurop» 

ajoty 4 Brussels June unemptey- 
mero figures. 

Frenkturt BunOesoank Cftiel EconoRUsi 
Ooc» tssaig addnoaea annual German 
stock exchange meeting. 

Parts Bank ol France securities repur- 
chase tender. Outlook; 523 WUon francs 
GxfMnng 

Earning* wp » ct a d today Scottish a 
Newc as tle Pic. 

Eip a cfatl anytime MU* wafik 
Frenkturt May manufacturing ontan. 
Forecast Up 03ft. 

•JufyS London May housing nans, 
parts Aprs mdustrwf peoatKXon. Fore- 
cast Up 0.4 percent 
Parts April manufacturing production 
Forecast: Up a* percent 
Bom European Correnssion President 
J a cs u ca Detors meals Goman Foreign 
Monster Klaus KmM to docuss Europe- 
an Un«n pnomws Wr nart s« months. 
•July a Frenkturt June unemploy- 
ment rate • west SA Forecast Up 10.000 
aireomn. 

London Mey manufacturing output. 
Forecast Up 02 percent m moran. uo 1.6 
percent in year. 

London May industrial production. 
Forecast Up 03 pareent m montn. 

•My 7 Baael June unomptoyment 

rare. 

Copenhagen ApnLMay industrial or- 
ders. 

Frenkturt German Bundesbank central 
council meeting. 

Patti French to-year ana 3d-year OAT 
auction. Oufkxik. ZODOion francs expect- 
ed 

Pans Regular monthly Treasury bond 
auction. 

Parti Bank of France securities repur- 
chase tender. Outiook 68 hi lion Irenes 
expiring. 

•Mr 8 Anntorrtwm June consumer 
pnea index. Forecast Down 03 percent 
m month, up 3 j 0 percere in year. 

Naples Grotto Of Seven industrial na- 
tions leaders to meat, through Sunday. 


SSSsS New Suit in BCCI Case 


“If s going to be a dose call 
for the FOMC,” said Mr. 
Maude, who did not anticipate 
an increase in the 4-1 /4 percent 
Federal funds rale. 

Mr. Maude said the market 
would interpret a fifth tightening 
in as many months as signaling 
that “the Fed is seeing more in- 
flation than we think.” 

Such a scenario would put (o 
the test the Group of Seven 
leading industrial nations* re- 
solve, or ability, to deal with a 
doDar crisis when they meet in 


All of the cuts will come from office staff 
rather than from the ranks of agents who sell 
pofidesy Mr. DeFiHippo said. The unit’s work 
, force is currently split evenly between adminis- 
trative and sales staff, he said. 

After the cots, the Prudential Preferred unit 
will have 76 offices, down from 105 offices now. 
The unit se&s annuities and life insurance poli- 
cies to PrudentiaTs wealthier customers. 

Among the rites to be dosed are four regional 
marketing offices in Houston and Minneapolis, 
as well as in New Jersey and California. 

The regional offices will be consolidated -over 
the next 13 or 14 months into the Prudential 
unit’s Basking Ridge, New Jersey, headquarters, 
Mr. DeFBlippo said. 


Naples. 

VIOLIN: 

A Novel Model 

Coatmned front Pigge 9 

of bis clarinets with Mr. Laur- 
ence’s composites. 

Before CCPL was launched 
last year with 1-2 miltion francs 
in government subsidies and 
additional backing from a doz- 
en friends and family members, 
Mr. Laurence spent four years 
developing Ms product with the 
‘‘invaluable” free aid of re- 
searchers at a local engineering 
university. He said he kept the 
engineers motivated by break- 
ing his objective into projects 
that, would challenge them. 

No matter the advantages of- 
fered by carbon violins, howev- 
er, finding buyers will be diffi- 

‘T'^^OTwfflbe a barrier,” 
said Brian Yule, edixorot Strad, 
a British magazine about string 
instruments. “People think vio- 
lins should be made of wood.” 

Another French company, 
ATN International, came out 
with a carbon fiber violin sever- 
al years ago. but was farced to 
abandon the effort “Violinists j 
are very conservative, and they | 
were reticent to buy ” said Jean- 1 
Claude Lagarde. preskleni of i 
ATN. Since then, Mr. Lagarde I 
has focused cm a less conserva- 
tive group — players of double 
basses and cellos. 

Mr. Laurence acknowledges 
the resistance, but says it comes 
more from the instrument mer- 
chants — who usually aren’t 
violinists — than the musicians 
themselves. 

“If we can win over the musi- 
cians,” he said, “the merchants 
wiD follow. ” 

Articles in this series appear on 
alternate Mondays. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

EVGEHSOLL-RAND 

COMPANY 

(CPUs ) 

The undersigned announce* Ihal die 
First Quarter report 19W of 
bgcrmfl-iUBd will be available 
in Amsterdam at: 

ABN AMRO Bank IV. V. 
MEESPIERSON N.V. 

KAS-ASSO CIATIE N.V. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Amsterdam, June 28, 1994. 


Washmiion Post Serrtce 

WASHINGTON — The 
lawyers and accountants who 
are trying to collect money for 
the depositors of the Bank of 
Credit & Commerce Interna- 
tional, the failed international 
ban It, have filed a $SS million 
lawsuit against Clark M. Clif- 
ford, Robert A. Altman and 15 
other Washington lawyers. 

The civil lawsuit alleges that 
Mr. Clifford and Mr. Altman, 
as lawyers for the BCCI and for 
First American Bankshares 
Inc., bad “an irreconcilable 
conflict of interest” because of 
their simultaneous representa- 
tion of the two institutions. 

BCCI was closed by regula- 
tors around the world in 1991. 
following revelations of wide- 


doQars in losses to depositors 
abroad. The bank illegally 
owned four VS. banks, includ- 
ing First American, which was 
run by former defense secretary 
Mr. Clifford and his protegi 
Mr. Altman for a decade before 
regulators ordered it sold. 

The lawsuit, filed by BCCI 
liquidators in federal court in 
the District, seeks to recoup al- 
legedly “illicit benefits” that 
went to Mr. Clifford and Mr. 
Altman, including $6 million 
BCCI paid them in legal fees 
and $9 million the two made 
from “lucrative insider stock 
transactions and other benefi- 
cial financial arrangements,” 
according to court papers. 

While acting as lawyers for 
the BCCI group, Mr. Clifford 
and Mr. Altman borrowed 515 
million from BCCI at favorable 
interest rates in 1986 to pur- 

For investment 
information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the 1HT 


US Jtkxw ItTMl 

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74 6 

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770 

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1ST 

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431*50 

ECP 

677620 

*78786 1058340 3687*78 

raw 

2377188 3075180 4123040 HUOTM 

Source: Euroclcar, COM 


Ubor Rates 


Mf 1 


1-atmtt] Unann 

4-nUMdh 

ust 

4ft 

* 15/14 

55/1* 

Dwbdenwi 5 

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PMtota 

1 51/14 

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5ft 

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5ft 

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aft 

Yen 

21/76 

73/74 

73 nt 

Sources: Uorda Bantu Ranters. 



Ttw Anwrlci 

■J u ly 9 Crtgary Trie international 
Road FKfeMrtion w»n open ® fttaday con- 
ference. 

Itadeo City Unuco's oppoertton Na- 
bonai Anton Party presaws •» evaluation 
ol the countfy's voter regrtvabon hss 
■July 4 Buanoi Aim Juneeoreum- 
ar price index. Outlook Up aeon 03 per- 
cent. 

Sraflago June inflation rate. 

Stock markets to close early at 2:30 pjn. 



and banks m 330 Dj» , as Brazd plays the 
U.S. m WoricJ Cup. 

IMM SOW MMpendenoo Day hob- 
day. Financial marHets are cwseo. 

•My * Washington Two-day Feder- 
al Open Marhel Committee mooting. 
W art fingtnn Federal National Mortgage 
Association announces auctions. 

Haw York Johnson Reobook research 
aarvico rHasoac its weekly survey of 
sales m more man 20 depen- 
rrmnt, discount ana c hem stores in tne 
US 

twang" Central bank debt auction of 
13 ml Hi on Urudad de Foments (S29.7 
million) . Outiook: Hates lime changed. 
»o (to Janeiro The central bank expect- 
ed to auction 28-cay debt central bank 
notes. Outlook: Hares seen about the 
same as the owerreghl rate. 

Eanfioge aapadad today Hoadway Ser- 
wceaine. 

■July e Detroit June U-S. Vehicle 


Sates Automakers report sales of new 
can and light mots lor June Outiook. 
Down to an annual rata of t43 iwuon. 
from 14.6 million rfi May. 

Washington May housing completions 
Sin Franctaco Two-day connrence on 
damrewras sponsored by the wfernation- 
af Swaps and Derivatives Assocxtitort. 
Was h ington The American Petrowum 
institute issues ns weekly report on U3. 
Petroleum stocks, production, imports 
and refinery uffization. 

Aritogtoe, Vil The American Gas Asso- 
ciation ratsasos da weekly U.S natural 
gas inventory report. 

Washington Hie Mortgage Bankers Afr- 
aoaa t wn of America releases ns weekly 
resort on mortgage applications 
New York Money Magazine/ABC News 
release war weekly consumer confi- 
dence index. 

Eanttngs expected today Co-^gr&lnc. 
Fresh Choice me.. General Has Corp- 
■July 7 Washington May wnossaie 
rata. 

Washington June treasury securities 
Stripping- 

Washington June chain store sales 
Wa sh ing to n The Department ol Energy 
Issues its weakly report on US petroleum 
stocks, production, imports ana re finery 
utifazabon. 

W ashi ngto n The Labor Department re- 
ports «r>rfiai weekly stale unamp.'oymem 
compensation insurance claims 
W ashin g to n The Treasury Department 
reports weekly money supply. 

Ottawa June's htfp^wanted mwn re- 
port 

Earnings expected today Camcex 
Corp, King World Productions. Ladiaw 
Inc, Nike int, Payenex Inc 
■July & Washington June employ- 
ment report. 

Washington May consumer credit 
Washington Student Loan Marketing 
Association announces auctions. 

Ottawa June's labor lorce survey. 
Washington The Federal Reserve re- 
leases its weekly report ol assets and 
liabilities of U.S commercial banks. 


chase stock in BCCTs parent . 
company. That money was a i 
nonrecourse loan, one backed ' 
only by the stock itself. 

Neither Mr. Clifford nor Mr. j 
Altman could be reached for 
comment late Friday. . 

The suit also names lawyers ' 
Paul C. Warnke, a former secre- 
tary of defense, and Baldwin i 
Tuule. a former lawyer at the 
Federal Reserve currently with 
Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & Me- 1 
Cloy. 

j Euromarls 

i At a Glance 

, 

I Eurobond Yields 

I JutylJWLtt Yrkloti Yrkm 


Soares: Luxembourg Stock EnMnsn 

Weekly Sates jun.30 

Prti»vM»fcW 

CMd EoroOmr 

t Nous f »«— « 

SboMits ttUH IWJO 1037 JO 1JC1J0 

Cwwt 7Z3B Ota 47 JO HIP 

Fit Hi - - UO»J0 476J0 

■cp 4jajo ljoue ludog 4jw.w 

Tow tJMJO fiftiMfl 15.14SJU A04SJ0 


This week's topics: 

O The World’s Most Valuable Companies 
O The Emerging-Market Play Is Alive And Well 
O Can Clinton Regain Global Economic Credibility? 
o China's Markets Mess 
O Why Peter Davis Quit Reed Elsevier 

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Page 12 


r':— 1 ' 


/ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 4, 1994 


Perils of Picking Winning Funds 


Washington Port Service 

NEW YORK — Picking a mutual fund 
today on the basis of what it did last year 
can be disastrous. Consider. Lexington 
Strategic Investments, the top fund in the 
United States in 1993, is down 12 percent 
already this year, compared with a 3 per- 
cent drop for the Dow Jones industrial 
average. The top two foreign stock funds 
in 1993 — Morgan Stanley Institutional 
Asian and Fidelity Emerging Markets — 
are each down 18 percent in 1994. And 
American Heritage, a broad-based fund 
that returned 41 percent last year, has 
given up all those gains over the past six 
months. 

When you’re predicting who will win 
next year's World Series, it makes sense to 
look first at last October’s winner. 

But financial managers, advisers and 
newsletter writers who have great records 
one year frequently have lousy ones the 
next. These erratic performances seem to 
imply that choosing investments isn't real- 
ly a rational exercise. The winners are just 
lucky, and they don't stay lucky for long. 

But not so fast. The new issue of The 
Hulbcrt Financial Digest has some good 
news for those of us who cling to the belief 
that some people really can make sense of 
the market. 


Editor Mark Hulberfs study points the 
way to finding these market gurus. His 
message is simple: Pick advisers by looking 
at their long-term records, going bade at 
least five years. 

“Don’t choose on the basis of one year’s 
performance,” Mr. Hulben said. “Indeed, 
if the only track records you have for 
advisers are for just the last 12 months, 
you'd do just as well going with those at 
the bottom of the rankings as those at the 
top. You might as well flip a coin." 

This advice is especially compelling 
right now, at the end of the first half of the 
year, when newspapers and business mag- 
azines will be fiHea with mutual fund re- 
sults and rankings. 

If you've had a particularly frustrating 
time with your mutual funds — if they're 
down 8 or 10 percent — you may be 
thinkin g of switching into funds that 
topped the lists over the last six or 12 
months. Resist the urge. 

Here’s why: Mr. Huibert’s own newslet- 
ter tracks the specific investment advice of 
162 other newsletters. When he started in 
1980, Mr. Hulbert tracked just three doz- 
en, and 19 of those have survived 14 years 
of publication. 


Mr. Hulbert ranked those 19 newsletters 
according to the total return of their rec- 
ommended portfolios over the seven-year 
period from June 1980 to June 1987. Then 
he ranked the same 19 on the basis of their 
returns from June 1987 to April 1994. 

The result: “The newsletters' ranks in 
the second period are pretty dose to their 
ranks in the first” 

For example, the Value Line Investment 
Survey ranked second over the first seven 
years and third over the next seven. 

The Chartist moved from third to first: 
the Zweig Forecast from fourth to second 
What funds have performed best over the 
past !0 years? Some of the ones currently 
open to new investors are AIM Yalue, 
Berger 100, Kaufmann, Putnam Voyager, 
Thomson Opportunity, CGM Capital De- 
velopment, Fidelity Contrafund and 
Growth Company, and Guardian Park 
Avenue. All have returned an average of at 
least 17 percent annually. 

But don't load up on shares too quickly. 
Some of these funds are particularly risky; 
others have investment styles that might 
not fit your own. 

And long-term success doesn't guaran- 
tee future profits. 


Merger Dims Sale Hopes for Missouri Railroad 


By Conrad de Aenlle 

Special to the Herald Tribune 

A victim of last week’s merger agree- 
ment between rail carriers Burlington 
Northern Inc. and Santa Fe Pacific Corp. 
could be Kansas City Southern Industries 
Inc., which has been working on a plan to 
sell its core holding, the century-old Kan- 
sas City Southern Rahway, in order to 
concentrate on its growing passion: finan- 
cial services. 

Kansas City Southern, responding in 
May to months-old rumors that the rail- 
road was for sale, said it was conducting a 
“review relating to transportation opera- 
tions." Discussions were under way with 
several railroad operators, the company 
said, although “no specific proposals are 
under consideration." 

On Wan Street, however, speculation 
grew that the railroad might fetch as much 
as S2 billion from one of several potential 
buyers, and Burlington Northern was the 
name that came up most often. Its routes 
in the Plains and Pacific Northwest, ob- 
servers said, would make a good fit with 
Kansas City Southern's system, which 
runs from the Midwest down to the Gulf of 
Mexico, then east. 

The merger, which would create the 
largest UJ5. railroad and could take years 
to complete, has probably taken Burling- 
ton out of the Kansas City Southern pic- 
ture. But some railroad industry analysts 
are saying the picture was not very bright 
to begin with. 

Es tima tes being tossed around of the rail- 
road's value — $ 1 J> billion to $2 billion — 
were simply too hi g h , say many. Indeed, $2 


billion works out to nearly $45 a share, 
about the price Kansas City Southern's 
shares reached the day of the announce- 
ment- And railroad operations account for 
only about half of the company’s total sales. 

“The price I believe th^y are seeking 
indudes the growth potential of the rail- 
road,” said Steve Lewins, who follows the 
industry for Gruntal & Co. in New York. 
That potential is substantial, he said, “but 
the price they are asking would make the 
buyer purchase the risk of that growth." 

Kansas City Southern has been in this 
situation before, Mr. Lemons noted: “Ten 
years ago Burlington was willing to pay 
$ 300 mutton to $350 million for the rail- 
road. Kansas City might have taken $400 
million to 5450 million, but they never 
closed the gap. Kansas City always sees the 
growth potential and they mark it up: the 
buyers always see the risk and mark it 
down.” 

Susan Chapman, an analyst at Forbes. 
Walsh, Kelly in New York, said that with 
the agreement set between Burlington and 
Santa Fe, “KGSI may pull the railroad off 
the market for a while.” 

Michael Lloyd, who follows Kansas 
City Southern for NatWest Securities, was 
more hopeful. Its system “fits strategically 
with a couple of railroads that can pay 
more because they can benefit from syner- 
gies,” he observed. “Illinois Central, even 
though it's a smaller railroad, is looking at 
the fit with Kansas City Southern to the 
Gulf. C anadian Pacific, if they wanted to 
invest more in the U.S-, would be a natural 
geographic extension." 

Officials at Kansas City Southern de- 


clined to discuss either the plans for the 
railroad or the Burlington-Santa Fe deal. 
But it has been known for some rime that 
the company believes its future lies in 
financial services, a field in which it has 
achieved great success. 

Since 1984, Kansas City Southern has 
held an 81 percent stake in Janus Capital 
Corp., one of the fastest-growing UJS. fund 
providers, with more than $22 biOion in 
assets under management. When the rail- 
road review was announced, Kansas City 
Southern also said it was boosting its stake 
in the well-regarded Berger Associates 
fund management company to 80 percent 
from 18 percent. 

Kansas City Southern's investment 
business has been growing much faster 
than its railroad, ana now generates more 
than half the company’s revenue. Still, 
analysts say that with the American rail 
industry showing growth for the first time 
since World War n. both sectors of Kansas 
City Southern's operations are healthy. 

That has been reflected in the compa- 
ny's operating earnings, which tripled be- 
tween 1989 and 1993. and in its share 
price, which briefly climbed above $50 a 
few months ago after spending much of the 
1980s hibernating in the $10 to $20 range. 
Kansas City Southern’s shares closed Fri- 
day at 41%. 

That's why Mr. Lloyd believes the com- 
pany may be better off if a deal for the 
railroad does not go through: ‘The soaring 
stock price of the combined entity over the 
last two to three years has handsomely 
rewarded shareholders. An argument can 
be made that you shouldn't change the 
formula.” 




0 




& 


bnce 1928 we've served Winston Churchill, 
Alexander of Yugoslavia, Marlene Dietrich and many others. 
Now it is your turn. 



Newly restored, and now receiving guests. 


o. 

C 



P A « I 3 




ITT Sheraton Luxury Collection 


7 tie Prince Jc Gaffes is tact to its original splendor. 

During 6 months of renovation, each area of this luxurious hotel huik in 1028, has beer, entinhf restored by experts. 
Prowling die hast service and comfort for our guests, whilst mamtahmy the specific Jam of the 30's. 

Par reservations at anu Luxury Collection hotel or Sheraton livers, 
caff the ITT Sheraton vxrtUuntk reservation office nearest you or your hare/ spccfafisL 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


Consolidated trading for week 
ended Friday, July 7. * 
(Continued) 


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o N DAY 


EVTERNA'nONAt HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 4, 1994 


Page 13 




r -J-. i 


■{ 

■':■ - -y 

-• *• 


• . _ -r > •- 


linger Win 
On Mark-IN 

• ■■ w 

FranccPratc 

MOUNT JULIET, Instead 
— Bernhard Langer ended 
yorag Australian Robert Al- 

1 dream of winning the 
Irish Open when he sany a-25- 
foot birdie putt at the 16th hole 
Sunday. 

Aflcnby, die overnight leader 
by three strokes, John Daly of 
the United States and 
were, tied when the 36-year-old 
German, hawing bogeyed the 
15th, produced his moment of 
yrjagj f c 

He had brrdied four of the 
first five holes and then the 
ninth to card 31 on the front 
nine. His final round 67, for 13- 


h With Daly , LPGA Golfer Shot at Store U . S . Dominates Henley Fights 


under-par- 275, gawe. ; him ; .lu5 ■ 
fhirri Irish title and at least one 
victory on the European tour in - 
each of the last 16 years, a re- 
cord he described as' very spe- 
cial to him./ - • 

“Not many do that, * r he said. 

AHenbyand Daly, whosbot a 
course-ra»rd-tying 65 on the 
fintd- roimd, finisfied. a stroke 
back. Daly, who had started the 
day seven the lead, carded 3s 
at the first tix holes, going bird- 
ie, birdie, par, birdie, eagle, par. 
He then birdied the 10th and 
1 3th to go 12 under to share the 
lead. But he was already in the 
clubhouse by the time Langer- 
parted the last two holes. 


SCOREBOARD 


BASEBALL 


Major League Standings 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
tatNiMM 


an 221 om-aio 

■01 Ml 3BM— • > 




W l 

Pet 

08 

■ - 

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TOO 


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Of Of 

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11 


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32 45 

TO 6 

IS 

" *-*. 


Central DMsion 



”• •*- 

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46 TO 

MB 


: to 

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■SB4 

1% 


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41 37 

306 

6 

. “ * ' 

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7 

1 ‘ - -ra." -■ 

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37 42 

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io% 

‘ , 


WbRMvMm 




Taras 

07 41 

474 

_ 


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35 44 

TOO 

2% 

* 

Oakland 

33 46 

TOB 

4% 


CaBtarnla 

33 47 

TO3 

5 

— ■■* 

NATIONAL LEADUR 


a., _ 


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TO3 

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' '' 

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443 

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’ ' J 


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_ 

- 

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sn 

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i § , 

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,4# * 

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429 

12 

- •• i . 


MtatDMiin 




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42 TO 

JSS 




Colorado 

37 44 

457 

5% 


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TOO 

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-• 6 ' 

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32 TO 

JM 

10% 


Friday's Une Scores 

AMERICAN LEAGUE 
Detroit in mb no— t n 2 

Tens* MO on 0(M— 10 14 t 

Ftna Game 

Gohr. GordLier (6), H e w neman (8), Groom 
(I) and Tetthrion; Brown. Carpenter (3), Whi- 
teside <U. Oliver «>r Hcnk» W md Orth. 
W-OUvor W, M. IHOMM U. VI 
HRs-Ogfrott K-Gltaon do. Tom* Conseco 
(23). J.Goraaiex (12). 


Gudlcfcaoc. Boever (7), Codoret IB), and 
Kreoton Dettmer. Sraltta IS, Whttetkta (ft), 
.Henke (ft) one Rodriguez. W — Wb He rid e, 2-1. 
L-*og*ef,M.Svr-He«lce (7). HR»— Oetrolt, 
KAHtaan (IS). Ml* IW. Tnn, Greer Uh 
RMrluwr TO. Palmer rw. 

Oasauma SM NO MW u t 

■omob - no OH MW f o 

Darling, Later (V). Eckerter 19) era 
Stetobody VonEgmond, TrWcric (7>. VuWex 
15). Howard (2), Ruaeil TO and BerrvMH. 
W— DorUng. 6-9. L— VanEamoad. 0 - 2 . 
KRjH-flMton, ALVaugtBi (20). 

Seattle . on Ml MW M ft 

New yet* m 1 m ms n • 

JsiiflMn, RUev (7), Ayala (8) and WHson. 
Hawtman (9); Abbott, Hernandez (9), Haunt 
TO and Levrftz. Note (»). W-Ayata 3-1. 
Lr-HornandsZi 34. HR*— Soothe. WHson CO. 
Mew York, SOvastn tv. 

M hoeMO o HO MO MO— 1 4 0 

donated . BIO Me AM 9 1 

E rlckxoiv Guthrie (7), Campbell C7),Co3lan 
[■). rad Walbeck; Morris and Alomar. 
W-MarrH. 7-t L— erfcjcton. JSL HR* — CM- 
vMand. Mutw 02). Lotte (9L 
Castornie m te too- 7 « 2 

■Mfimore M2 US 2lx — m n 1 

Maaroae, Butcher RLSPringer, (6),L*Bert* 
(7). Grate U) and Myers; Mussina Etenorn 
(ft). Poaia m and HcUev W-MuMha, m. 
lW40Brane , 2&H ft > Gufl herea . temcn 2 
(UL Cirfis (C, CDavis (14). Edmonds (5). 
Battfmons H ammonds 2 (7), Palmeiro (14), 
Gomes fW, RMen tW i Holies (M).- 
MHwtt ute M OM 0M-0 7 0 

n ow— . || ' m H|i n n • 

Scanlon. Lfevd (ft). Hiouero 1U and Voile; 
McDowell and LdVafHora.W-McDawafl,M>. 
L— Scanlon, Hl HA— Ottawa Franca (13). 

Toronto ' 3M OM MM MO-3 0 .0. 

Kansas CRY MO HO 2M MW n 0 

(H rates) . 

Stotflemyre. W.WUltens (9) and Barden; 
Appier, Piehurtto W, Brewer no). Bothnia 
CUHrMaotooraerv (DO.end Mavne. W— MaaL 
oomerv, M. LWCWllUamb. 1-3. 

HATIOHAL LEAGUE 
ADMto ' 200 MO IM 00-3 H 1 

narte mi M M 0W Ml l 

m toetooM 

A very, BwJroston tyj. OtttxHX 7 ) and LoPftt; 
Uantoer. Porez (7), Men (M. -tenstec (10) 


ADenby, who could only par 
the last seven holes, had his 20- 
foot putt for a tie on the last 
hole come up short. 

'Masters' champion Jose- Ma- 
ria Olaz&bal and New Zealand- 
er Greg Turner shared fourth 
place, while Nick Faldo, chas- 
ing a fourth successive title in 
the event, managed only 73 and 
dropped into a tie for eighth. 

• Greg Kraft, who ranks 
169th on the U.S. money list, 
shot 4-under-par 68 to take one- 
stroke lead ova Jeff Sluxnan 
and defending champion Nick 
Price into Sunday’s last round 
of the Motorola western Open 
near Chicago. (AP) 


and Sant logoLW-Jonastone. 1-0- L— OHon.0- 
1 H R - At la nta . MCGrffi Q0). - 
CtoCtoMtf M0 131 MW M 0 

Fttubaroo 1 on w m-i f o 

Roeor. Mcelroy (ft), Bronttay (9) and Tao- 
. b«wM;Waenar,wMto(71,HUMr (ft). Sonant 
(9) and Parrish. W — Ropei-.S-n. L—waoncr.S- 
A Sy-BrmUay TO. HR»— Plttsbun*. « mr- 
cmi (ft), van SMa <5). 

CAttMB 020 OM OH— 3 ft 1 

Koran MB 000 #T1— 2 7 O 

TrachML Myara (9) and smuns; Drabok. 
Venn |9) ami Sorvah. Eunoio (9). 
W— Troehwi.74L— Orotm, toft. Sv— Myors 
(17). HR— CMcaaa Saw 07). 

Colorado MO » 000-4 t 0 

SL Loots OM OM Mr — n 17 • 

Harris, Blair U). Waite (8) and GlrardT; 
Sutcanc, Ponez (ft). Murohy (ft). CtmmoratH 
(7) and McOrlK, W-CuWMtoiM. L-Harrls. 
3-1& Sv — amoram Cl). HUs-Coloratia, 
H aya o U). Johnson (9). 51 Louts, Jefferies 2 
(9), WMtan TO, Pan (7), Lankford (1ft). 
PUtadtedto OM MO MB— 3 7 I 

Las Angelos MO OM toft-4 3 2 

WUt Janet ail and Praff; ©rats, Daaf <M, 
Bams (9), McDopmU TO aid Ptana. 
vs wst 3-ft- L— Grasa, Tfl. s»— Jonw (21). 
Now Yam 320 JN 003-10 10 0 

Sen Dfesn Mi MO 413- 7 9 0 

Janas, Mason (71, Gem TO and Silnmtr; 
Kraagar. Maaror O), Effiaft (ft). Tanaka (I) 
ora Johnson. W .Innw. B-7. L— Kruoanr, 0-1. 
HRs No w York, Bonilla 113). Stuwati (2), 
Uadotnan TO. San Dtaga. Johnson (2). 
Montreal 214 OM M0- 7 « 2 

Sod Fraocfsca >72 B» Mx-M 1 J 0 
PMaMW Hornflo TO, Shaw IS), Watto- 
laad (B) end PMOcnar. Spohr IS); Burkrtt 
Monto loaoa U). Prey (M. Bade (9) and Marv 
wartoa. w- Montolowi fc 2-Z. L-Heracfla, 
HIM-Mantreal, Ate (15). Walker 03), Cor- 
dero (10). San Francisco, wiHiams (30). 

Satwrfa^a Line Scores 

AMERICA)! LEAGUE 
MtoMOOto 100 m MW 5 > 

Onsknl 303 OM Os-9 t • 

Guordodo, pHlte I4I.BWH) (7) and Vte- 
hock; Nagy and Psna. vy-Haav. 7-4 
L— Guardado, 0-1. HR— Oovokmd, Bello (M). 
OaMara MO MO M»-2 ■ 2 

Baton MO BSO B3s-1B 7 • 

VanPoopetTavtor ISt.Horsmon I7).5mHtv 
bws (8) and SMnbach. Harnona (7); Selo.BaI 
lay TO and RowtetL w— Sole. 7-4. L—van pop 


The Asucanl Press 

NILES, Ohio— Kim Williams, a golfer ou the LPGA Tour, 
was shot in the neck Saturday night as she approached a store 
and apparently was the victim of a drive-by shooting. 

Williams, 31, of Boca Raton, Florida, was compering in the 
LPGA Youngstown-Warren Classic at die nearby Avalon 
Lakes Golf Course. 

Police said early Sunday they had no suspects in the 
shooting. 

Police said Williams was shot about 9 P. M. while walking in 
the parking lot of the Phar-Mor discount store. She was taken 
from Warren General Hospital by helicopter to MetroHeaith 
Medical Center in Cleveland. 

Williams, who was listed in fair condition, was scheduled 
for tests before any decision was made on surgery. 

Jim Polznar. a social worker at the Geveland hospital said 
Williams was “conscious and talking” when she arrived. He 
said the bullet entered the left side of her neck and lodged in 
the upper right shoulder below the collar bone. 

Williams, in a statement delivered through Polznar, said 
she went to the store to buy some baby oil. which she uses as a 
rust preventative on her putter. 


nri.4-7. HRs— OrtHoml. 5Mnbodi (10). Boston. 
Vaughn Hi). BrooonsHv (4). Chamberlain (2). 
Seattle «0i i® OM— M W * 

ItowYarfc NO 3M 113— t 13 1 

Fleming, Davb (ft). Gcasagc TO and Hasel- 
mi Key, Pall (5). Caused (5) and Stanley. 
W—Ftomma^-la. L— Key.12-2. H Ra-Seattfe. 
BJawcro (5X. Hew York. SMUtos HI). 
MBwastec Mo Oto BOO-0 4 o 

Chicago M3 m 00*— 5 f 0 

EhtrodandSurMfl; AJ=wneraez ana La- 
Vainer«.W— AJHfnaretez. 7-7. L—E hired, )-&. 
HR— CMcooa. Dr Jackson (f). 

CaWonto an ooo mo— 1 4 i 

BaMmare MO DM N0-« 3 0 

Langtoan and Mvora, Dok a c ra ro (2); Mc- 
Donald and Toefcott. Tackett TO. W— Lana 
toon. 54. l— M cDonoki 
Toronto no oh oia—7 n : 

Kosnaiv wo mo to#— * 9 i 

AJjeftor, CatolDo (51. Hall TO and Knorr; 
Gordon. Nicacham «). Maanante 19) one 
Moctorlane w— Catolito.3-1. L-Meocnoro.fr 
L Sv— Hall (ft). HR—' Toronto, Spnxw (7). 
DetroO 410 OH WO— * 9 I 

Tm DM DM 010—1 7 C 

MoaroendKrcutcr; Pavlik. Ltary (2). Ba 
banart (7h Hawaii W and l.Rodrioue 
W— Moore. 6-7. L — Pavlik. 1-4. HR— Texes. 
Canseco TO). 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 
Montreal 021 Zio too— ie ii 1 

Saa Francisco «M an MO — 9 n i 

ICMKI, Scot) (7). Rolas (S), Wetiatand »l 
and Webster; Black, Burba (ft), MJocksoe 
(7). Gomez (9) and JeJteed. W-KX1IL n-1 
L— Burba 0-5- Sir— WetIWond (14). 

HRs— MonfreoL Alau (16). Cordero (11). WoO- 


Tke Associated Press 

HENLEY. England — The 
United States dominated the 
eights events Sunday on the fi- 
nal day at the Henley Royal 
Regatta, winning four gold 
medals, including the Grand 
Cup, the most prestigious event 
of the 155-year-old regatta. 

Only one trophy for eights 
eluded' the American contin- 
gent, a success rate never before 
achieved. Only in 1980, when 
Americans won six Henley 
events, haw they left the histor- 
ic regatta with a bigger haul of 
winners medals. 

Victory in the Grand was 
achieved with unexpected ease, 
with the uauoDal heavyweight 
eight, Charles River and San 
Diego, beating the French na- 


ucGrilL PagnoaH 19). W—M. Munoz 4-1 L—4Z 

Orix 

35 

30 

0 

JTO 

5*7 

Rodriguez. 2-1 Sv—B. Ruffin (121. HRs-Cotor- 

Lotte 

30 

35 

0 

462 

10", 

ada akMrte (21). SU— Lankford (171. 

Kintrtw 

29 

36 

1 

438 

12 

Chicago OM 001 «21— « 10 * 

Nlpoon Ham 

26 

41 

1 

390 

15% 


Houcton Bit no 021—5 I 3 

Bonks. Bauttno (7). Ptosac TO. Crtin (8) 
end WHUnv Kile, Hanattan iBI.Tajanm ibi. 
Hudrt (9), RrynctidS W and EuMMa Senate 
19). W— Reynolds. 6-3. L-Crlm. 3-2. 
HR— Houston. Bagwell (2ft). 

New York OM dm mi— i 4 i 

Saa West) 2» mo to*— 4 U 2 

jaeome, Union 17). ALMaddux 17} one 
Hundlev; Astitm and Ainimn. W— Atodiy. ftft. 
L— jDcome.frl.HR— New York. Bragna TO. 
PhBadfttela DM OH 630-3 11 0 

Lo* Angeles too OM M*— » u 0 

QoontillL Conor 15). Borland («) and Lie- 
berthal: Condtottl and CaMmandn. 

W— careflattl.ft-l L — Quant rill. 2-2. HR— Los 
Angetes. RRodrtawa (ft). 

The Michael Jordan Watch 

FRIDAY'S GAME: Jordon »ew Mw-2 as 
Memphis defe at ed Birmingham 5-0. He 
struck out In me third, walked In Hie ftttti ana 
fifed to led fn (he eighth. He also had two 
Miauls and one assist In riant field. 

SEASON TO DATE: Jordan Is S3-for-2ft* 
and Is batting .197. He has 12 doubles, one 
triple, to RBI. 29 walks, 73 strikeouts and 20 
state bases In Daftwnpts. Hr baa T27pu<aun. 
two assists and toatit errors m riant Held. 

Japanese Leagues 

Central Leooue 


ter (3), Loosing (4). Berry (61. San Francis- 


w 

L 

T 

pa. 

GB 

e% Putter win 13), Carrenn (2). 

Ywnlurl 

43 

24 

0 

MO 

— 

Atlanta 010 300 108-5 12 1 

Chunlchl 

34 

S 

0 

.515 

8% 

Florida MO OM 000—0 4 0 

Yakutt 

34 

32 

0 

J15 

8% 

GJUtoddux, Wohlers (SLMcMlchari (9) and 

Yakatiamo 

31 

35 

0 

470 

11% 

OTOrlen; Matncwt Mutts 15), Drotmon 16), 

Hiroshima 

26 

36 

0 

419 

14% 

RXrivteff) and SmttooaW— GJWoddux, 1H 

HonsMrt 

27 

TO 

0 

TOJ 

19 


L— Mamma, 1-1. HR— Atkmta, McGrltt (21). 
decuman 003 U> on— 5 19 a 

IWiBargb SID BW 00ft-2 9 1 

Honmn.Fortuona(7),Carraeca(B)andDor- 
raLTaubenn IB); Cooke, WiitedlDyir la;. 
Dewey TO and Parrish. W- -ik msu n. s-s. 
L— Cooke, 34. HR — Pittsburgh. D.Oart (7). 
Colorado OM 962 $00-7 13 0 

St LODll 301 Oil 000-5 11 1 

NJ«L MJVbnoz (ft), Hoimea (7), B.Ruffln (6) 
and Glneifl: Tewksbury. R.Radrlgiiec (7). M. 
Perez (7). Murphy to. Anxto (9) and T, 


i uk rta n Results 
Yomturt 15. Yakut) 4 
OiunlcW 8. Yokohama 2 
Hiroshima B. Htmtotm 2 

Sextan Results 
Yakut! 4. Yonmiri 3 
Yokohama *. Ownldil 3 
HonVtfn a. Hiroshima I 

Pacific Leaoae 
W L T 
sefiw to 24 a 

DaW 3* 29 0 


Pet. GB 

jas — 

5S4 4 VS 


Saturday's Results 
SeBxi 3. Kintetsu 2 
Orl* S. Daiel 4. 10 kmlnss 
LcRe Z Nippon Ham !. it Innings 
teodort Results 
Kimetsu 7. Settw 3 
Oofei Z 0 tie 1 
Nippon Ham A Lotte 2 


French Grand Prix 

Return S noday, 72 laas on the sjfrfcHame- 
ter a*«!-maej drcuU,30ftkllenMtare. (190.11 
miles) fnmMiigav Coon. France: I.MIcnael 
Scbumacner, Germany. Benetton Fort. ) itour. 
38 mtoutes, 35JM seconds, 1BL215 ksn 1115.74 
man); Z Damon HHI. Britain. Williams- Re- 
nault, Ho42 seconds behind; 1 Gertwra 
Berger. Austria, Ferrari, 0765: 4. He(ra-Har- 
afci Frentzch Germaiy. Saueertercedes. 71 
1005 co wiplewd; 5. Fler-LUlgi Mortlnl, Italy. 
NDnoroLFord. 70; ft. Andrea De Cnans. Italy. 
Souber-Meroeoes.70.- 7 . Jehnn)e Herbert, Brit- 
ain, LOus-MuBetvHonda, 7Q; A Christian Fim- 
oakS. Brazil. Foanuoric-Ford.70; 9, Jean-Marc 
Gounon, Froncr, 5ttnteK-Ford. 68; ID. Mark 
Bkudril. Britain Tyrrell-Yomaha, 67. 

Driver s landlaa s (eAer 7 races): 1. Sclw 
moctwr.ftft points.- Z Hill. 29: Z Barger. 17; 4, 
Jftan AiesL France. 13; 5. Rubens Barricnello. 
Brazil. 7; ft. (tie) Martin Brunette, Britain ana 
Nicola LarinL Italy, ft; A Frentzen. 5; 9. Hie) 
Blundell; Mika Hakkinen, Sweden; Ukvo Ka- 
favama. Japan; Karl wendilnger. Austria; 
De Cesar Is; Plertulcl Mvtlni. Italy. 4. 

Co uto t u c i ars Slaadlaas: 1 . Benetton, 67 
paints: Z Ferrari, 34; 3. W1 lltams 31 : A Jordan. 
1);5.tne) McLaren; Sout*r, ID; 7 . Tyrrell, S; 
&Minanfi.4; 9. Footwork, 3; ID. Lanraussft. I. 

Tour de France 

Baum Satuntar of ffie proteoe. a 7-tuh- 
meter (AfrmDe) leu from Lille to Eoralflle: 1, 
Chris Board man, Britain. CAN. 7 minutes. 49 
seconds; Z Miouet induram. Spain. Baneslo. 
15 seconds behind; x Tony Racnlnaer, Swit- 


tioual crew. Sport Nautique 
Compagnie et Socitte d'En- 
eouragemeni du Sport, by more 
than five lengths. 

It was the biggest winning 
margin in the Grand for 30 
years. 

“We set out to go fast the 
whole race.'' said U.S. coach 
Mike Spracklen, who had a tri- 
umphant return to his native 
England. “Bui i didn't expect to 
win by this much — about half 
that distance perhaps." 

There was further success Tor 
the North American comment 
when Canadian Marnie 
McBeaa. an Olympic gold med- 
alist in double sculls, easily beat 
Germany’s Kathrin Boron, an 
Olympic champion in eights 


zeriond, Mopftl. 19 seconds neWM; 4, Aie< 
Zuito. Switzerland. ONCE. 22; 5. Artnand De 
Las Cupvol France, Castaramo. 244; a, Thier- 
ry Marrie. France. Castaramo, 79; 7, Eddv 
Sclancur. France. GAN. 30; L Johan Mu- 
seeww. Befgfum. CB-mg. It; f.Cioudto CWop- 
puccL Italy. Carrera, 33; 10. Andrea Pwon. 
Haiv. Poll I, 34. 

Resutn at SuMaYs tint ctaae. 234 kltaaie- 
lerx (1*5 miles) from LHM to Armenttem: t. 
DlamalMne Aodouiaparrav. Uzbek Is fan, 
Pom, s hoars. 46 minutes. 1ft seconds; Z CHat 
Ludwig, Germany, Telekom, same time; X 
jetton Museeuw, Belgium. GB-mG, sJ.; 4.511- 
uloMari Inelkt. I tal y. Mer eatone. U.; 5. Anarel 
Tcftmlf. Russia. Lotto. 6. Jan Svorada. 
Slovakia. La more, sJ.j 7. Giovanni Fidonza. 
tkUv.sl.; B. Emmanuei Maanlen. France, sJ.; 
9, Miguel Induram. Spain. Bonesto. sj„- 10. 
Gloniuco Bartataml. Italy. ManeL s-t. 

Overall Stondlags: I. Boaraman.5 hours»f 
mtnutas. 5 seconds; 2. indurain. IS seconds 
behind; X Rom Inner, 19 seconds behind; 4. 
Zulle. 22; S, Muswuk 23; A De Los Dievos. 74; 
7. AadOUltMrov. 27: Z Marie. 29: 9. Setoneur. 
30; 10, Luawfa. XL 

IRISH OPEN 

knotty sunoav at tM L493 meter (7,143 
yard) par 72 coarse In KHkemry: 

Bernhard Langer, Germany 7(MA-70-47~27S 
Rooert Allenbv. Australia &8-ftfrftfr72-276 
John Doty. US. 7tWft- 73-65- Z74 

Jose Marla OlazsbaL Spain 6fr6fr 71 -71-278 
Greg Turner. New Zealand 73-7&ft9-ftft-278 
Peter Baker. England 7frftB-7l-7g-279 
Steven Rkrarasan. England 7i-70-tf-ft4-:n" 
Mike Harwood, Australia i/HIt-n-n-TBO 
Paul MOIanev, Australia 71 -7047-73 -2S0 

SECOND RUGBY UNION TEST 
France 23. New Zealand 20 

THIRD TEST 
Enstand vs. Mew Zealand 
Third Day, Saturday, in Manche ste r 
E polana first kvrlngs: 382 
New Zealand Drat Innings: 151 
New Zealand second innings: 205-5 (58 overs) 


and coxless pairs, in the wom- 
en's single sculls final. 

That put McBean atop the 
FISA World Cup points table. 
Swiss sculler Xeno Muller 
moved to the top of the men's 
table with his victory in the Di- 
amond Challenge Sculls. 

He beat Denmark's Martin 
Hansen by 1 V* lengths, to take 
the points lead from Vaclav 
Chalupa, the Czech who is the 
holder of the World Cup. 

Gabor Mitring and Zsolt 
Dani became the first Hungar- 
ians to win at Henley when they 
captured the Double Sculls. By 
contrast, England’s Steve Red- 
grave won his thirteenth Henley 
title in the Silver Goblets. 

Redgrave, who has won gold 
medals in coxless pairs in the 
last three Olympics, looked as 
good as ever at the age of 34. 
partnering fellow world and 
Olympic champion Matthew 
Pinseni to a 1 v 4 length victory 
over the Belgians Jaok Van 
Driessche and Luc Goiris. 

FINAL RESULTS 
Silver Goblets I Cox less Pairs) 
sieve Redgrave and Matthew PLffeefit, Brit- 
ain def. Joak van Driessche end Luc Goiris. 
Bettrium, one and fftree-4uarfer tengfns. sev- 
en minutes 22 seconds 

Diamond scuds 

Xeno Muller. Switzerland del . Man in Hansen. 
Denmark. 1-3/4. 7:35 

Bauble Salih 

Goran Mlirlng/Zsott Don I, Hungary deL Pe- 
ter Uhrig/Chrlsnan Handle. Germany. 21 /T. 
7:07 

Women's Stogies Stoll* 

Mamie McBean. Canada del. Kottirin Boron, 
Germany, easily, 8:35 

Grand Challenge Cup (Eights) 
Charles River /San Diego, U5. del. Soon Nou- 
Uoue/ComalegneSoclete do Encouragement 
du Sport. France, easily. 6:13 

Steward* Cun (Contes Faun) 
E.tLBouJougnr/Lrsn. France Del. London 
Rowing Club, Britain. 1-1/2. 6:44 
Princess Elizabeth cup (School Eights) 

St Pours School, Concorde, ui del. Atlantic 
City High School. U.S. 1-3/4. ft:U 

Ladles Challenge Plate (Elglifs) 
Colleae Boat Chib. U.S. del. London Rowing 
aub/NotilngiKonsnire Countv. 2-2/2. 6:23 
Thames Chottenge Cop (Eights) 
Brown University. U.5. def. Goldie Boat Clutv 
l-l/Z 4:30 

The Queen Mather Challenge Cup ( Quadrueie 

Auuerve.bm Treviri* Trier 'Bollberg. G-.r- 
many def. London Rowing aub. easily, 6:31 


Arts & Antiques 
Every Saturday 
Contort Fred Ronan 
Tei.- (33 1)46 37 93 91 
fax 133 1)46 37 93 70 
or your nearest HT office 
or representative 


NASDAQ NATIONAL MARKET 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY.4, 1994 


O N 


A Y 


d 


SPORTS 


Schumacher Wins No. 6, 
Mansell Fails to Finish 


The Associated Press 

MAGNY COURS, France 
—Michael Schumacher of Ger- 
many won the French Grand 
Prix on Sunday on a blistering 
day that saw many cars break 
down and Nigel Mansell's re- 
turn to Formula One aborted 
by a mechanical problem a little 
more than halfway through. 

Schumacher, in a Benetton- 
Ford, won for the sixth lime in 
seven races this season, easily 
beating Damon Hill of Britain 
in a Williams- Renault. More 
than 12 seconds separated the 
two at the end. 

Gerhard Berger of Austria, in 
a -Ferrari, took third. He was 52 
seconds back and was the only 
other driver on the same lap as 
Schumacher . 

Atr temperatures were above 
30 degrees centigrade (86 Fahr- 
enheit) on a sunny day in cen- 
tral France, with the heat on the 
track at more than 50 centf- 
grade (122 Fahrenheit). 

Only 11 of the 26 cars that 
started the race were still run- 
ning at the end of the 72 laps on 
the 4.25-kilometer (2.64-mile) 
circuit, a total distance of 306 
kilometers. 

Mansell, a Briton who won 
the first two races in Magny 
Cours in 1991 and 1992, 
dropped out after 46 laps as his 
Williams- Renault slowed to a 
stop on the circuit. 

The team said that he had a 
pump-drive failure. ManseLl 
went into the team pits and left 
the track immediately. 

Schumacher was in the sec- 
ond row behind Hill and Man- 
sell but got an excellent start, 
went between the two Williams- 
Renaults and had the lead by 
the first comer. 

*T caught the right moment 
to go. When the red disap- 
peared I was going," Schu- 
macher said. **I couldn't have 
done any better. I think Nigel 
had a little mistake, but my 
start was perfect." 

Hill stayed about a second 
behind Schumacher for 20 laps, 
then Schumacher turned up the 
speed and built an eight-second 
lead by the 26th lap. 

“It was a tough fight at the 
beginning. Damon did some 


good racing, but that’s what we 
all enjoy," Schumacher said. 

His lead was more than 1 1 
seconds at the midway point, 
before he pitted for tires to al- 
low HiB into first briefly. 

HUl pitted on the 45th lap, 
and Schumacher went back into 
first and built up a 29-second 
lead by the 50th lap. 


He was able to pit again and 
lose just 14 seconds of that lead 


before going on comfortably to 
the victory. 

"It was a disappointing last 
two-thirds of the race, but the 
battle continues," Hill said. 

The high temperatures took 
care of many cars, and two po- 
tential challengers look them- 
selves OUL 

On the 43rd lap, Jean Alesi 
went into a sand trap, Reubens 
BarricheDo hit him while he was 
tiying to go back on the track, 
and tiie fourth and fifth placers 
were suddenly out of the race, 
moving Mansell up from sixth 
to fourth briefly. 

Two laps later, Mansell was 
also out of the race. 

MansdJ was on loan Sunday 


for WiQiams-Renauli from the 
Newman-Haas IndyCar team. 
He won the IndyCar title in 
1993 after takingthe Formula 
One crown in 1992, 

The last time Mansell raced 
at Magny Cours. he set a race 
lap record that still stands, of 
1:17.07, an average of 198-52 
kilometers per hour. His quali- 
fying mark is 1:13.864. 

In 1986-92, Mansell won four 
of the seven French Grands 
Prix, including the first two at 
Magny Cours. Before that he 
won at Le Caste [let. 

Mansell is currently fifth in 
the IndyCar standings and 
doesn't have any victories this 
year, after five last season. 

Schumacher added to his 
lead in the Formula One driv- 
ers’ standings with the victory. 
He now has 66 points, with Hill 
second and Berger moving into 
third. 

The next race is the British 
Grand Prix on Sunday in S2- 
verstoae, England, where Man- 
sell’s place will be taken by Da- 
vid Coulthard of Scotland. 






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Several riders fell after Wilfiried Nelissen of Belgium ran into a 


First Stage of Tour Ends in Chaos, Thanks to Camera- 


man 


By Samuel Abt 

International Herald Tribune 

ARMENTIERES, France — 
Six uneventful hours in the 
Tour de France ended in chaos 
in the last 20 seconds of Sun- 
day’s first stage when a police- 
man standing on the course 
caused a crash that left four 
riders sprawled and bloody on 
the ground 

Three were hospitalized and 
two were so badly injured that 
they are out of the race. The 
policeman, who was not imme- 
diately identified also was hos- 
pitalized but not seriously in- 
jured 

Tour officials reported that 
the policeman was taking a 
photograph as the leading 
sprinters tore for the finish line 
150 meters away. He was just 
far enough away from the barri- 
cade that bolds back the crowd 
to be directly in the path of 


Wilfried Nelissen, a Belgian 
rider for the Novemail team. 

Moving about 70 kilometers 
an hour (43 mph), Nelissen 
plowed into the gendarme and 
they both felL Right behind the 
Belgian and falling over him 
were Laurent Jalabert. a French- 
man with ONCE; Fabiano Fon- 
lanelli. an Italian with ZG Mo- 
bil i, and Alexander 
Gon tchenko v, a Ukr ainian with 
Lampre. 

Jalabert was the most badly 
injured. For many minutes after 
tHe crash, he sat on the road 
with his face covered in blood 
from what doctors said were 
broken teeth and fractured 
cheekbones. His collarbone 
also may be broken. 

Nelissen has a concussion 
and face and knee injuries. He 
and Jalabert, two of the leading 
sprinters in the sport, will not 
start the second stage. Fontan- 
elli, who has facial injuries, was 


expected to be released from 
the hospital in time to continue 
the Tour. 

Riding just to Nelissen’s left 
in the sprint was Djamolidine 

Abdoujaparov, the Uzbek 
sprinter whose go-for-it style 
has caused crashes before. This 
time, though, the Tashkent Ter- 
ror was blameless and, better, 
the winner of the stage. 

The rider for the Paid team 
was timed in 5:46: Id for the 234- 
kdometer (145-mile) slog from 
Euralille, a district in Lille, to 
Armen tides, a small dty in 
northern France. Second among 
the survivors of the sprint was 
Olaf Ludwig, a German whhTe- 
lekom, and third was Johan Mu- 
seeuw, a native of Belgium who 
rides for the GB-MG team 

Chris Board man, the En- 
glishman in the yellow jersey 
after his dynamic victory in the 
prologue Saturday, finished 
29th. Given the same time as 


Abdoujaparov, Boardman re- 
tained the overall lead by 15 
seconds over Miguel Indurain 
and 19 seconds over Tony Ro- 
mmg er in the 189-man field 
that started this first of 2 1 daily 
stages in the 81st Tour. 

Boardman easily won the 
short prologue to the Tour, fin- 
ishing 15 seconds ahead of In- 
durain. Riding in hot and heavy 
weather through central Lille 
before a large crowd. Board- 
man was docked in 55.15 kilo- 
meters an hour. 

He caught the man who left a 
minute ahead of him. the hu- 
miliated Luc Leblanc, a 
Frenchman with the Festina 
team. Third in the pack was 
Rominger, a Swiss with the Ma- 
pa-Clas team, 19 seconds be- 
hind Boardman. 

AD three leaders were cele- 
brating their performances 
Sunday. Boardman, of course, 
needed no excuse for his happi- 


ness. Indurain was said by his 
Banesto team officials to have 
proven that he has the form to. 
win a fourth consecutive Tour 
and Rominger vas reported by 
his, team officials to oe ecstatic 
that he cut by 10 seconds Indur- 
am’s margin ewer him in last 
year’s prdOgneL . . 

This was the second consecu- 
tive year in which the first stage 
ended in a crash. Last year Ab- 
doig'aparov was die villain in 
the splint but nobody was bad- 
ly hurt In-1 991, he crashed solo 
on the final stage in Paris, hit-, 
ting the sted barricades that 
lin e the Champ s-Elysfes as he 
sprinted toward the line. 

On the narrow roads that the 
Tour usually uses, crashes are 
not uncommon. There was an 
early and uneventful pile-up 
Sunday, for example, affecting 
about a dozen riders. All of 
them got quickly back on their 
bicycles and continued to pedal 


through a monotonous land- 
scape of two-story brick houses 
with red tile roofs, uncountable 
caf6s advertising beer, an occa- 
sional .field of wheal or corn 
and massive numbers of specta- 
tors out to welcome the start .of 
the Tour. 

Crashes are most frequent in 
the early going, when the riders 
are still nervous and frisky, be- 
fore the heat and die wear and 
tear df three weeks of racing 
leave them more willing- to 
grant right of way to a rival 
'• But tms is rarely true in the 
sprint fortius finish line; an ex- 
ercise bursting with machismo, 
where to yield is to lose face. 
Bat to have one of the many 
policemen who line the course ; 
involved is most rare. 

Tour officials defended die 
need to have policemen on the 
final straightaway but said that 
their number might be reduced^ 

It was an ugly end to a stage 


that Boardman.’ s Gan team- 
mates kept easily under control. 
They were assisted by the heat 
(low 80s), an intermittent head- 
wind, the length of the run and 
the near certainty that the fiat 
terrain would lead to a sprint 

finish 

. The only attack of the day 
started with just 64 kilometers 
left and got nowhere other than 
the outskirts of Annentiftres, 
which is celebrated mainly as 
the home, in the World War I 
song, of The Mademoiselle 
from Annenteers” — bulky, 
dinky, parley voq, if anybody 
still feels like singing. 


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S. N D A Y 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JULY 4, 1994 


Page IS 


% 




Too Good’ Sampras Scorches Ivanisevic for Wimbledon Tide 


Martinez Thwarts 

NmratUmi’sBid 

Wvshbixtori Pan Serna 

^5,MBLEDON, England — There 
wouM .be no lm wSibiedon wS 

champKinship for Martina Navraaimi^M 

last rand hutiah at Centra CoiS^S 

Navratilova and her legion of fans had 
teamed of her winning this most presti- 

mVISMlpin 


left theejd place' 

honorably and dedsiveiy, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 
‘When you write a script, you can make 
11 - l ? y M« luch ^ you want,” Navratilova 
said. If you warn reality, you can’t affect 
inaL 

"But no regrets," she added. To sad I 
thdn t win, but very proud about getting 
this far and having the opportunity. That’s 
all 1 asked for,- and I got it. It didn’t quite 
come through, but that's life.” 

Said Martinez, “I’m really sorry to beat 
her, but Tm really pleased that I did." 

Martinez served superbly, returned 
serve splendidly and matte huge shots on 
jgaany of the biggest points. She also had 28 
passing shot winners with Navratilova, as 
usual, at the net; Navratilova manage 
only two passing winners. 

As a little girl growing up in the north- 
ern Spanish town of Monzon, Martinez 
learned to play tennis against the wall of 
the factory where her father worked. She 
called that wall “Martina” and has said 
many times that her 37-year-old foe in the 
final has been her tennis idol for years. 
Now, children all around Spain may 



Funk LmhifdtMsnw Ftaan-Ptau 


more sated to day than to grass. Then 53 
minutes into the match, midway through 
the second set, she had to summon a train- 
er to treat her on the sidelines for what she 
later said was tightness in her lower bade. 
She described the pain as being ‘ in her 
“ban,” later amended to a strained hip 
muscle. 

“I wats thinking “She's fine,’ ” Navrati- 


begin hitting their shots against walls 
named Conchita, for she became the first 
Spanish woman to win a singles champion- 
ship at Wimbledon. Her first Grand 
triumph followed another Sp anish con- 
quest at the French Open last month, when 
Arantxa SAnchez Vicario won the women’s 
singles title and Sergj -Bruguera captured 
his second straight championship there. 

Mart the third seed and third- 
ranked M»a ycr in (he world, started as a 33- 
I shot here because her baseline game is far 

Other Wimbledon Results 

MEN* DOUBLES FINAL 

Toad WoodbrWoe and Atark Woodford* {$>, AaohaHa,d*L 
Grant ConneJL Canada, and Patrick Galbraitli (2). UJ&.7-I (7- 
1I.M.M. 

WOMEN* DOUBLES FINAL 
Gkri Fernande z. U &. aw Natalia Zvenrva [11, BdamdcL 
lana Novotna Czech ReoUjttoandAnortbwSanctw* Vicario (2), 
Spain. M.A-L 

MIXED DOUBLES ' ' 

SmtMinN 

T J. MKkttetan and uwl MeNeU, UX dec Byron Black, 
ij mbobwp, ond Pom Sbrtvec nh V*. AX 7-6 I1M); Todd 
■M/oodhrkkJC. Austral la,a«vl Helena Suknva <«, Crecti Renub- 
'ta.ont Grant ConnwL Canada ond Llndmr Davenport (•}, - 

US. ILK _ 

Woo<tortdBc«ita5utowodBiftMddtotatrttad M cHo a rM.7-&43. 


Bat not right away. Navratilova was 
holding a 3-0 lead in that second set after 
breaking Martinez’s serve with a brilliant 
b a c kh and rally in the first-game. Then she 
did it again, m the third with a lunging 
backhand volley that just slipped across 
the net for a winner. 

Navratilova won the set to the great joy 
of most of the 13,000 in the crowd when 
Martinez, facing break point in the ninth 
game, tried to rip a backhand topspin 
passing shot but found the middle of the 
net 

StiD, that shot — hit with huge velocity 
from just behind the baseline and occa- 
sionally cross-court — did not fail Marti- 
nez often on this muggy afternoon of high 
drama. 

“She never passed me better off the 
backhand then she did today,” Navrati- 
lova-said. “She passed me as well as any- 
one ever has, even Monica Seles. 

“Conchita has a lot of dip on the ball, so 
it comes over lower by the time it gets to 
you, .which makes it more difficult to vol- 
‘ ley well. And she stands back further be- 
hind the baseline for the return of serve, 
which gives her extra time to line up her 
shots.” 

In the third set, Martinez used that 
wicked shot — and two nervous double 
faults by Navratilova — to seize control. 

Navratilova saved three break points on 
the opening game of th e deciding set, only 
to doable faint and lose it Navratilova got 
the break back in the fourth gone with a 
forehand passing shot as Martinez made 
.one of her rare rushes to the net Navrati- 
iovapunqyedherfisi in ecstasy and short i.- 
ed “YessssT as the shot hit cleanly down 




the line, but it would be her last major 
celebration of the day. 

Martinez got the fifth game to deuce 
with a running topspin lob over Navratilo- 
va’s bead, converted a weak volley into an 
easy backhand putaway for the advantage 
and won the game for a 3-2 lead whoa 
Navratilova double-faulted again. 

Martinez did not waste the opportunity, 
holding serve for a 4-2 lead, then doing it 
again in the eighth game, despite Navrati- 
lova’s valiant effort to get luck into the 
match. 

Navratilova actually had two break 
points at 15-40 in that game. But Martinez 
saved one with the killer topspin backhand 
from the baseline, then another wheat Nav- 
ratilova hit a backhand volley deep as she 
rushed to the net. 

For emphasis, she broke Navratilova 
one last time for the set, the match and the 
championship with a low, sliced backhand 
that Navratilova hit batik down the line 
and out, never even dose to staying in. - 
— LEONARD SHAPIRO 


Goran Ivanisevic reached for a 
shot, above, in losing; Pete 
Sampras had a ffing in winning. 

On Saturday, Conchita Mar- 
tinez and the defeated Martina 
Navratilova embraced. 





Aces Up 7-6 ( 7 - 2 ), 7-6 ( 7 - 5 ), 6-0 (Tins 


iyue NicbnL'Tbc , 


By Leonard Shapiro 

Washington Pott Strive 

WIMBLEDON, England — It was 
boom-boom, bombs- away tennis on the 
lawn at Wimbledon Sunday, High Noon at 
2 in the afternoon, as Fete Sampras and 
Goran Ivanisevic stared down the barrels 
of each other's smoking strings. 

When all was said and gunned on anoth- 
er sun-drenched summer day. Sampras 
was standing tall, and once again in famil- 
iar territory, with the championship trophy 
for the men's single title lofted high above 
his head for the second straight year, and a 
5535,000 check on the way to the bank. 

N ever mind that the American’s perfect- 
ly executed 7-6 (7-2), 7-6 (7-5), 6-0 mastery 
of his Croatian foe was not exactly greeted 
with wild enthusiasm by a crowd that 
oooohed and aaaahed at all the aces from 
both men but spent most of the day offer- 
ing polite applause for a match with a 
longest rally of six shots. In a 49-minute 
first set, the BBC reported a total of five 
minmes’ total action. 

But Sampras, the world's top-ranked 
player, was making no excuses for winning 
a match the only way be knew bow: with 
17 aces and a total of 54 unretumed serves, 
with brilliant ba ckhand p assin g shots re- 
turning serves from behind the baseline, 
with pinpoint volleying and with the abili- 
ty to raise the level of his play on the big 
points. Almost every one of them, in facL 

"I couldn’t play any better than I did 
today,” said Sampras, who withstood 25 
aces and a total of 44 unreiuroable serves 
from his left-handed opponent. “I'm feel- 
ing pretty stoked right now." 

Ivanisevic, who lost here in the finals to 
Andre Agassi in 1992. was feeling mostly 
empty. Nine times after the match, he used 
the term “too good” to describe Sampras's 
performance. “He played unbelievable.” 
he said. 

Sampras, 22. is the first repeat champion 
since Boris Becker in 1985-86 and only the 
third American to win back-to-back Wim- 
bledon titles since 1938. He needed only an 
hour and 55 minutes to do it, four minutes 
less than Conchita Martinez bad taken to 
win the women's title Saturday over Mar- 
tina Navratilova. 

But what a difference a day makes. The 
women's final was far more entertaining 
than this deadly duel on the grass. Diana, 
the Princess of Wales, came to watch again 
but left the royal box at the end of the 
second set- By the time she got back to her 
seat, the match had ended. 

What she missed in that final set was 
Sampras at his best and Ivanisevic admit- 
tedly down on himself after playing some 
sloppy points to lose tiebreakers. 

“when you lose two sets 7-6, you don't 
feel so great,” Ivanisevic said. “And then 
you know that the guy is playing very good 
and you have to hit allyour first serves in, 
hit all good volleys. That is not easy to 


keep at that level. Then you crack a little 
biL” 

In the first two sets, Ivanisevic had only 
two break points on Sampras's serve. In 
the 11 th game of the first set he was up, 30- 
40, but Sampras got to deuce with a big 
first serve and a deep return by Ivanisevic. 
There were three more deuce games, the 
last when Sampras broke a string on his 
racket serving and missed an easy volley at 
the net. 

Ivanisevic's only other chance to break 
came in the fourth game of the second set. 
Once again, Sampras was all over the next 
three points. He got to deuce with a big 
serve and an unhittable volley, took the 
advantage with a backhand cross-conn 
passing shot and won the game with a huge 
first serve Ivanisevic could barely touch, 
let alone return. 

That’s exactly how Sampras played in 
the two tiebreakers. Sampras broke him on 
the sixth point of the first-set tiebreaker 
when Ivanisevic missed a backhand deep, 
then took a 5-2 lead when Ivanisevic hit a 
volley deep off Sampras's blistering return 
of serve. 

In the second set tiebreaker, Sampras 
had a 6-5 lead with Ivanisevic on the first 
of his two serves. The Croatian hit a strong 
first serve that Sampras just managed to 
block across the net. Ivanisevic volleyed 
weakly, allowing Sampras another return, 
high and seemingly in his foe's wheel- 
house. But Ivanisevic, racing another easy 
putaway, instead found the middle of the 
net to lose the second set. 

Sampras was on his knees and exulting 
at that point, for he knew his opponent was 
tiring in the 85-degree (29.4 degrees centi- 
grade) heat and had to be demoralized. 
Sampras said he had felt the same way 
himself when he lost to bunches of aces by 
Ivanisevic in their Wimbledon semifinal 
rwo years ago. This time. Sampras said, he 
told hims elf not to get upset if aces kept 
whizzing by because “no one can keep that 
up for five sets.” 

Sensing the kill, Sampras pounced ex- 
actly the way the winner of five Grand 
Slam events is supposed to. He took a (MO 
lead on Ivanisevic's first serving game of 
the third set and broke him with a grooved 
forehand passing shot after an exchange of 
volleys at the net Sampras was never 
threatened thereafter, and when Ivanisevic 
volleyed one last shot wide on his own 
serve, Sampras threw his racket into the 
crowd to celebrate the victory. 

It was a rare show of emotion from the 
clean-cut kid from California, as was his 
stripping off his shirt Andre Agassi-sryle. 

“I think I’m winning their hearts.” Sam- 
pras said. “1 just hope people can appreci- 
ate how t go about my tennis and how I 
play. . . . You can write what you wans, you 
can say what you want, but the fact is I've 
got two in a row, and that’s something 
that’s going to stay with me for as long as 
we’re all living.” 


A’s 



The Associated Proa 

Bobby Witt threw his third 
straight shutout, holding Uhe 
Red Sox tc< six hits as the Oak- 
land Athletics beat Boston. 10-0, 
at Fenway Park on Sunday. 

Witt extended his scoreless 
innings streak to 27. His previ- 
ous outings were a one-hitter 
against Kansas City on June 23 

AL ROUNDUP 

and a two-hitter against Cali- 
fornia on June 28. 

In his eighth career shutout. 
Will struggled in the middle in- 
nings. He allowed two angles in 
the fourth, needed a hases-lood- 
ed double play in the fifth and 
struck out Tom Brunansky to 
end the sixth with runners at 
first and third. 

All told, Witt struck out sev- 
en and walked four. In his last 
three games, he has struck out 
26 and walked six while lower- 
fag his earned-run average to 
4.69 from 6.15. 

Six players batted in runs for 
the A’s, who scored five runs in 
the fifth. Oakland has won 17 of 
the past 22. 

Yankees 5, Mariners 2: Paul 
O'Neill's three-run homer 


capped a five-run sixth inning 
that carried New .York to vic- 
tory at home over Seattle, snap- 
ping, the ' Yankees’ three-game 
losing streak. 

Mdido Perez was locked in a 
pitching dud with John Cum- - 
nrings untfl the Mariners scored 
the game's first run on Luis So- 
lo's RBI single in (he sixth.* 

■ In Saturday's games:' 

Mariners 12, Yankees 6: 
Keith MitcheU’s two-run single 
ignited an eight-run fifth farpng 
as Seattle snapped! Jimmy Key's 
11-game winning streak with a 
victory over New Yodt at Yan- 
kee Stadium. 

Key, who had not lost since: 
April 9, allowed 10 hits and six; 
runs before departing Saturday 
without retiring a Mariner in 
the fifth. Ken Griffey Jr. went 
5-for~6 with five singles. It was 
the second five-hit game of his 
career. 

Indians 9, Twins 1: Charles 
Nagy pitched a five-hitter for 
Cleveland’s third straight com- 
plete game and Albert Belle ho- 
mered again as the Indians beat 
Minnesota. 

Belle has homered in six of 
the last eight games and has hit 
safely in 18 of the last 19. His 


24th home run, a two-run shot 
off Eddie Guardado in the first, 
put Cleveland ahead to stay. 

Red Sox 10, Addetics 2: Tom 
Brunansky hit his seventh ca- 
reer grand slam and Mo 
Vaughn hit his 21st homer as 
the Red Sox ended Oakland’s 
eight-game winning streak. 

Bnmansky hit BiHy Taylor's 
first pi Ida over the Fenway 
Park’s Green Monster with tw 
out in the fifth to break open the 
game. It was his fourth homer 
this season, all coming since he 
was traded back to Boston by 
Milwaukee on June 19. 

Angels lj Orioles 0: Mark 
Langston pitched a three-hitter 
for his first shutout in two 
years, retiring the last 16 batters 
he faced, and Tim Salmon sin- 
gled in the game's only run. 

The outcome was a marked 
contrast to Friday night's 
match in Baltimore between the 
two teams, when the Orioles 
beat the Angela 14-7 in a game 
thatfeatured 1 1 homers, tying a 
major league record. 

Langston (5-4) walked one 
and struck out five in recording 
his first shutout since beating 
Texas on June 17, 1992. 

White Sox 5, Brewers 0: Alex 


Fernandez pitched a four-hitter 
and Danin Jackson drove in 
three runs for the home team. 

Fernandez matched a career 
high with 10 strikeouts and 
didn't yield a walk. In one 
stretch, he struck out seven of 
nine Milwaukee batters. 

Blue Jays 7, Royals 6: Ed 
Sprague’s sacrifice fly in the top 
at the eighth ended reliever 
Rusty Meacham’s dub-record 
streak of 22 Vj scoreless innings 
and gave Toronto the victory 
over Kansas City. 

Sprague's fly ball to left drove 
in John Olerud after Olerud and 
Mike Huff had angled with one 
out, enabling the Blue Jays to 
overcome 10 walks by their 
pitchers and three errors. 

Tigers 6, Bangers 1: Mike 
Moore rebounded from the 
shortest outing of his major- 
league career with a seven-hitter 
as Detroit beat Texas before 
46,668 people, the largest crowd 
in the Rangers' history. 

Moore, who lasted only one- 
third of an inning in a 10-5 loss 
to Oakland on June 26, shut 
down a Rangers lineup that had 
banged out 18 runs and 23 hits 
in a doubleheader sweep of the 
Tigers on Friday night- 


Reds Again Find Pirates Perfect Hosts 


The Associated Press 

Tony Fernandez continued to 
tormem Pittsburgh pitching, hit- 
ting a two-run homer and a dou- 
ble to finish off a .611 weekend 
as the visiting Cincinnati Reds 
beat the Pirates, 4-3. on Sunday. 

Jeff Branson added a go- 
ahead solo homer off Jon 

NL ROUNDUP 

Lieber in the sixth inning as the 
Reds took three of four m die 
series to drop 1^$** 
games back in the National 
League Central Division. 

The division-leading Rare, 
now 6-2 against 
have won four of five and are 14 
games over .500 for the first 
time this season. 

Rockies 5, Sf. Louis 2: Walt 
Weiss and Mike Kingery both 
doubled home ntns in the eighth 
inning to lead Colorado to vic- 
tory over St. Louis at home. 

With the score tied 2-2, Nel- 
son Liriano singled off reliever 
Rene Aroeha and scored on 
Weiss’ double to right- Kingery 
brought in Weiss with his dou- 


ble and scored an Dante Bi- 
chette’s single to make it 5-2. 

Astras 12, CiAs te Craig Big- 
gjo had four hits, including a 
homer and two doubles, and 
Greg Swindell broke a five- 
game losing screak as Houston, 
playing at home, beat Chicago. 

Ken Csjmniti hit two hornets 
— one an inside-the-park, 
three-run shot — and rookie 
Janies Mouton also homered 
for Houston, which has won 
four of its last five. 

Swindell gave up five hits and 
three runs in seven innings to 
get his first win since May 26. 

min Saturday's games: 

Reds 8» Pirates 2 j Reggie 
Sanders and Tony Fernandez 
each got four hits in CincmnatTs 
victory over Pittsburgh at home. 

Sanders was 4-for-4, Fernan- 
dez went 4-for-5, and Jacob 
Brumfield had three hits includ- 
ing a triple that started a three- 
run third inning. Fernandez has 
bit .545 (l2-for-22) as Cincin- 
nati has won four of six from 
Pittsburgh- 

Expos 16, Giants 9: Montreal 
hit five homers, including 
Lenny Webster's three-run shot 


in the seventh inning Saturday, 
to beat San Francisco. 

Wil Cordero, Mike Lansing, 
Sean Berry and MoTses Alou 
also homered for the Expos to 
help Ken Hill become the Na- 
tional League’s first 12-game 
winner. The Expos have to 10 
homers in the first three games 
of the four-game series in San 
Francisco. 

Braves 5, Marlins <fc Greg 
Maddux pitched seven shutout 
innings and Fred McGriff ho- 
mered and drove in two runs, 
lifting Atlanta to victory over 
Florida in Miami. 

Maddux, who had lost his pre- 
vious two decisions, scattered 
four hits. He threw only 85 
pitches and allowed only one 
runner to reach third base — 
Gary Sheffield in the first. 

Rockies 7, Cardinals 5: 
Pinch-hitter Dante Bichette bit 
a three-run homer and Andres 
Galarraga singled in the go- 
ahead run in Colorado’s five- 
run seventh inning, giving the 
Rockies a victory in St Louis. 

The loss stopped the Cardi- 
nals' winning streak at five and 


snapped the Rockies' four- 
game losing streak. 

Astros 5, Cubs 4: Craig Big- 

g o's single drove in Andy Stan- 
ewicz in the bottom of the 
ninth inning, giving Houston its 
victory over Chicago. 

Stanki ewicz led off the ninth 
with a walk and moved to third 
one out later on a single by 
Brian Hunter, who was caught 
in a rundown and lagged out on 
the play. Biggio followed with 
his game-winning Mi off Chuck 
Crim. 

Padres 4, Mels 1: Andy 
Ashby pitched a four-hitter and 
Tony Gwynn went 3-for-4 with 
three RBIs as San Diego defeat- 
ed visiting New York. 

Ashby, who tied a career high 
with nme strikeouts, lowered 
Ms ERA to 2.82, third-best in 
the National league. 

Dodgers 9, Phases 3: Henry 
Rodriguez homered and had a 
career-high five RBIs as Los 
Angeles beat Philadelphia in 
Dodger Stadium. 

Tom Candiotti pitched his 
fifth complete game, allowing 
10 hits and two walks while 
striking out seven. 


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International 
Herald Tribune 
ads work 












V 

/ 





O N D A Y 


SPORTS 




Germany Gets a Lift From Vdller — and, Says 


By Ian Thomsen 

International Herald Tribune 

CHICAGO — The German players are 
aged and vulnerable, beat up and tired, 
and Rudi Volieris the eldest of the elderly. 
Two years ago he retired from internation- 
al competition, but no one could replace 
him. As recently as last week. South Korea 
nearly made up three goals against his 
German team. 

So when the second, knockout round of 
the World Cup finals began on Saturday, 
Vfiller was returned to the starting team, 
like a king returned from exile. He is 34, 
with just 29 minutes of international expe- 
rience since 1992. For thefiret half, he was 
better than the best memories of him. It 
was Germany 3, Belgium 1 at the intermis- 
sion, with Vdller scoring twice and setting 
up the third goal for JQrj*en Klinsmann. 

Yet the German reaction was mere re- 
lief. Everything they do now is a short- 
term fix. They won by only 3-2, and this 
after Belgium had been robbed of a penal- 
ty. Though Vdller is bade, concern has 


shifted to Lothar Matthflus’s refusal of a 
second p ain-killing injection at half time 
for the ankl e hurt Monday against Korea. 

The Ge rman captain needed an injec- 
tion to play the first half, but the pain 
returned in just 35 minutes. Matthaus is 33 
years old, and even with a week's rest — 
Germany wfll meet the winner of Mexico- 
Bulgaria in a New Jersey quarterfinal Sun- 
day — his ankle isn’t likely to improve as 
the competition grows more ruthless. 
Teammates been wanting him to as- 
sume more responsibility offensively. In- 
stead he was replaced at sweeper by An- 
dreas Brehme, a defender who is himself 33 
and called out of retirement 

This team includes nine holdovers from 
the West German champion of 1990, and 
Saturday none was more striking than 
Vdller. In the sixth minute, he headed 
down a long ball from Matthaus and 
chipped it over the sliding Michel Freud- 
’homme, the tournament's hottest goal- 
keeper, with just one goal allowed in the 
first round. 


Everyone had expected a defensive 
game between Preutfhornme and the do-' 
fenave, insecure Germans. Instead, the 
60,246 at Soldier Field saw three goals in 
the rim II minutes. It was a cod, rainy 
day, feeding the optimism of the strikers. 
The Germans were so disappointed in 
themselves that they greeted Vdller like a 
savior, and surely Klinsmann was happy 
not to be alone up front 

For its part, Belgium had no choice but 
to seek the equalizer. It came within two 
minutes, on Enzo Stifo’s cross into the box 
that clanged from VOfler and Guido Buch- 
wald to the foot of Georges Grim, who 
clobbered it in. 

Right bade came V Oiler and Klinsmann, 
and it was like a Harlem Globetrotters 
drift. Vdller dribbled beyond reach, but 
Klinsmann back-heeled the ball back to 
him; and when Vdller was taken.' off the 
baft, Klinsmann came out of nowhere to 
blast it low across the box, bowling over 
the two water bottles PremFhomme stores 
against the left side of his net 


The Belgians had their chances to get 
. back intoiL Between Scifo and Josip We- 
ber, they certainly didn’t lack the talent, 
hut on dayy like tW s 7M> t eam ean match the 
Germans for energy — even when it’s 
coming from a bunch of retirees in the 
world's most exhausting sport: Volleris 
1 the# 



second goal, which tamed the game, was 
beaded from Thomas Hasher's comer in 
the 40th minute — VolDer slammed it into' 
the ground like a tennis overhead, and the 

ball deflected through PreudTxsniiie’s out- 
stretchedarms. 

“Vdller had aim of time to rest” Praid- 
"homme said. “It was his Erst game, and he 
was explosive/ 1 

Belgium had a complaint when Weber, 
sent ahead by Frariky Van der- Elst, was 
tackled from behind by Thomas Hehner 
with only the goalkeeper to beat. The Swiss 
referee, Kurt RoethEsberg, wavedplay on' 
as f bur angry Belgians chased him and the 
impartial crowd booed — -the crowd, of 
course, demanding a closer- match. ' 

Whether it should have been called, by 


FIFA's new rides, a red-card fool or a 
yellow-card mfraption byHdmer, it would 
nave meant the janra thing — his automat- 
ic expulsion, since 1 be -already had . been 
booked in the,13th inmate; ajnan ad van- 
tage for Bdgmin and the penalty shot that 
would have bronght Belgi um within a goal 
with 20 minutes renaming. 

Hie Belgian fede ration promised to 
write a mean fetterto FIFA, winch; spent 
the first round enforcing the rule against 
tackling from behmd only tosce it ignored 
in theoDemns same of tb&kaockout round. 


^andaa Stodc, head of the federa- 
tion, accused RorthKsbeig of wanting to 
hdpg^tGermany beat tiny Belgium. 

4i Thcrc is a referee for the big-associa- 
tions* and-thens is one of the anas associa- 
tions,*' Vanden Stock said.- .“When, in 


doubt, it always goes one way.” 

. “I do befieite su&'a cfeoaon is a scan- 


dal,"- .said the Belgium coach, Paul van 
HimsL “I don’t know wbaf s going through, 
the head of the retinae, but lean toft you 
thatif I was in charge^ sudi a referee would 


be sent home immecnareay auwwvnuu not _ ; r 

ref eree again.” / 

Bdgium scored in the 90th mumie as (jF* 
pfaflippe Albert oOTVWtodu w^ pass from!. r 
,Van Der Elat, then spent iigury timedes- 
peratdy striving to inalce it 3-3 an d forc e " - " 
overtime — even bringing Preud’homme ■ 
up for a comer. * .- * 

Still even if the referee had called it . v-.- 
<fifltontly, the result might not have , / .. • 

changed: Klinsm a nn esplo dcd J S^pum’s r v* ; 

wide-open half for a haff-maen chances . 

"and was unlucky not to succeed on any of 
thenu _ * 

“It’s no secret that JOrgen and I have ” 

known each other a long time/played a lot. . 
of games together, and we know how the ■ 

other is moving,” YaUer said. • 

Ultimately, the Germans reaoed to; 
able efimniation by playing' their 

»yinteii of the. tournament If Rrazfloc, 

Gennany in upgradmgitself for the second 
round, the US. team win have no chance . 

Monday. 



Sunup Lyoo'Tbe Anoducd Prb 

Thomas Hdmer and Andreas Brehme of Germany catting off Josip Weber of Belgium and, right, Jurgen Klins mann celebrating after scoring the second goal 


in Germany's victory Saturday in Chicago. 



'Thousands’ 


IV; 


j- 





by Our Staff From DUpadsa 

LOSANGELES — Diego Maradona, 
mntfrtning to deny he had. taken perfor- 
mance-enhancing drugs, flew here Sun- 
day ta watch the Argentine team from 
which he has been banned play its match 

a gains r Romania. 

(fifln*t take drugs,” he told Italian 
State tderirioo. earlier m Merrimack, New 
ffamj«hng T didn 't do what 
acpnsmg me Of. But they win not 


are 

me. 


that led to. his. sus- 
pension' by the Argentine federation, 
takes. June 25^ after a 2-1 victory over 

rbntafneri fiviE variations of 

ephedrme, according to FIFA, soccer’s 
governing body. Epncdrinc isused as a 


decd^tant and an asthma medi- 
cine, asdsome of its derivatives are used 
in diet pftb. But some forms of the drug 
also are powerful stimulants. 


- foahinSttviiw the Argentine daily 
Ghomr published Saturday, Maradona 
ssid, “I took;.timjuat as .anyone would 
tid^e^an ^spq^n. There aretnousands of 
ft.” - -• 


the 
.Gran 
tiiat 


federgriori's president, Julio 
theTELAM 


tttid.i 


newsagen- 
t's personal dietician, 
had “prepared a puree of 
j-*gfflg-th« ended in this disaster.** : = 

Maradona told darin that -’t^anid 
l an£ I madea mistoke, there’s no doubt" 


The Dallas Morning News reported 
that the president of FIFA, Jo&o Haver 


lange^stiked the Argentine association to 
suspend Maradona, hut that he “will do 
evvsything possible to avoid a situation 
that vritt be the end of Maradona’s ca- 
reer. ’. 


- In 1991, Maradona was suspended us- 
ing cocaine while playing is the Italian 


“I have alncady paid once for my 
faultSy and I can't continue to pay for 
thdn for eternity,’* he.said. 

(AP, Reuters) 


.* ~ 




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ENTERNATIONAIr HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. JULY 4 , 1994 




Page 17 


% Us \zr. *v&** 3 !f* 

****&■ 


■v 



DALLAS — Keanct Anders- 
son scared twice in due strond 
half Sunday, having set up a 
goal for Martin DahKnsrc min- 
utes into the match, as Sweden 
gained the World Cup quarter' 
finals for the first toe since 
1958 with a 3-1 . victory over 
Saudi Arabia. 

The veteran Swedes beat the 

youngsters from Saudi Arabia 
with & fast-paced game despite 
the heat and will play the win- 
no - of the day’s later match, 
between Argentina and Roma- 
nia, next Sunday. 

The Saudis, in their first 
World Cup, became the first 
team from the Gulf to advance 
past the opening round. 

“I don’t think other teams 
took them as seriously as we 
did.” said Sweden’s coach. 
Tommy Svensson. 

“We knew their forwards 
were very fast players and we 
Anew we had to prevent the 
Saudi midfielders playing the 
long pass. We had to be very 
careful, too, at the back and I 
think we did it all vay well .” 

The Sandis had chances, es- 
pecially in a rapid-fire IS min- 
utes midway through the sec- 
ond half. But they couldn't 
connect until substitute Fahad 
Gheshcyan blasted a shot past 
Thomas Ravdfi in 


i tores 


the 85th minute. 

After weeks of _ 
sometimes above 1 _ 
Fahrenhert (38 ceati^.. 

which European tw»mc 

at the noon kickoff it was a 
relatively frigid 87 degrees. 

Maybe that made the Swedes 
fed more at home. They came 
oat running, looked fresh and 
stymied the Saudi attack with a 
four-man backline and tight de- 
fense. Ravdfi made several sen- 
sational saves. 

The Cotton Bowl had a Sun- 
day-in- the-park feeding. Fans 
painted their faces and bodies 


m team and national colors. 
■Flags of the two teams. Hew; 
along with those froth Norway, 
Cana da, the United States and 
Britain. 

And the crowd — & bdow- 
caparity 60,277 — got a treat 
with a sight unusual for as in- 
tematiopal soccer march: A fast 
start and even ' a goal in "the 
opening minutes. 

As Sweden brought the ball 
down the left tide in the 'sixth 
nrinute,' Dahlia planted himself 
in the middle pear tire penalty 
spot Andersson swung a cross 
along the front line of the goal- 
box, and Dahfin, leaning in, 
headed the pass beyond goal- 
keeper Mohammad Deayea 

into to lower right-hand comer 
of the net. 

That gave Dahfin, who sat 
om the match a^inst Brazfl be- 
came of two yellow cards, four 
goals in the tournament 
• Andersson made it 2-0 exact- 
ly 45 minuics later on a spectac- 
ular one-sum play. He leaped 
over a SandTdefender to control 
the ball at the top ri ght comer 
of the penalty area, moved to 
Ids left across the fine and 
pulled up for a left-footed shot 
skimmed under a d e fen d er . 
and past the diving Deayea into 
the lower right-hand comer. 

Saudi Arabia finally, scored 
in the 85th minute. Gbesheyan, 
at 20 one of the youngest mem- 
bers of .a team with .a starting 
lineup avenging less than 24 
years of age, blew in from the 
right wing and Masted a IO- 
meter shot past RaveHi. Sud- 
denly, Sato Arabai needed one 
more goal to force overtime. 1 

But Andersson and Dahfin 
quickly combined. for some in- 
surance. In ihe 88 th minute, 
Dahfin brought the ball down 
the left tide and flicked a pass 
through the penalty area to Ah- 
densto who seat a right-footer 
past Deayea. 


SCHEDULE AND RESULTS 


: ; • SECOND ROUND 

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. - Sunday July 3 

MDriu 

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Monday July 4 
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• Scorers: GarmooV — Rudl vo«ter (4 and 
m JOnin Kflinrnm fll); (Malum — 
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on. Marini Vtaonar (Vi; Bakiun — PM-- 
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ana cm. AHor Baguldrialn (S7. penalty). 

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YMw anK Spain — Juaa GoUawMa 
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km I oni>/ Affwr Fnoa Pnsv 

Mourners accompanying the hearse bearing the body of Andrfes Escobar, die murdered Colombian soccer player. 

Colombian Player Shot Dead in Medellin 


r*V GoalScorers 


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QUARTERFINALS 

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AiDoMa 

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winner. 1935 GMT 

Sunday July 10 
At EM Rmtartori, MJ. 
MMOfrGUIgMi wmnar W, Gammy. 1806 GOT. 
At Suntord. COH. 

flu M n«. Wcn ari a * B WWm wlnrar.:t8360OT 

SEMIFINALS 

Wadhudoy Jidy IS 

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i m gie o-Bulgnrta/Gannany Oini, MOB BMT 
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S mJf i / Ha M m A igw i TOawmnar.aassoaiT 

THIRD PLACE 

Saturday July - ! E 
M PoBodena. CbBL 
SoRddna ion iBasaiir 

CHAMPIONSHIP 

Sunday July 17 
A( PMadana. OSf. 

' SwnHkml wlnnam. 1935 GMT 

Match Results 

Sweden X Saudi AraMa 1 
Scorers: Sweden— McrOn Oofttti Ml. Mara 
not Anctersaan (SI and TO* Sou* Arabia — 
Fata GMMyan (TO. 

Mane: Renatn MoraHMo (Brail). 

Vri tow cords: SMtn — Rower Uhw (MX 
Jww Thom (TO. Rrtond mwon (74): Sow* 
Arabia — Khoiid MuaUM (71). 


* -r Oa» Satoafca. RaMa. 

5 — Jdmn KHnsmcna Germany. 

3— GtarM SaflsfcAsA/vaEifino; Marlin Deft- 
nth 3mdKU JBOQ Mfanio GetaelxM »ato( 
Rwndrttv BrarH; Hrlttt SMeMm. Bctoorto. 
J — Phnom Albert, BaMum; Fuad Amin. 
Saudi Andtia; DanM AmokacM. maria: 
Gaorao* Braay.SwItxarlaain JaseCamltare. 
Stain: Clewdte Co r l oo** Araeattaa; Urte 
Qtwda. M a xl a n GHaarato Hook Romania; 
HeaaMyung B«aSooH> K orea; Florin Ra*t- 
Ctota, Ramanta; Adotto Vawmda Cotombia; 

RutflVacaer.Oermany. 

1 — Join Aldridge, Ireland; Ktanel Ander* 
mSwedni; Sami -laber. Saudi Arabia: Em- 
ami Amaan*. Nlorrta/ ofcw soetav l»- 
ly; Moraedno Boraot Mexico; DanW 
Bortmtarv. Buiuarla; BebeAvBraxH; Dtante 
SenAmma, MriberMnb; Tanas Brailiv Swe- 
den; StePtane Cbtaulaat. SwKxartand; Mo- 
honuned Qnoudi. Morocco; Marc Doorysie. 
GeMbim; David Same, Cameroon; Herman 
Oavfria. Colombia; Ftokfl Gaarae. NWrla; 
Gearan Oran. BMgfcen; Jama Guardlala. 
Spain; Fernando HJemv Spain: any 

HaaaMaK inhndJ Heme San Hone. SoaSt 
Korea; Wtm Jonfc, Nefbcrlandi; Adrian Knun. 
Swlbertand; Iordan UetcMaK.Buigor1a; Rae- 
er Uuna Swwttoi; HarnM Lozano, Cotombia. 

Martlm LuM EnrtcB*.aoo«n; DMta*oro- 
dona. ArstaHno; DanMe Hasten. Italy; 
RednrMIUcb Common; Hataan Nader, Mo- 
rocco; Franentae Ornam WWfc Cameroon; 
Sneed Owalran. Saudi Arabia: Daniel 
Fatmca.Romnnla;(Ardti1Radebeaka.Ri»- 
da: Rob Braril; KarVietai RfedteOarmamr; 
Kieffl RebdoL Norway; Bryan tort. NMhar- 
Midw -MHO SMUM Stain; QMnSdntfiez, 
Sodvki; Mfircto Santos. Brazil) Sea Juna 
WOO. Saudi Korea; Samson Stoda. Nlania; 
Nasfca Strahov, Butaarta; Emin SMwert, 
■ USj AJflbr Sutler, Swtbwrfand; Gaston Tow- 
monL Netherlands: ErtcWynaMa.UA; 
sMdl YAHMsata. 

Own Gaids: AmMs Escobar. CohwiMa (vs. 
Untied Stales). 


Camtpiied by (hr Staff Front Dispatches 

MEDELLIN, Colombia — Tens of 
thousands of mourners continued Sunday 
to file past the coffin of socoer star Andrts 
Escobar, outraged at his apparently having 
been murdered for accden tally scoring a 
goal against his own team during Colom- 
bia's loss to the United States. 

Escobar, 27, was shot early Saturday in 
the parking lot of a nightclub. The police 
had arrested two people, were searching 
for two others and had announced a re- 
ward of 50 mifiioQ pesos ($63,000) for 
information leading to die arrests of ! 
bar’s assassins. 

Officials said police were ini 


the possibility that one of the suspects had 
lost money on bets placed on the Colombi- 
an team. 

One police official, Jairo Antonio Ro- 
driguez, said that Escobar had been shot 
six times, not 12 as previously reported. 

“Thanks for tile own-goal,” one at the 
gunmen said before shooting Escobar, a 
witness told a radio reporter. Other wit- 
nesses said one of the gunmen shouted, 
“Goal! Goal!” as he fired each shot 

President C£sar Gaviria Trujillo and 
members of Colombia’s World Cup team 
were headed to Meddfin to attend Esco- 
bar’s funeral Sunday. More than 100,000 
people had filed through the city’s stadium 
where his body lay in state. 

Escobar, admired by many Colombians 
for the way he handled a player’s worst 
nightmare, was shot after three men and a 
woman confronted him at 3:30 AJNL Sat- 
urday outside the nightclub, die police 
said. They said the group argued with 
Escobar and blamed him for the team’s 
ouster from World Cop competition in the 
first round. 


Colombia, one of the favorites to win 
the championship, first lost by 3-1 to Ro- 
mania, then lost by 2-1 to the United 
States on June 22 before, too late, defeat- 
ing Switzerland. 

The national police reported the arrest 
of two suspects Saturday afternoon in Me- 
dellin. They were also searching for the 
owner of a truck the arrested men were 
using. Ihe truck’s owner had reported his 
vehicle stolen Friday night but now was 
massing himself, the police said. 

Additional bodyguards had been as- 
signed to each member of the Colombian 
team, which returned from the United 
States on Wednesday. 

Authorities said they were not ruling out 
the possibility that the slaying was linked 
to death threats made against the team. 
The family of its coach, Francisco Matur- 
ana, and of the midfielder Gabriel Jaime 
Gtoez, were threatened before the match 
against the United States. Those threats 
are widely believed here to have come from 
members of the powerful drug cartels, an- 
at having lost millions of dollars in 
; placed on the Colombian team. 

In a country where drug-related violence 
and the oldest guerrilla war in South 
America have contributed to one of the 
highest homicide rates in the world — in 
which presidential aspirants, judges and 
journalists have been killed — the execu- 
tion of a hard-luck soccer player sparked a 
profound sense of anguish. 

“21 is incredible that this has now 
reached the level of the athletes,” said the 
mayor of Medellin, Luis Ramos Bolero. 
“It is something you simply cannot ex- 
plain.” 

Escobar had planned to be married in 
December. 


"He was a tender, sweet man.” said 
Maria Eugenia Valencia, who waited in 
line for three hours to enter the stadium. "1 
loved him. It makes no sense that someone 
killed him. There’s no way to be happy or 
get excited about soccer anymore.” 

The murder came at a time when many 
Colombians and some U.S. bw enforce- 
ment officials have voiced concern about a 
resurgence in the drug-related violence 
that had diminished recently. 

There are indications that the remnants 
of the Medellin cartel are grouping with 
other smaller drug organizations and plan- 
ning an assault against the Cali cartel, now 
recognized as the world's most powerful 
cocaine traffickers. 

After the first anonymous death threats 
were made following Colombia’s surpris- 
ing loss to Romania in Los Angeles, securi- 
ty around the players was increased. When 
most of the team arrived at the airport in 
Bogota Wednesday, security was tight and 
chore were reports that the players and 
coaches would remain under guard. It was 
unclear whether Escobar, one of several 
players threatened by name, was under 
police protection after he arrived in Medel- 
lin. 

Many Colombians blamed him and the 
ball that deflected off his shin for rattling 
the team so badly that it never recovered. 

But Escobar sough i to deal with wbal be 
called the worst moment in his sports ca- 
reer. In an open letter to his country, 
published in a Bogota newspaper, he asked 
fans to “maintain decency,” and added: 
“Please tefl everybody” that playing in the 
World Cup “was the most rare, phenome- 
nal opportunity and experience 1 have ever 
had, so see you soon, because life doesn't 
end here.” (H'P. LAT, NYT, AP. AFP) 


Soccer Officials Call 
Escobar Murder 
Game’s Saddest Day 


Comptkdtx Ota Sst$ From DefOkha 

DALLAS — Andres Escobar 
could have been here this week- 
end instead of in his hometown 
of Medellin, Colombia. 

The popular soccer player, 
who was murdered early Satur- 
day. had been asked lo be a 
color commentator for Caracol 
radio, Colombia's premier net- 
work. after his team failed to 
advance to the second round. 

“We invited him to stay.” 
said Gusta Pombo, a network 
executive. 

Escobar considered the as- 
signment but decided against it 

“He said, ‘No, I want to go 
back home,* ” Pombo said. 

Sepp Blatte r, the general sec- 
retary of FIFA, soccer's govern- 
ing body, called Escobar’s mur- 
der “tbe^saddest day I have ever 
witnessed in football in a World 
Cup or any other competition. 

“If something happens by ac- 
cident, you can say it was the 
will of God. But when people 
deliberately shoot and kill 
somebody because he made a 
mistake in the game, something 
is wrong.” 

What had been an almost 
universal celebration of soccer 
for the past two weeks became a 
day of mourning as the second 
round began in Chicago and 
Washington. 

Word of Escobar's murder 
filtered through the RFK Stadi- 
um crowd and the locker 
rooms, intensifying in an offi- 
cial moment of silence before 
the match between Spain and 
Switzerland. 

“I just found out and 1 am 
speechless,” said Marden Da- 
vid, the producer for a Colom- 
bian television crew. “He was 
27 and we were friends since be 
was 19. Audits was the nicest, 
most decent man on the team, 
and the most disciplined.” 


Ireland’s coach. Jack Charl- 
ton. said he was considering 
giving Escobar’s family the 
money collected by Irish Ians to 
help pay a fine assessed against 
Charlton after a match against 
Mexico. 

“Who wants to play interna- 
tional football if you get assas- 
sinated doing it?" he asked 
“it's a dreadful thing, just 
dreadful.” 

Thomas Dooley, a midfielder 
for the U.S. learn, said. ‘ My 
first thought was, better we lose 
the game against Colombia 
than he lose his life.” 

“It’s terrible to have someone 
killed because of a game," said 
the Swiss goalkeeper Marco 
Pascolo. after his team’s 3-0 loss 
lo Spain. "Even for us it’s going 
to be tough to go home. There 
are a lot of regrets.” 

“This is despicable, an out- 
rage; people should realize it is 
only a game," said Abelardo 
Fernandez, a defender for Spain. 

Said Brazil's coach, Carlos 
Alberto Parreira; “We've got to 
start understanding that this is 
a game, not a war, and that all 
these crazy nationalistic feel- 
ings, while fine up to a point, 
have gone too far.” 

The coach of Mexico agreed 
“This makes one think about the 
kind of world we are living in, 
where we are heading. I hope it 
was only the act of a madman," 
Miguel Mejia Baron said. 

“The popularity of our game 
has (wo faces,” Blatter added 
“The first face produces joy and 
enthusiasm and brings poepte 
together as we have wintessed 
at the World Cup here. And on 
the other face, the game mirrors 
our life. It has violence, tears, 
corruption. Like life, it has all 
its problems." 

(LAT. AP. Reuters) 


WORLD CUP WRAP-UP 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispatches 

Brazil’s central defender. Ri- 
cardo Rocha, will miss Mon- 
day’s second round match 
against the United States be- 
cause of a recurrence of a thigh 
injury. 

Rocha first suffered the inju- 
ry during the 2-0 victory over 
Russia in Brazil’s opening 
match. He did not play in the 
subsequent games against Cam- 
eroon and Sweden. 

• Nigeria’s two injured full- 
backs, Augustine Eguavoen and 
Ben Iroha, have resumed train- 
ing and were hopeful of playing 
against Italy on Tuesday. 

Eguavoen hurt an ankle 
against Argentina, and Iroha 
his a groin strain from the 
opening match with Bulgaria. 

Italy’s coach, Arrigo Sacchi, 
hinted that he will move Paolo 
Maldxni to central defense and 
pick attacker Danide Massaro 
to stop what he called Nigeria's 
“supermen.” 

Midfielder Dino Baggio is 
struggling with a thigh strain 
and his place in practice was 
taken by the experienced Ro- 
bert oDonadoni. 

• FIFA has named the refer- 
ees for the remaining second- 
round matches. They are: 

Netherlands vs. Ireland, Pe- 
ter Mikkelsen of Denmark; 
Brazil vs. United States. Bo 
Karlsson of Sweden: Nigeria 
vs. Italy, Alberto Tgada Nor- 
iega of Peru; and Mexico vs. 
Bulgaria, Ali Mobamed Buj- 
saim of the United Arab Emir- 
ates. 

• ESPN averaged a 1.6 cable 
rating and 1.01 million house- 
holds for 32 first-round tele- 
casts. a 77 percent increase 
from the 57 1 ,000 average for 25 
games on the TNT Network 
during the 1990 tournament. 


ABC’s four first-round 
games averaged a 4.8 rating, 
which amounts to 4.52 million 
homes. 

Nielsen Media Research said 
ESPN’s 20 live games averaged 
a 2.1 cable rating in the net- 
work’s universe of 63.1 million 
homes, 

• Win or lose against Swe- 
den, each of the 22 Saudi play- 
ers will get something to re- 
member Sweden by. 

A Saudi Arabian business. 
Wafaa Zawawi, told the Swed- 
ish tabloid Idag that he had 
bought 22 Volvo 850 sedans to 
honor the Saudis' success. 

• Without realizing a live 
feed was sending his comments 
to viewers across Brazil Galvao 
Bueno of Globo television was 
caught complaining about 
Pete’s commentary during Bra- 
zil's game against Sweden. 

Viewers heard someone at 
the station ask Bueno to get 
Pete to “stop talking so much." 

Replied Bueno: "What can I 
do? He keeps talking. I’d have 
to kill him to get him to stop 
la iking.” 

• Caterers at Chicago’s Sol- 
dier Field have come to realize 
two things after two weeks of 
matches: The visiting World 
Cup fans don’t like peanuts, 
and they detest popcorn. 

“We couldn't give away pea- 
nuts, and we took popcorn off 
the menu after the second game 
here;" said Kevin Haggem, 
who runs the vending services 
at the home of the NFL Chica- 
go Bears. 

His company is selling about 
1.900 bags of peanuts a match, 
compared with 8.000 at Bears 
games and 16,000 at Chicago 
Cubs baseball games at Wriglev 
Field. 



ins Quarterfinals 




By Lawrie Mifflin 

iVor York Torm Service 

WASHINGTON — Spain advanced 
to the quarterfinals by potting a sturdy 
Swiss team out of the tonmameat with a 
show of defensive invincibility and 
wickedly fast counterattacking. 

Hie 3-0 score may not have fairly 
reflected the game’s flow, but there was 
no question about which teto deserved 
to win Saturday. Spain had all the de- 


i 


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meats: three tremendous saves 
keeper Andorti Zubizaretta, mactoe- 
fike control over the center of the 
defense by Miguel Angel Nadal speedy 
breakaways among the attackers and a 
goal in the 16th minute that allowed 
Spain to. keep. tightly focused on de- 
fense. 

The determined Swiss ended up look- 
ing Eke flies buzzing against a window- 
pan*, knocking themselves out over and 
over * g«n trying to attack, but ever 
unable to break through. 

It did not faeh> the cause of those for 
whom cowbells clanged constantly 
throughout the game that Alain Sutter, 
the skfllM, attack-minded Swiss mid- 
fielder, could not play because of a bro- 
ken toe. Painkiller injections had hel ped 
in two previous games, but not this time. 

Spam next plays the winner of Tues- 
day’s Italy-Nigeria match on Saturday 
in Foxboro, Massachusetts. 

Gaffing the Swiss team “powerful” 
and the game “difficult,” the Spanish 
coach, Javier Clemente, nonetheless 
said, “It was a dear victory for Spain.” 

Roy Hodgson, Switzerland's English 
coach, conceded as much but also said: 
“There were long periods of the game 
when we were able to push Spain back 


on the defensive. J don’t think they were 
three goals better than us.” 

Perhaps not, but the way the Spanish 
defease played, even one goal better was 
going to suffice. 

That first goal followed misfortune 
for the Swiss. Their fearless and tireless 
striker, Stephane Chapuisat, was 
brought down by a hard tackle ap- 
proaching the Spanish penalty area, but 
the referee, Mario Van der Bide of the 
Nethcriands, made no call 

The Spanish broke the other way, and 
from a midfield muddle, Fernando 
Hierro somehow whisked the ball out 
from among the legs of three Swiss, then 
bounded after it Elea puppy chasing a 
stick. With goalkeeper Marco Pascolo 
charging out at the edge of the area, 
Hierro slotted a hard passing shot down 
the right side and into the net. 


bade and lunged for a bouncing ball He 
struck it with his shin, but struck it hard 
— and Zubizaretta leaped high and 
the shot aside. 

ren minutes later, Chapuisat un- 
leashed a shot from 18 yards that 
seemed destined for the upper left cor- 
ner, but Zubizaretta again leaped high 
and tipped this one around the post. 

Two minutes later, the midfielder 
Sergi ran the ball horizontally across the 
top of the Swiss penalty area. A defend- 
er stayed with him, but none went with 
Luis Enrique as be broke for a perfectly 
calibrated short pass from Sergi. In 
stride, Enrique pounced, and the second 
goal was behind Pascolo. 

Pascolo later took a smashing shot in 
the face off the foot of Jorge Otero, a 
late substitute for Hierro, on another 
swift counterattack. And to add indigni- 


“Spain was able to get an early lead, 
and toy know bloody well how to de- defendCTAlbert Ferrer 
ted a lead,” said Hodgson. oolo had to dnugc out, and Ferer took a 

The )4scoie stoodmtilwefl into the ova JWo’s outstretched hand 

second halt And it stood in part because thal earned a penalty nek. 
of two great saves by the 34-year-old Aitor Begiristain, who had been a 
Zubizaretta, who is playing in his third defense-minded, substitute for the swift 
World Cup umrnameat for Spain. wing Jon Andom Goikoetxea m the 6 _d ^ 
-Twenty minutes into the second half, minute, scored on the shot in the 87th 
Adrian Knup got behind Spain's center minute. 



. _ 

kart Ksihft'Thr AwialoJ P»»-» 

Luis Enrique scoring the second of Spam's goals, despite Jiirg Snider's best effort 


! : 




r 





Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY* JULY 4, 1994 


Better Light Bulbs 
By Ingo Maurer 


By John Brunton 


A /f — You have to be for- 

JLVJL lunate to find Ingo Maurer. He's 
often in Paris, consulting with such 
architects as Jean NouveL Then there 
are the regular meetings in Milan, still 
the design capital of the world. Or he 


Tastemakers 

¥ 

OJ 

An occasional series 
ahoul people for whom 
stvle is a wav of life 




1 prpj* 

the world, Jidda for example, where 
he's created the lighting system for the 
new airport, or Israel, to work with his 
friend the avant-garde designer Ron 
Arad on the Tel Aviv Opera bouse. 

Today he happens to be in Munich, 
a quiet, provincial city, which is prob- 
ably the last place you’d expect to 
meet a designer renowned for combin- 
ing elegance and simplicity with a 
sharp, ironic humor, whose lamp cre- 
ations and inventions over the last 30 
years have revolutionized the way 
people use light 

Yet Munich is Ingo Maurer's home 
and hideaway. It's here, in the laby- 
rinth of his Heath Robinson-like ate- 
lier, that the German designer and the 
team of SO assistants he calls his “fam- 
ily," think up innovative new lighting 
systems with wacky names like 
YaYaHo or Touch Tronic, and stylish 
lamps called Little Black Nothing, 
One From the Heart Trybeca and 
Willy dill y. 


A very youthful 62, Maurer bubbles 
over with energy and enthusiasm. 

The planned half-hour interview 
turns into a half-day tour de force, 
ranging from his plans for an installa- 
tion of light objects — be insists the 
word “sculpture" is far too preten- 
tious — for the Centre des Archives 
du Travail in Roubaix, France, to a 
futuristic lamp design called Don Qui- 
xote, which you only have to touch to 
switch on and off, or gently squeeze to 
dim the light. And at the same time 
he's just as excited about the wonder- 
ful antipasti at Da Renato's, his favor- 
ite Italian restaurant in Munich. But 
that's hardly surprising, as Maurer 
once told an interviewer that the inspi- 


ration for one of his lamps was rigato- 
ni. 

“I live in Munich for two reasons," 
he said, “It’s great to get away from, 
and great to come back to. Sure, it's 
quiet and maybe a bit boring, so that 
makes it fun to travel, which I do for 
about six months a year. But then I'm 
always happy to come back too, be- 
cause it's in Munich that I actually 
produce my lamps, where I have my 
team of designers and technicians. 

“People ask me why I don't work in 
Milan, saying that style can only come 
out of Italy. But I thmk the Italians 
take things far too seriously, while in 
Germany, there’s great energy and 
things actually get done." 

Maurer received no formal design 
t raining , studying graphic arts, then 
working in the United States as a 
typographer and freelance commer- 
cial artist, until he created his first, 
critically acclaimed lamp, simply 
named Bulb. 

He has no shop, no showroom, but 
his designs sell all over the world. 
Moreover, be manages to tread a deli- 
cate tightrope between commercial 
success and artistic recognition, mov- 
ing freely from designing the lighting 
for a shopping mall m Copenhagen to 
creating an ephemeral exhibition, 
“ Tjimife re, Hasard, Reflexion" for the 
Fon elation Cartier. And he has very 
strong ideas when it comes to discuss- 
ing style. 

“Creating light for a space is a ser- 
vice, and not an opportunity for the 
designer to impose ids own vanity. 
Often people have a good, simple idea, 
and then they want to make it stylish, 
to decorate it, and at the end, the idea 
just disappears. That’s the danger if 
you think too much about style." 

Maurer is convinced that too many 
designers arejust concerned about the 
commercial angle. He insists that he 
creates his ideas for himself, and that 
if they sell later, then all well and 
good, if not, too bad. He can invest up 
to 400,000 Deutsche marks (about 
5250,000) on prototypes and tooting, 
but developing some ideas has almost 
bankrupted him. “But you've got to 
take risks," he said. 

“I think my own best achievement 
has been to strip bade the halogen 
lamp to its barest minimum, turning it 



•As.n.-' 


- . Ar * .V ■ 


- Iota Bnmtrm 

Light wizard Maurer combines elegance, simplicity — and humor. 


into a functional, moving, utilitarian 
object Then, it’s up to the consumer 
to finish off my idea, if you like, to 
make what he wants of the light and 
create his own style:" 


The best illustration of Maurer’s 
philosophy is his influential creation, 
the YaYaHo lighting system — a thin, 
low-voltage wire, perfectly safe to 
touch, that can be stretched across a 


room, with movable hale 
hanging down, seemingly floating in 
spaced Once the system is up, the onus 
is on you to create fee lighting you 
want. And ifyou follow Ingo Maurer's 
advice, you’ll just have fun and forget 
all about style and trends. 


John Brunton is a free-lance journal- 
ist and photographer. 


LANGUAGE 


Coffin# Clinton Some Slack 

• v . . ' ‘ . — 1 MaMnne 


By Wiliam Satire 

W ASHINGTON ““Americans of ary gener- 
ation," Bill Clinton. told. UCLA students 
this spring, “have been bombarded by images on 
television shows,and even one book, about the 
so-called 'Generation X’ filled wifecymesand 
slackers. Well, what I have seen today.is not a 
generation of Slackers, but a generation of 
seekers.” 

The CEatoa use of fee word slacker calls to 
mind fee reaction (rf F ranlrfm D. Roosevelt when 
Republicans complained of continuing depres- 
sion: “There is ah old and somewhat lugubrious 
adage that says, ‘Never speak of rope in. fee house 
of a man who has been hangcd-*In the same way, 
if I were a Republican leader speaking to a mixed 
audience, the last word in fee wh^ .dUkniooaiy 
that I think I would users fealword ‘depression. 

The last word we might expect from Clinton, 
frequently accused of using deception m avoid- 
ing fee draft during the Vietnam War, is slacker. 
Perhaps he took a current = senseirom the title of 
.Richard LinMater’s 1991 film, “Slacker,” ede- 
' brating the lazy life of Tcgcas drifters and castoffs 
in their 20 s who are now niorc frequently called ‘ 
Generation JTers than twentysomeihings. (That 
term is derived from feue title of the TV series 
“thirtysomething.” Curiously, fee longer -some- 
thing has replaced the suffix-isft.) And perhaps a 
young speech writer wanted to contrast those 
slackers with seekers, presumably from "seekers 
of truth,? as in JeramWs efforts to “find a 
man ". . . that seeketh the truth." 


issue of American 

also the title Of a 1964 book WCMJW inamm 

and Jane Deverson about fee alienated geoer- 

at Ev«^boS' t ™ts to be part ofa^ratim 1 ; 
'it’s an exclusive cultural dub. 
nest Hemingway Gatrrale Spin .km* 
feOT jn France with dte 
World War I: Winston Qmrchifi, m 1930, called 

it "a generation shorn by the war Jack Kerouac 

is credited wife coining theBeal Gteeroow. Jdhn 
F Kennedy, hi his inaugural, said, rite torch 
h is been passed to a new generation of 

Americans/ . • . 

Generation comesfrom the Latm gams, birth, 
kind." also generating general and generous. 
.Grammarians clasp fee related gemuve to their 
bosbdos. a case showing possession. We all have 
that yearning to belong. . . 

: ■ ■ □ ; 

Now that wc can no longer loDygag in the- sun 
on summer weekends while pretending to be 
assiduously “getting a tan,” what is there to do in 

the shade? Read. Get onpage. Here isa small bag 

of books; from best-sellers to hidden treasures, 

for writers and other readers: 

“Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness, 
by Peggy Noonan (Randan House, SS). What 
is it in her pointillist, impressionistic, highly 
original style that enthralled some reviewers and 
drove some ideologues up the wall and through 
-fee roof? See tor yoursdf: this ongoing memoir 








--i* 


i. 




y ! Jr 


The noun slacker — from the adjective slack, 
meaning “loose" — first appeared in 1898 to 
refer to “one who avoids wok or physical exer- 
cise; a shirker." During Wold War L it was a 
derogation of anyone avoiding nriEthry service, 
including conscientious objectors. In World War 
Q, it was used interchangeably with draft dodger. 

Since the late 1960s, it has regained its original, 
general meaning as a second sense, which may be 
‘'what Bill Qintonhad in mind. The harsh edge of 
the word may have been softened by the inference 

oS cut him some slack, derivixl. from loosening a 
taut rope in saflmg, its meaning extended to “ease 
up cm nhn; allow room for maneuver.” ' 

Slacks ate also casual trousers, not part of a 
suit; in the ’90s, slacking now denotes the wear- 
ing of loose jeans: “The hip-tapsters’ trademark 
blue jeans five sizes too big (aka “docking” wrote 
the m« gnrinc Essence, “created such a noise that 
clothing giants like Levi . Strauss & Co. began 
manufacturing oversize jeans to quench , de- 
mand.” (Take it from me: baggy or “relaxed fit" 
jeans have long been the favorite of 


upon/ 


line in America,” fay William 
Cobbett (Cornell, $29.95), The muscular sty leaf 
the first great media vituperator fee 1790s 
En glish journalist about whom the fourth estate 
was coined— is made accessible wife an Qlumi- 
natingin traduction .and helpful editing by David 
A/Wuson. How to write wife fists denched. 

“American Politics in the Early Republic.** by 
James Roger Sharp (Yale, $30). Y 
George Washington & Co. had it easy? __ , 
Syracuse University takes us from the Whisky 
Rebellion to the Aden and Sedition Acts in the 
liveliest exp ositio n yet of fee roots of ourpresent 
political power struggles. _ • 

“The Power to Persuade;" followed by a 13- 
word subtitle; by 'Richard N. Haass (Hough ton 
MifOim $21.95). A primer on setting up “murder 
boards” awl public opinion snares for pols and 
business managers working toward feeir spin 
doctorate. . 

. -Eschew the trashy and-embrace fee read- 
worthy. Remember fee acronym Gwigwo: Good 
Writing In,. Good Writing Out. 

New York Ttnus Service 



And what ^Generation X, that nonslacker but 
often happily slacking cohort of seekers referred 
to by the president?. Although the coinage is 
usually attributed to the title of a 1991 novel by • 
Douglas Coupland, the philologists John and - 
Adde Algeo note in the forthcoming Fall 1994 


INTERMnONAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Page 16 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Today 


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Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Weatfter. Asia 



North America 

The remnants of Tropical 
Storm Alberto will continue 
to bring heavy veto to the 
southeastern Untied States 
Tuesday. The rain wa abate 
by midweek. Heel aril cover 
much of the rnkteecbon of 
the Untied Slates through 
midweek Including Denver, 
Kansas City and Chicago. 


Europe 

Sweltering heat will bake 
Spain through the middle of 
the week. Thta heat wfll am 
reach Home tar a rkn*. Most 
of the British Mas wiD be 
cool and damp through 
Thursday. There will be 
occasional bouts of rain in 
London. A lew showers and 
thunderstorms will swing 
through Paris and Brussels. 


Asia 

A tropical depression will 
soak southern China and 
northern Vietnam this week 
with heavy reins. Eastern 
Chin w9 be rather hot and 
humid through the middle of 
this weak. Tha heat will 
reach Send lor a day or two. 
Attar a hot man to tha weak. 
Tokyo wB turn cooter later in 
iha week. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


Tony 


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ACROSS 

1 Unhappy 
aMan with the 
world on his. 
shoulders 
10 Israeli earner 

l« ‘Mona ’ 

is Scarfetl's love 

16 Comic Rudner 

17 What we 
celebrate an 
July 4 

20 Honor, with "to* 

21 Form 1040 
amount 


ax Buntline and 
Rorem - 

23 Sean Connery, 
e.g. 

24 Cuke’s home 
27 Fifth Avenue 

name 

aa Catch in the act 
21 Gaucho's rope 
32 Goffer 
Ba Hester os 
29 Old Russian 
assembly 
34 What we 
observe on . 
July4 


Solution to Pntle of July 1 


□□E3E3B □[!□□ □BEDS 

hqbqh nonB cinaa 
□□anti nnosHiDziaa 

□snoan maasa 
heje □□□anjoHGi 
□□□ nasaa ssaa 
□□HQ asmaa anas 
□qhu □□□□□ aaa 
nmmaaaum aaa 
□qqqq SHaanQ 
naaaiaaaaaaizia 
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□QQQ □□□[! QUUUy 

□heis [3H13Q aaaaa 


27 Bronze and Iron 
38 Some . 

Intersections 
aa Think . 

40 Stag party 
attendees. 

41 Scorch 
42-Ranch 

43 Tools locale 

44 da foie 

gras 

48 Book after 
Nehemiah 
48 Fortification 
52 What we watch 
on July 4 

54 a lulu 

55 Miss Brooks 
portrayer 

36 Muck 
57 Witnessed - 
so Stocking 
. material 
oo Some whiskies 


7 — —majesty 
a Arm of the 
Treasury Dept, 
.oiu 

10 Construct . 

11 Island near 
Venice 

12 Mighty mite 
is Costly doth 
10.1 

soot I- 


41 "Goodnight. •• 44 Kind of truck 

‘(ofdTV 45 Horde poetry. 

. phrase) . 46‘AukJLang 

c ^ 4 , 7 }^ beder known 
42lJkeSamson. '• 'te its bark than 

once- - its bite 


40 Third degrees', 
usually 

4« Seaman’s shout 
so Nod off 
’ si Rams’ dams 
so Dernier - — 


isSonofSeth 
xsBasebafl and 
hockey stats 
94 Father at Hector 
and Parts 


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as Danny of the 
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aa Weighed down 
27 Passover feast 
aa Blue 

entertainment 
29 Hotpoint rival 


DOWN 


ab.Sangtothe 


i Happy . 
a Green shade 

3 Employed . 

4 Seasons, as 
meat 

5 Teen hangout 
e Dean Martin's 

‘ Amore* 


l Golf legend 
Sam 


33 Docto r's 
instrument 


i Intangible 


i Egypt's- 
Church 



'-X -z. 


» way m e n aroiro 

QNew York Tbna Edited by WOlShoits.. 



Tiwd in a work! without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 



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COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER ; COUNTRY 

ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA 

Italy* 

172-1011 Brazil 

000-8010 

AastraHa 

1-800-891-0X1 

Liechtenstein* 

IKMMm - dtOe 

OOa-0312 

CUn,ntC*** 

10811 

TMjmnh, 

- • . 8*196 rinbmhh 

■ 980-11-0010 

Guam 

018-872 

Luxembourg 

08004)111 Costa Rica*u 

‘ 114 

Hong Kong 

800-1111 

Macedonia. F.YJBL of . 99-800-4288 Ecuador 

119 

India* 

. 000-117 

Maha“ 

#" 0800-890110 ; El Salvador** 

190 

Indonesia* 

001-801-10 

Monaco* - 

19a- 0011 Guatemala’ r' 

•-190 

Japan* 

0039-111 

Nctber lands* 

0OO22r9UU . Guyana*** - 

- 165 

Korea 

009-11 

Norway 

800-190-11 - Honduras’* 

-123 

Korea aa 

'll* 

Pritand**— 

OaOIO- 480-0111 frlejdcxjAAA 

95-800-162-4240 

Malaysia* 

800-0011 

Portugal* 

■ 05017-1-288' - jararaknaOtanaanw) 174 

New Zealand 

000-911 

BtSiminlii 

01-800-4288 Panama* .: x 

. 109 

Philippines’ 

105-11 

8 ussla*'(Moscow) 

155-5042 Pent* . .. 

191 

Saipan* 

23*2872 

StonUa- 

00-4204)0101 Suriname 

. 156 

Singapore 

8000111-111 

Spain* 

. 90099-00-11 Uruguay 

00-0410 

Sri Lanka 

430-430 

Sweden* 

-- 020-795-611 v- Venezuela**- 

804)11-120 

Taiwan’ 

0080-10288-0 

Switzerland* 

1554)0-11 CARIBBEAN 

Thailand* 

0019-991-1111 

ns. • 

0500-89-0011 Babamas 

1-800472-2881 

EUROPE 

Ukraine* 

. 8a 10O-11 Bemuds* ■ . 

1-800-872-2881 

Armenia’* 

8*14111 

M1DDUEEAST British Vi . 

.. -. 1-800*872-2881 

Austria”** 

022-903-011 

Bahrain 

800-001 Carman 1/dands 

1-800-872-2881 

Bdgbtrn* 

0800-100-10 

Cyprus* 

080-90010 Grenada* 

1-800872-2881 

Bulgaria 

00-18004010 

Jterad 

*177-1002727 Haht* ■ 

•001-800972.2883 

Croatia**' 

• 99-38-0011 
00420-00101 

Kuwait - 

. 800-288.- . Jamalci** 

,0-800-872-2881 

Dcxunaric* 

8001-0010 

Qaw - 

0800611-77. Si Kins/Nevis 

001-800-872-2881 
. I-80O-872-2RR1 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

Saudi Arabia 

1-80010 AFRIT* A 

France 

19*-0011 

Turkey* 

00-800-142/7 ESYper (Cairo) 


Germany 

-013041810 

UAE' 

800-121 Gabon*. 

OOa-OOI 

Greece* 

00-800-1311 

AMERICAS / Gambia* ! ' 

00111 

Hungary* 

OOa-SOO-OIXII 

Argernina* 

001-800-200-1111 Keow* - 

0800-10- 

tcebodhi 

998001 

Belize* 

555 IH/eria 


Ireland 

1-800-550-000 

Bolivia’ 

0-800-1112 SoothACrlcs 


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